Researchers join the Science Festival


Get an insight into research made at the Department of Biology and Biological Engineering! Our researchers can be found in Nordstan, at Universeum, Pedagogen and a Sciencetrain during the five festive days.

​The International Science Festival has been arranged for 20 years and is considered to be a leading scientific event. For five tightly scheduled days, April 13-17, researchers and students meet the public.
Systems biologist Joakim Norbeck is one of this year’s participants.
– It’s a good way to get experience in getting our message out, in a straightforward way. After all, to inform is one of our missions, he says.
– Furthermore, there has been a biotechnological revolution in the past 10-15 years, and it’s fun to be able to tell about this. Our field of research has exploded with new knowledge.
Getting ready for his presentation, he is pondering how to explain that yeast is so much more than a yellow package in the fridge.
– For me, who usually talk in front of students, it is a true challenge to speak before people with an unknown background. Everything has to be explained in the easiest way, and that is what I find most exciting. How am I going to make our work visible to them? Maybe I will bring a pair of scissors and strings in different colours.

This is where you meet the scientist from the Department of Biology and Biological Engineering during the International Science Festival:

Wednesday April 13, Nordstan:

12.00-15.00 Explore the world of light – workshop

Michael Stührenberg, PhD student, Juris Kiskis, PhD student, Arsalan Latif, Master student, Erik Hardselius, Master student, Akanksha Moga, Master Student. All from the Division of Chemical Biology.

Light off – it’s dark. Light on – see the world! Microscopy is used to see light from and magnify very tiny objects. In the workshop we will help you understand microscopy by exploring questions like: Is white light really white? Can light be invisible? Do things look different under the microscope?

12.00-15.00 Microscopy for human health – workshop

Juan Carlos Fierro-Gonzalez, Assistant professor, Alexandra Paul, PhD student, Stéphanie Blockhuys, PostDoc, Duong Nguyen, PostDoc, all from the Division of Chemical Biology. Cecilia Brännmark, PostDoc, physiology, university of Gothenburg.

An interactive workshop on ways to model the human body, in order to understand diseases, injuries and development. The scientists will teach you about the developments of fetuses, cancer, obesity and tissue reconstruction. Get a microscopic view of the research!

15.30-16.00 With focus on the unique cell in tissuelike materials

Annika Enejder, Professor, Chemical Biology

With the help of laserbased microscopy the researchers at Chalmers are able to depict cells in different tissuelike materials, in order to model and understand how the local environment affects the development of diseases like cancer and Alzheimer’s.

16.15-16.45 Protein strands and Alzheimer’s dementia

Elin Esbjörner Winters, Assistent professor, Chemical Biology

Alzheimer’s disease is caused by the atrophy and death of nerve cells. The research group of Elin Esbjörner Winters is trying to understand why. They are investigating the protein amyloid beta that is known to form toxic strands in the sick brain. In this presentation they will tell more about the existing knowledge on how amyloid beta kill nerve cells.

17.00-17.30 Early development – unique & alike

Juan Carlos Fierro-Gonzalez, Assistent professor, Chemical Biology

A human, a mouse, a frog and a one mm short roundworm look very different; but, in fact, the very early steps in the life of their embryos manifest striking similarities, especially in how their cells change shape and move. It’s these similarities that help us unravel human biology and disease.

Thursday April 14, Nordstan:

10.30-11.00 Protein folding – a life and death question

Pernilla Wittung-Stafshede, Professor, Chemical Biology

Proteins are doing a lot of work in our bodies, and the protein strands need to be folded in order to activate. But if the folding is done in the wrong way, so that the strands get tangled, we might become ill. Pernilla Wittung-Stafshede is exploring protein folding and how misfolding is connected to different diseases.

11.15-11.45 Antibiotic resistance – What? How?

Fredrik Westerlund, Associate professor, Chemical Biology


Antibiotic resistance is a big and serious threat to our health. Resistant bacterias are spread globally, both quick and easy. Fredrik Westerlund kills of some false rumours and describe the new tools developed by his research team in order to minimize dispersion of the bacterias.

12.00-15.00 Microscopy for human health – workshop

Juan Carlos Fierro-Gonzalez, Assistant professor, Alexandra Paul, PhD student, Stéphanie Blockhuys, PostDoc, Duong Nguyen, PostDoc, all from the Division of Chemical Biology. Cecilia Brännmark, PostDoc, physiology, university of Gothenburg.

An interactive workshop on ways to model the human body, in order to understand diseases, injuries and development. The scientists will teach you about the developments of fetuses, cancer, obesity and tissue reconstruction. Get a microscopic view of the research!

12.00-15.00 Explore the world of light – workshop

Michael Stührenberg, PhD student, Juris Kiskis, PhD student, Arsalan Latif, Master student, Erik Hardselius, Master student, Akanksha Moga, Master Student. All from the Division of Chemical Biology.

Light off – it’s dark. Light on – see the world! Microscopy is used to see light from and magnify very tiny objects. In the workshop we will help you understand microscopy by exploring questions like: Is white light really white? Can light be invisible? Do things look different under the microscope?

Friday April 15, Nordstan:

12.00-15.00 Microscopy for human health – workshop

Juan Carlos Fierro-Gonzalez, Assistant professor, Alexandra Paul, PhD student, Stéphanie Blockhuys, PostDoc, Duong Nguyen, PostDoc, all from the Division of Chemical Biology. Cecilia Brännmark, PostDoc, physiology, university of Gothenburg.

An interactive workshop on ways to model the human body, in order to understand diseases, injuries and development. The scientists will teach you about the developments of fetuses, cancer, obesity and tissue reconstruction. Get a microscopic view of the research!

12.00-15.00 Explore the world of light – workshop

Michael Stührenberg, PhD student, Juris Kiskis, PhD student, Arsalan Latif, Master student, Erik Hardselius, Master student, Akanksha Moga, Master Student. All from the Division of Chemical Biology.

Light off – it’s dark. Light on – see the world! Microscopy is used to see light from and magnify very tiny objects. In the workshop we will help you understand microscopy by exploring questions like: Is white light really white? Can light be invisible? Do things look different under the microscope?

Friday April 15, Pedagogen Hus A, sal AK2 138:

17.00-17.45 Yeast beyond bread, wine and beer

Joakim Norbeck, Associate professor, Systems biology

Yeast has been used for thousands of years to make bread, wine and beer. But yeast can do a lot more than that. In this presentation you will learn about the yeast’s capability for production of pharmaceuticals, fuel and chemicals – areas that are now within our reach.

Friday April 15, Universeum:

18.15-19.30 Science Slam

The Science slam contest is a great way for non-experts to meet science in a fun, accessible and entertaining way. Researchers from different disciplines give 3-minute presentations. The audience decides who wins. Experience science in its most entertaining way!

Science Slam is presented by Chalmers, the university of Gothenburg and Universeum. We have one participant from the department of Biology and Biological Engineering – Cecilia Mayer, Food and Nutrition Science.

We are looking at plant based protein as a catalyst for progression of Swedish agriculture towards health and sustainability. Environmental issues and lifestyle related diseases are great challenges we face globally today. Lowering the environmental impact from the food sector is essential if we are to meet our national sustainability goals. We want to develop innovative, nutritious and appealing food products as an important tool in approaching these problems by creating value to plant based protein crops.

Friday April 15, Stora Teatern:

16.30-17.30 Science Roulette on the train Stinsen

The usual Science Roulette is taking a break this year since the big wheel on Liseberg is under maintenance. Instead, the roulette will be held on the Science Train Stinsen! The train is filled with scientists, and each get 15 minutes to tell the public about their work. The Science Train starts outside Stora Teatern and you will be taken through Gothenburg while being stuffed with knowledge!

From the department of Biology and Biological Engineering:

Cecilia Tullberg, PhD student, Food and Nutrition Science

We are examining what happens to fish oil after dinner, when it is passing through our digestive system. Is Omega-3 destroyed along the way? If so, can we stop this from happening? We think that it might be possible to enhance our uptake of Omega-3. In that way we could benefit more from the marine resources.

Alexandra Bergman, PhD student, Systems biology

We all know yeast from beer and bread making – but have you ever considered this organism as a diverse chemical factory? Within the research field “metabolic engineering”, we modify the metabolism of organisms in order to meet the market demand of many different chemicals. In this way, we can create production platforms that utilize renewable biomass as input. This presentation will give you a small introduction of how cell factories can be created.

Sunday April 17, Nordstan:

13.00-13.40 Using yeast to study human diseases

Dina Petranovic, Associate professor, Systems biology

There are three types of cell on our planet: Bacteria and Archaea are single cell organisms, and Eukarya can be single cell organisms (e.g yeast) or multicellular organism (e.g animals, and plants). Yeast and human cells are similar in many ways, and researchers can exploit yeast to learn about human cells.

 

Text: Mia Malmstedt

Link to the Science Festivals homepage.

Page manager Published: Mon 11 Apr 2016.