News: Nanovetenskap och nanoteknikhttp://www.chalmers.se/sv/nyheterNews related to Chalmers University of TechnologyFri, 22 Oct 2021 02:30:10 +0200http://www.chalmers.se/sv/nyheterhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/ict/news/Pages/Can-automated-fact-checkers-clean-up-the-mess.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/ict/news/Pages/Can-automated-fact-checkers-clean-up-the-mess.aspxCan automated fact checkers clean up the mess?<p><b>​The dream of free dissemination of knowledge seems to be stranded in a swamp of tangled truth. Fake news proliferates. Digital echo chambers confirm biases. Even basic facts seem hard to be agreed upon. Is there hope in the battle to clean up this mess?  </b></p>​Yes! Within the research area of information and communications technology (ICT) a lot of effort is made to find software solutions. As part of the<span style="background-color:initial"> Act Sustainable week, starting 15th of November, t</span><span style="background-color:initial">h</span><span style="background-color:initial">e ICT Area of Advance </span><span style="background-color:initial">invites you to a morning session with focus on automated fact-checking.​ </span><div><br /><span style="background-color:initial"></span><div><div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">AGENDA 18 November</h3> <div><div></div> <div><div><b>09:45 Introduction </b></div> <div><b>Erik Ström</b>, Director, Information and Communications Technology Area of Advance</div> <div><b>10:00 Looking for the truth in the post-truth era</b></div> <div><b>Ivan Koychev,</b> University of Sofia, Bulgaria. He will give a brief overview of how to automatically find the claims and facts in the text and how further to look for their confirmation or refutation.</div> <div><b>10:30 Computational Fact Checking for Textual Claims</b></div> <div><b>Paolo Papotti,</b> Associate Professor, EURECOM, France. He will cover the opportunities and limitations of computational fact checking and its role in fighting misinformation. He will also give examples from the &quot;infodemic&quot; associated with the COVID-19 pandemic.</div> <div><b>11:00 Pause</b></div> <div><b>11:10 Panel discussion</b></div> <div>Moderator <b>Graham Kemp</b>, professor, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Chalmers together with an invited panel.​ More info to come!</div> <div><b>12:00 The end​</b></div></div> <div><b><br /></b></div> <div></div></div> <div>Welcome to learn more about how to sort out some of the tangle!​</div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="https://www.actsustainable.se/thursday21" target="_blank" title="link to the Act Sustainable website"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Read more and register here</a></div> <div><a href="https://www.actsustainable.se/thursday21" target="_blank" title="link to the Act Sustainable website"></a><a href="https://www.actsustainable.se/" target="_blank" title="Link to start page Act Sustainable website"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Read more about the Act Sustainable week​</a>​<br /></div></div></div> <div><br /></div></div>Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/materials/news/Pages/Additive-manufacturing-can-fundamentally-change-the-way-we-live.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/materials/news/Pages/Additive-manufacturing-can-fundamentally-change-the-way-we-live.aspxAdditive manufacturing can fundamentally change the way we live<p><b>​“I look very much forward to the Materials for tomorrow workshop”, says Uta Klement, Professor in Surface and Microstructure Engineering.This year’s seminar Materials for Tomorrow is devoted to the broad diversity of additive manufacturing, across materials and applications. The topic is &quot;Additive Manufacturing – From academic challenges to industrial practice&quot;. The event will take place online, November 17th, with several internationally recognized speakers. ​</b></p>​​<img src="/en/areas-of-advance/materials/news/PublishingImages/Uta-Klement_MFT.jpg" alt="Uta Klement" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" style="margin:5px" /><span style="background-color:initial"><strong>“There is a very close </strong>cooperation between academia and industry. This is also reflected in CAM2, the Centre for Additive Manufacture – Metal, in which around 25 companies are involved and help define research questions”, says Uta Klement, and she continues:</span><div><br /></div> <div>“To achieve the United Nations SDGs, we need to fundamentally change the way we live, including the way we manufacture products. Additive manufacturing contributes to resource efficiency by reducing material waste and energy consumption. Additive manufacturing, AM, can also help to produce lightweight components, which will help reduce fuel costs and the carbon footprint of, for example, planes, cars, and trucks”.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Uta Klement </strong>is Professor in Materials Science at Chalmers University of Technology with emphasis on Electron Microscopy and is Head of the Division of Materials and Manufacture at the Department of Industrial and Materials Science. She is also heading the Surface and Microstructure Engineering research group.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Why is this technology so interesting?</strong></div> <div>“In addition to rapid prototyping through 3D printing, Additive Manufacturing can offer local on-demand spare parts production, customer-specific products, lightweight construction, functional integration, and the opportunity to implement completely new ideas. Product development and market entry can be accelerated significantly while cost reduction and sustainability goals can be achieved at the same time”, says Uta Klement.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>What is the most exciting in the field?</strong></div> <div>“A broader adoption of the additive manufacturing technology depends on the ability to control the entire eco-system, involving pre-printing, printing, and post-printing. This is what we do in CAM2, the Centre for Additive Manufacture - Metal. In addition to a better understanding of the different parts of the process chain, there is currently much focus on quality assurance and the use of inline process monitoring systems together with AI to detect and avoid defects in built components. Also in operando measurements are of much interest to better understand the process and the formed microstructure.</div> <div>Even though additive manufacturing enables the manufacture of parts with a high degree of complexity, internal cooling channels or lattice structures, the surface integrity of the parts is often of inadequate quality, where values for the surface roughness can be much higher than acceptable for many applications. Therefore, surface integrity plays an important role in defining the part's operational performance, which is why post-processing to improve the surface integrity of additively manufactured parts is critical to the introduction of the technology in its broadest sense and requires more attention”, says Uta.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Which materials can be used in Additive Manufacturing / 3D printing?</strong></div> <div>“Due to their ease of use and low melting temperatures, 3D printing began with polymeric materials. Today, additive manufacturing / 3D printing encompasses most types of materials, from polymers to metals, ceramics to living cells”.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Which is the most advanced object constructed using additive manufacturing?</strong></div> <div>“That is of course a matter of opinion. Being able to make custom body parts after trauma surgery can be seen as very important and advanced. But even parts that cannot be manufactured using conventional, i.e., subtractive processes, including material-saving lightweight structures, are very progressive and require a completely new design. For future space exploration, when we travel to Moon and Mars, Additive Manufacturing will be fundamental for producing the vital infrastructure”.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>What are you most looking forward to at this seminar?</strong></div> <div>“I'm looking forward to interesting lectures that give a broad overview of what can already be done with Additive Manufacturing / 3D printing and what challenges we still face”.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Who should attend to the seminar?</strong></div> <div>“Everyone is welcome, from beginners to experts. I think the seminar offers something for everyone and everyone can learn something new.</div> <div>I hope the participants learn during the seminar that additive manufacturing is very broad and a topic that will keep us busy for the next years to come”, Uta Klement concludes.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="/en/areas-of-advance/materials/Calendar/Pages/Materials-for-Tomorrow-2021.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" /><span style="background-color:initial">P</span><span style="background-color:initial">rogram Materials for Tomorrow 2021 </span></a><br /></div> <span style="background-color:initial"><a href="https://ui.ungpd.com/Surveys/e19f2bbb-3ee3-4e2f-b259-173b334d614a"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Register to the seminar </a></span>Fri, 24 Sep 2021 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/ict/news/Pages/WASP-PhD-Student-Positions.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/ict/news/Pages/WASP-PhD-Student-Positions.aspxCall for WASP affiliated PhD Student Positions<p><b>15 open positions within WASP Graduate School</b></p><p class="chalmersElement-P"><b>​Application deadline: </b>October 31, 2021 <span>(opens October 1)</span></p> <p><font color="#212121"><br /></font></p> <p><font color="#212121">The Wallenberg AI, Autonomous Systems and Software Program hereby announces a <b>call for 15 affiliated WASP PhD student positions </b>at the five partner universities Chalmers, KTH, Linköping University, Lund University and Umeå University as well as the research groups at Örebro University and Uppsala University that are members of WASP. The purpose of the call is to provide the opportunity for PhD students not funded by WASP to be part of the WASP Graduate School.</font></p> <p><font color="#212121"><br /></font></p> <p><font color="#212121"><em><b>Wallenberg AI, Autonomous Systems and Software Program (WASP)</b> is Sweden’s largest ever individual research program, a major national initiative for strategically motivated basic research, education, and faculty recruitment. The program addresses research on artificial intelligence and autonomous systems acting in collaboration with humans, adapting to their environment through sensors, information, and knowledge, and forming intelligent systems-of-systems. </em><br /></font></p> <p><font color="#212121"><br /></font></p> <p><span style="background-color:initial;color:rgb(33, 33, 33)"></span></p> <p><span style="background-color:initial;color:rgb(33, 33, 33)"><a href="https://wasp-sweden.org/calls/call-for-affiliated-wasp-phd-student-positions/" target="_blank" title="link to WASP call website"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Read the full information on the WASP website</a></span><br /></p> <p><br /></p> <div> </div> <div> </div>Thu, 23 Sep 2021 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/energy/news/Pages/Areas-of-Advance-Award-for-a-method-that-enables-full-development-of-RNA-based-medicines.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/energy/news/Pages/Areas-of-Advance-Award-for-a-method-that-enables-full-development-of-RNA-based-medicines.aspxAwarded for a method that enables full development of RNA-based medicines<p><b>​RNA-based therapeutics had their big breakthrough as a Covid vaccine. But in order to also be able to cure cancer and other diseases, a refined technology is needed that increases the uptake of RNA into the cell. Elin Esbjörner and Marcus Wilhelmsson have led a research team that has developed a method that facilitates this development. For this, they now receive the Areas of Advance Award.</b></p>​<img src="/en/areas-of-advance/energy/news/PublishingImages/A_A_Elin-Esbjorner_2.jpg" alt="Elin Esbjörner " class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" style="margin:5px" /><span style="background-color:initial"><strong>They are from different research areas</strong>, but have shared lunch rooms for many years.</span><div>” We have talked for a long time about collaboration to test if Marcus' fluorescent short <span style="background-color:initial">RN</span><span style="background-color:initial">A could be used in live cells but have never had a platform for it. In 2017, we, together with other researcher at Chalmers and other Swedish universities, received a large research grant that made it possible,” s</span><span style="background-color:initial">ays Elin Esbjörner, associate professor at the Department of Biology and </span><span style="background-color:initial">Bio</span><span style="background-color:initial">locical</span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"> Engineering</span><span style="background-color:initial">.</span></div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>The FoRmulaEx research center</strong> was formed and a goal was set - if everything went well, they would have a method to produce fluorescent mRNA within six years.</div> <div>It took three.</div> <div>“mRNA is a molecule that assist in translating the genetic code to protein. It is used in Covid vaccines, but it also has great promise for cancer vaccines and to treat different types of genetic diseases. The potential is huge. But for this to work, these large and fragile molecules must become better at getting into the cells and reach their target. The functional uptake into the cells today is at best a few percent.”</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong><img src="/en/areas-of-advance/energy/news/PublishingImages/A-A_Marcus-Wilhelmsson_I0A4104.jpg" alt="Marcus Wilhelmsson" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" style="margin:5px" />This is where the fluorescent mRNA comes in</strong>. Marcus Wilhelmsson, professor at the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, explains that it behaves like a natural mRNA, even though one of RNA’s own building-blocks here is replaced by a corresponding fluorescent building-block that has been developed by the team.</div> <div>“In this way you can follow mRNA molecules into the cell and see how they are taken up. The method makes it easier for the pharmaceutical industry and academic research groups to accelerate the development of mRNA medicines,” says Marcus Wilhelmsson.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>To ensure that the method is utilized, the researchers have submitted a couple of patent applications and with the support of Chalmers Ventures and Chalmers Innovation Office, a company is being started up.</div> <div>“We are currently looking for a business developer and in a few weeks, the company will be up and running.”<br /><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>So how long can it take before</strong> the new technology can be on the market?</div> <div>“The fluorescent building block could be on the market within a year. Skilled labs around the world could use it to do their own investigations. A kit for the entire technology, which includes information about the production of the long mRNA strand, may take two years, says Marcus Wilhelmsson.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>The method has already received a lot of attention, not least since the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences (IVA) selected the project and the innovation for its annual 100 list. The Areas of Advance Award is another recognition that the results of their research which has also been done in collaboration with AstraZeneca, makes a difference.<br /><br /></div> <span style="background-color:initial"><strong>“Sweden is not known</strong> for having many academic prizes, so it is nice to get that attention. It´s an honor, especially when you think about the talented people who have received the award before. We are very proud”</span><div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><strong>Related:</strong><br /><a href="/en/centres/FoRmulaEx/Pages/default.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />The FoRmulaEx research center</a><br /><br />Text: Lars Nicklasson</span>​</div> ​Wed, 15 Sep 2021 17:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/ims/news/Pages/Janus-graphene-opens-doors-to-sustainable-sodium-ion-batteries.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/ims/news/Pages/Janus-graphene-opens-doors-to-sustainable-sodium-ion-batteries.aspxJanus graphene opens doors to sustainable batteries<p><b>​In the search for sustainable energy storage, researchers at Chalmers University of Technology present a new concept to fabricate high-performance electrode materials for sodium batteries. It is based on a novel type of graphene to store one of the world's most common and cheap metal ions – sodium. The results show that the capacity can match today’s lithium-ion batteries.</b></p><div>​Even though lithium ions work well for energy storage, lithium is an expensive metal with concerns regarding its long-term supply and environmental issues. <br /></div> <div> </div> <div><br /></div> <div> </div> <div>Sodium, on the other hand, is an abundant low-cost metal, and a main ingredient in seawater (and in kitchen salt). This makes sodium-ion batteries an interesting and sustainable alternative for reducing our need for critical raw materials. However, one major challenge is to increase the capacity.</div> <div> </div> <div><br /></div> <div> </div> <div>At the current level of performance, sodium-ion batteries cannot compete with lithium-ion cells. One limiting factor is the graphite, which is composed of stacked layers of graphene, and used as the anode in today’s lithium-ion batteries. <br /></div> <div> </div> <div><br /></div> <div> </div> <div>The ions intercalate in the graphite, which means that they can move in and out of the graphene layers and be stored for energy usage. Sodium ions are larger than lithium ions and interact differently. Therefore, they cannot be efficiently stored in the graphite structure. But the Chalmers researchers have come up with a novel way to solve this. <br /></div> <div> </div> <div><br /></div> <div> </div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/IMS/Material%20och%20tillverkning/Jinhua_Sun.jpg" alt="Jinhua Sun" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" style="margin:0px 25px;width:125px;height:145px" />“We have added a molecule spacer on one side of the graphene layer. When the layers are stacked together, the molecule creates larger space between graphene sheets and provides an interaction point, which leads to a significantly higher capacity,” says researcher Jinhua Sun at the Department of Industrial and Materials Science at Chalmers and first author of the scientific paper, published in Science Advances. </div> <div><br /></div> <div> </div> <div><h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">Ten times the energy capacity of standard graphite</h2></div> <div> </div> <div>Typically, the capacity of sodium intercalation in standard graphite is about 35 milliampere hours per gram (mA h g-1). This is less than one tenth of the capacity for lithium-ion intercalation in graphite. With the novel graphene the specific capacity for sodium ions is 332 milliampere hours per gram – approaching the value for lithium in graphite. The results also showed full reversibility and high cycling stability.</div> <div> </div> <div><br /></div> <div> </div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/IMS/Material%20och%20tillverkning/Aleksandar_Matic.jpg" alt="Aleksandar Matic" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" style="margin:0px 30px;width:125px;height:146px" />“It was really exciting when we observed the sodium-ion intercalation with such high capacity. The research is still at an early stage, but the results are very promising. This shows that it’s possible to design graphene layers in an ordered structure that suits sodium-ions, making it comparable to graphite,” says Professor Aleksandar Matic at the Department of Physics at Chalmers.</div> <div><br /></div> <div> </div> <div><br /></div> <div> </div> <div><h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">“Divine” Janus graphene opens doors to sustainable batteries</h2></div> <div> </div> <div>The study was initiated by Vincenzo Palermo in his previous role as Vice-Director of the Graphene Flagship, a European Commission-funded project coordinated by Chalmers University of Technology. <br /></div> <div> </div> <div> The novel graphene has asymmetric chemical functionalisation on opposite faces and is therefore often called Janus graphene, after the two-faced ancient Roman God Janus – the God of new beginnings, associated with doors and gates, and the first steps of a journey. In this case the Janus graphene correlates well with the roman mythology, potentially opening doors to high-capacity sodium-ion batteries. <br /></div> <div> </div> <div><br /></div> <div> </div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/IMS/Material%20och%20tillverkning/VincenzoPalermo.jpg" alt="Vincenzo Palermo" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" style="margin:5px 20px;width:140px;height:165px" /></div> <div><br /></div> <div>“Our Janus material is still far from industrial applications, but the new results show that we can engineer the ultrathin graphene sheets – and the tiny space in between them – for high-capacity energy storage. We are very happy to present a concept with cost-efficient, abundant and sustainable metals,” says Vincenzo Palermo, Affiliated Professor at the Department of Industrial and Materials Science at Chalmers.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><span><em>Text: Marcus Folino and Mia Halleröd Palmgren<br /></em></span></div> <div><span><em></em><span style="display:inline-block"></span></span><span><em>Image of Jinhua Sun: Marcus Folino<span style="display:inline-block"></span></em></span><em><span style="display:inline-block"></span><br /></em><div><em>Image of Aleksandar Matic: Anna-Lena Lundqvist<br /></em></div> <div><span><em>Image of Vincenzo Palermo: Graphene Flagship<span style="display:inline-block"></span></em></span><br /><em><span style="display:inline-block"></span></em></div> <br /></div> <div> </div> <div><br /></div> <div> </div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">More on the material: Janus graphene with a unique structure</h2> <div>The material used in the study has a unique artificial nanostructure. The upper face of each graphene sheet has a molecule that acts as both spacer and active interaction site for the sodium ions. Each molecule in between two stacked graphene sheets is connected by a covalent bond to the lower graphene sheet and interacts through electrostatic interactions with the upper graphene sheet. The graphene layers also have uniform pore size, controllable functionalisation density, and few edges. </div> <div> </div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">More on the research: </h2> <div>The scientific article <a href="https://doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.abf0812" title="Link to the scientific article">“Real-time imaging of Na+ reversible intercalation in “Janus” graphene stacks for battery applications”</a> was published in Science Advances and is written by Jinhua Sun, Matthew Sadd, Philip Edenborg, Henrik Grönbeck, Peter H. Thiesen, Zhenyuan Xia, Vanesa Quintano, Ren Qiu, Aleksandar Matic and Vincenzo Palermo. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>The researchers are active at the Department of Industrial and Materials Science, the Department of Physics and Competence Centre for Catalysis at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, Accurion GmbH, Germany and Institute of Organic Synthesis and Photoreactivity (ISOF) at the National Research Council of Italy.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>The research project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation program under GrapheneCore3 881603–Graphene Flagship, FLAG-ERA project PROSPECT, the Chalmers Foundation and the Swedish Research Council. The calculations were performed at C3SE (Gothenburg, Sweden) through an SNIC grant. This work was performed, in part, at Myfab Chalmers and Chalmers materials analysis laboratory. <br /></div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">For more information, please contact: </h3> <div><a href="/en/staff/Pages/jinhua.aspx">Jinhua Sun</a>, Researcher, Department of Industrial and Materials Science, Chalmers University of Technology, +46 76 960 99 56, <a href="mailto:%20jinhua@chalmers.se">jinhua@chalmers.se<br /></a></div> <div><a href="mailto:%20jinhua@chalmers.se"><br /></a></div> <div><a href="/en/staff/Pages/Aleksandar-Matic.aspx">Aleksandar Matic</a>, Professor, Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, +46 31 772 51 76, <a href="mailto:%20matic@chalmers.se">matic@chalmers.se</a></div> <div><br /> </div> <div><a href="/en/staff/Pages/Vincenzo-Palermo.aspx">Vincenzo Palermo</a>, Affiliated Professor, Department of Industrial and Materials Science, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden; Director, Institute for Organic Synthesis and Photoreactivity, CNR, Bologna, Italy, +39 051 639 97 73 or +39 051 639 98 53, <a href="mailto:%20palermo@chalmers.se">palermo@chalmers.se</a></div> <div> </div>Wed, 25 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/energy/news/Pages/Nanoscale-knowledge-of-grains--one-route-to-green-energy.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/energy/news/Pages/Nanoscale-knowledge-of-grains--one-route-to-green-energy.aspxNanoscale knowledge of grains – one route to green energy<p><b>​Christoph Langhammer is exploring boundaries. But they are not external boundaries; they are internal ones – inside the nanoparticles he is building to create high-speed ultra-sensitive hydrogen gas sensors. The materials behave differently at the boundaries. He wants to exploit these traits to improve the particles.</b></p>​“Over the past year interest in hydrogen has soared, not least in the EU, and more and more people are starting to realize that current hydrogen sensors are not good enough – and that sensors of this kind will be needed everywhere,” says Christoph Langhammer, <span style="background-color:initial">Pr</span><span style="background-color:initial">ofessor of Chemical Physics at Chalmers University of Technology and Wallenberg Academy Fellow 2016.<br /><br /><a href="https://kaw.wallenberg.org/en/research/nanoscale-knowledge-grains-one-route-green-energy"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Re​ad the full interview with Christoph Langhammer on kaw.wallenberg.org</a><br /></span>Thu, 22 Jul 2021 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/chem/news/Pages/New-electronic-paper-displays-brilliant-colours-.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/chem/news/Pages/New-electronic-paper-displays-brilliant-colours-.aspxNew electronic paper displays brilliant colours<p><b>​Imagine sitting out in the sun, reading a digital screen as thin as paper, but seeing the same image quality as if you were indoors. Thanks to research from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, it could soon be a reality.  A new type of reflective screen – sometimes described as ‘electronic paper’ – offers optimal colour display, while using ambient light to keep energy consumption to a minimum.​​</b></p><div>Traditional digital screens use a backlight to illuminate the text or images displayed upon them. This is fine indoors, but we’ve all experienced the difficulties of viewing such screens in bright sunshine. Reflective screens, however, attempt to use the ambient light, mimicking the way our eyes respond to natural paper.</div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/KB/Generell/Nyheter/elektroniska%20papper%20Anderas%20Dahlin/Marika_Gugole_220x230.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="Porträttbild Marika Gogole " style="margin:5px" /><br /><div>“For reflective screens to compete with the energy-intensive digital screens that we use today, images and colours must be reproduced with the same high quality. That will be the real breakthrough. Our research now shows how the technology can be optimised, making it attractive for commercial use,” says Marika Gugole, Doctoral Student at the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering at Chalmers University of Technology.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="https://news.cision.com/chalmers/r/bendable-electronic-paper-displays-whole-colour-range%2cc3179468">The researchers had already previously succeeded in developing an ultra-thin, flexible material that reproduces all the colours an LED screen can display, while requiring only a tenth of the energy that a standard tablet consumes</a>. But in the earlier design the colours on the reflective screen did not display with optimal quality. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.nanolett.1c00904" title="Link to scientific article ">Now the new study, published in the journal Nano Letters takes the material one step further. </a>Using a previously researched, porous and nanostructured material, containing tungsten trioxide, gold and platinum, they tried a new tactic – inverting the design in such a way as to allow the colours to appear much more accurately on the screen. <br /></div> <div><h2 class="chalmersElement-H2"></h2> <div><span lang="EN-GB"><h2 class="chalmersElement-H2"><span lang="EN-GB">Inverting the design for top quality colour​ </span></h2> </span></div> </div> <div><p class="MsoNormal"><span lang="EN-GB">The inversion of the design represents a great step forward. They placed the component which makes the material electrically conductive underneath the pixelated nanostructure that reproduces the colours – instead of above it, as was previously the case. This new design means you look directly at the pixelated surface, therefore seeing the colours much more clearly. </span></p></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><div><div>In addition to the minimal energy consumption, reflective screens have other advantages. For example, they are much less tiring for the eyes compared to looking at a regular screen.</div></div> <div><br /></div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/KB/Generell/Nyheter/elektroniska%20papper%20Anderas%20Dahlin/Andreas_Dahlin%20220x230.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="porträttbild Anderas Dahlin " style="margin:5px" />To make these reflective screens, certain rare metals are required – such as the gold and platinum – but because the final product is so thin, the amounts needed are very small. The researchers have high hopes that eventually, it will be possible to significantly reduce the quantities needed for production.<br /></div></div> <div><br /></div> <div>“Our main goal when developing these reflective screens, or ‘electronic paper’ as it is sometimes termed, is to find sustainable, energy-saving solutions. And in this case, energy consumption is almost zero because we simply use the ambient light of the surroundings,” explains research leader Andreas Dahlin, Professor at the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering at Chalmers.​</div> <div><h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">Flexible with a wide range of uses</h2></div> <div>Reflective screens are already available in some tablets today, but they only display the colours black and white well, which limits their use.<br /><br /></div> <div>“A large industrial player with the right technical competence could, in principle, start developing a product with the new technology within a couple of months,” says Andreas Dahlin, who envisions a number of further applications. In addition to smart phones and tablets, it could also be useful for outdoor advertising, offering energy and resource savings compared with both printed posters or moving digital screens.</div></div> <div><br /></div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">Update of this article: Next step taken – video speed operation in electronic papers </h2> <div> <div>Andreas Dahlin’s research group has together with colleagues from University of Cambridge, managed to reach video speed operation for electronic papers, in a new study <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/adma.202103217" title="Link to scientific article ">Video Speed Switching of Plasmonic Structural Colors with High Contrast and Superior Lifetime​</a>, <span style="background-color:initial">recently published in the journal Advances Materials . </span></div> <span></span><div></div></div> <div>​<br /></div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3"></h3> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">More about the research</h3> <div><ul> <li>​The technology in Chalmers researchers' reflective screens is based on the material's ability to regulate how light is absorbed and reflected. In the current study, tungsten trioxide is the core material, but in previous studies, researchers also used polymers. The material that covers the surface conducts electronic signals throughout the screen and can be patterned to create high-resolution images.<br /><br /></li> <li>The scientific article <a href="https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.nanolett.1c00904" title="Link to article "> <span>Electrochromi</span><span></span><span></span><span></span><span></span><span></span><span></span><span></span><span></span><span></span><span></span><span></span><span>c</span><span> Inorganic Nanostructures with High Chromaticity and Superior Brightness</span></a> has been published in Nano Letters and is written by Marika Gugole, Oliver Olsson, Stefano Rossi, Magnus P. Jonsson and Andreas Dahlin. The researchers are active at Chalmers University of Technology and Linköping University.​</li></ul></div> <div><div><div><p class="chalmersElement-P"></p> <ul><li><span style="background-color:initial">​The scientific article </span><span style="background-color:initial"><a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/adma.202103217" title="Link to scientific article ">Video Speed Switching of Plasmonic Structural Colors with High Contrast and Superior Lifetime​</a> </span><span style="background-color:initial">h</span><span style="background-color:initial">as been published in</span><span style="background-color:initial"> Advanced Materials </span><span style="background-color:initial">and is written by</span><span style="background-color:initial"> </span><span style="background-color:initial">Kunl</span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial">i</span><span style="background-color:initial"> Xiong, Oliver Olsson, Justas Svirelis, Chonnipa Palasingh, Jeremy Baumberg, Andreas Dahlin. </span><span style="background-color:initial">T</span><span style="background-color:initial">he researchers are active at Chalmers University of Technology and University of Cambridge.</span>​</li></ul> <span></span><p></p> </div> <div><p class="chalmersElement-P"><span></span></p></div> </div> <div><h3 class="chalmersElement-H3"> Contact <br /></h3></div> <div><a href="/sv/personal/Sidor/Andreas-Dahlin.aspx" title="Link to Anderas Dahln personal profile page "><span>A</span><span style="background-color:initial">ndre</span><span style="background-color:initial">as</span><span style="background-color:initial"> </span><span style="background-color:initial">Dahl</span><span style="background-color:initial">i</span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial">n</span><span style="background-color:initial"></span></a></div> <div>Professor, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology</div> <div><br /></div> <div>​​</div> <div><br /></div> </div> <div><div></div></div> <div>​​</div> ​​​​​​​​Mon, 12 Jul 2021 08:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/chem/news/Pages/Breakthrough-fortracking-RNA-with-fluorescence-.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/chem/news/Pages/Breakthrough-fortracking-RNA-with-fluorescence-.aspxBreakthrough for tracking RNA with fluorescence<p><b>​Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have succeeded in developing a method to label mRNA molecules, and thereby follow, in real time, their path through cells, using a microscope – without affecting their properties or subsequent activity. The breakthrough could be of great importance in facilitating the development of new RNA-based medicines.</b></p><div>RNA-based therapeutics offer a range of new opportunities to prevent, treat and potentially cure diseases. But currently, the delivery of RNA therapeutics into the cell is inefficient. For new therapeutics to fulfil their potential, the delivery methods need to be optimised. Now, a new method, recently presented in the highly regarded Journal of the American Chemical Society, can provide an important piece of the puzzle of overcoming these challenges and take the development a major step forward.<img class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/KB/Generell/Nyheter/Marcus%20Wilhelmsson%20spåra%20RNA%20i%20celler/Marcus%20Wilhelmsson_320x320.jpg" alt="" style="height:189px;width:189px;margin:5px" /><br /></div> <div> </div> <div>&quot;Since our method can help solve one of the biggest problems for drug discovery and development, we see<br />that this research can facilitate a paradigm shift from traditional drugs to RNA-based therapeutics,&quot; says Marcus Wilhelmsson, Professor at the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering at Chalmers University of Technology, and one of the main authors of the article. </div> <div> </div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">Making mRNA fluorescent without affecting its natural activity</h2> <div>The research behind the method has been done in collaboration with chemists and biologists at Chalmers and the biopharmaceuticals company AstraZeneca, through their joint research centre, <a href="/en/centres/FoRmulaEx/Pages/default.aspx">FoRmulaEx</a>, as well as a research group at the Pasteur Institute, Paris.</div> <div> </div> <div>The method involves replacing one of the building blocks of RNA with a fluorescent variant, which, apart from that feature, maintains the natural properties of the original base. The fluorescent units have been developed with the help of a special chemistry, and the researchers have shown that it can then be used to produce messenger RNA (mRNA), without affecting the mRNA’s ability to be translated into a protein at natural speed. This represents a breakthrough which has never before been done successfully. The fluorescence furthermore allows the researchers to follow functional mRNA molecules in real time, seeing how they are taken up into cells with the help of a microscope.</div> <div> </div> <div>A challenge when working with mRNA is that the molecules are very large and charged, but at the same time fragile. They cannot get into cells directly and must therefore be packaged. The method that has proven most successful to date uses very small droplets known as lipid nanoparticles to encapsulate the mRNA. There is still a great need to develop new and more efficient lipid nanoparticles – something which the Chalmers researchers are also working on. To be able to do that, it is necessary to understand how mRNA is taken up into cells. The ability to monitor, in real time, how the lipid nanoparticles and mRNA are distributed through the cell is therefore an important tool.</div> <div> <img class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/KB/Generell/Nyheter/Marcus%20Wilhelmsson%20spåra%20RNA%20i%20celler/Elin%20Esbjorner%20320x320.jpg" width="320" height="194" alt="" style="height:181px;width:181px;margin:5px" /></div> <div>“The great benefit of this method is that we can now easily see where in the cell the delivered mRNA goes, <br /><br />and in which cells the protein is formed, without losing RNA's natural protein-translating ability,” says Elin Esbjörner, Associate Professor at the Department for Biology and Biotechnology and the second lead author of the article.</div> <div><div> </div></div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">Crucial information for optimising drug discovery</h2> <div>Researchers in this area can use the method to gain greater knowledge of how the uptake process works, thus accelerating and streamlining the new medicines’ discovery process. The new method provides more accurate and detailed knowledge than current methods for studying RNA under a microscope.</div> <div> </div> <div>“Until now, it has not been possible to measure the natural rate and efficiency with which RNA acts in the cell. This means that you get the wrong answers to the questions you ask when trying to develop a new drug. For example, if you want an answer to what rate a process takes place at, and your method gives you an answer that is a fifth of the correct, drug discovery becomes difficult,” explains Marcus Wilhelmsson.</div> <div> </div> <div>On the way to utilisation – directly into IVA’s top 100 list</div> <div> </div> <div>When the researchers realised what a difference their method could make and how important the new knowledge is for the field, they made their results available as quickly as possible. Recently, the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences (IVA) included the project in its annual 100 list and also highlighted it as particularly important for increasing societal resilience to crises. To ensure useful commercialisation of the method, the researchers have submitted a patent application and are planning for a spin-off company, with the support of the business incubator Chalmers Ventures and the Chalmers Innovation Office.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="https://blogs.sciencemag.org/pipeline/archives/2021/04/05/watching-mrna-do-its-thing-in-living-cells">The research was also featured in the academic journal Science Translational Medicine's popular &quot;In The Pipeline&quot; blog as a particularly exciting contribution to the field of research</a></div> <div> </div> <div><a href="https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/jacs.1c00014">Read the scientific article in the Journal of the American Chemical Society (JACS)</a></div> <div> </div> <div>For more information, contact:</div> <div> </div> <div>Marcus Wilhelmsson, Professor, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, <span class="baec5a81-e4d6-4674-97f3-e9220f0136c1" style="white-space:nowrap">+46 31 722 3051<a title="Ring: +46 31 722 3051" href="#" style="overflow:hidden;border-width:medium;border-style:none;border-color:initial;height:16px;width:16px;vertical-align:middle;white-space:nowrap;float:none;margin:0px;display:inline;position:static !important"><img title="Ring: +46 31 722 3051" alt="" style="overflow:hidden;border-width:medium;border-style:none;border-color:initial;height:16px;width:16px;vertical-align:middle;white-space:nowrap;float:none;margin:0px;display:inline;position:static !important" /></a></span>, marcus.wilhelmsson@chalmers.se</div> <div> </div> <div>Elin Esbjörner, Associate Professor, Department of Biology and Biotechnology, Chalmers University of Technology, <span class="baec5a81-e4d6-4674-97f3-e9220f0136c1" style="white-space:nowrap">+46 21-772 51 20<a title="Ring: +46 21-772 51 20" href="#" style="overflow:hidden;border-width:medium;border-style:none;border-color:initial;height:16px;width:16px;vertical-align:middle;white-space:nowrap;float:none;margin:0px;display:inline;position:static !important"><img title="Ring: +46 21-772 51 20" alt="" style="overflow:hidden;border-width:medium;border-style:none;border-color:initial;height:16px;width:16px;vertical-align:middle;white-space:nowrap;float:none;margin:0px;display:inline;position:static !important" /></a></span>, eline@chalmers.se</div> ​​Wed, 30 Jun 2021 08:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/bio/news/Pages/Monitoring-mRNA-to-time-its-great-escape-perfectly.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/bio/news/Pages/Monitoring-mRNA-to-time-its-great-escape-perfectly.aspxMonitoring mRNA to time its great escape perfectly<p><b>​​The ease by which mRNA-based drugs are taken up by cells in tissues is crucial to their therapeutic effectiveness. Now, a new detection method developed by researchers at Chalmers and AstraZeneca could lead to faster and better development of the small droplets known as lipid nanoparticles, which are the main method used to package mRNA for delivery to the cells.​</b></p><p class="chalmersElement-P"><span><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/Bio/ChemBio/michael.munson@astrazeneca.com-001350x305.jpg" alt="Photo of Michael Munson" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" style="margin:5px;width:250px;height:218px" />“We have developed an automated process to monitor and test large numbers of different lipid nanoparticles simultaneously, which we hope will streamline the development of new medicines,” says <strong>Michael Munson</strong>, Postdoctoral Fellow at AstraZeneca R&amp;D, who is affiliated to the research centre FoRmulaEx, and is the first author of the study that was recently published in the journal Nature Communications Biology.</span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span>Messenger RNA, or mRNA, is the code used by cells to produce proteins. When it is introduced as a drug or a vaccine, it is interpreted by the cells as a set of instructions, to then use their own systems to produce the desired proteins.</span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial">mRNA-based technologies are</span><span style="background-color:initial"> being explored for their potential to help treat chronic diseases in various ways, such as by encoding therapeutic proteins, and potentially be tailored for specific tissues, for example to replace incorrect proteins or regulate cellular malfunctions that cause disease.</span></p> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2"><span>mRNA molecules are packed into lipid nanoparticles ​</span></h2> <div> </div> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <div> </div> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span>But the</span><span>re are several major challenges associated with this new technology. First, the cells must be ‘tricked’ into taking in the mRNA molecules. One of the most advanced ways of doing this is to pack the mRNA into a small droplet, known as a lipid nanoparticle. The nanoparticles enter cells in a large bubble called an endosome, which transports its contents to the cell's ‘lysosomes’, or degradation stations. </span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span>The lipid nanoparticles containing the mRNA must exit the endosome at just the right moment, to reach the cell's cytoplasm, where the proteins are made, before the endosome reaches the degradation station. Otherwise, the mRNA will break down and no longer be able to work. This vital step is called ‘endosomal escape’ and timing it correctly is the most decisive factor for mRNA-based medicines to work. </span></p> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2"><span>Tracking the escape</span></h2> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <p class="chalmersElement-P">The new study describes a method that the researchers developed to screen lipid nanoparticles for optimization of mRNA delivery. The method makes it possible to monitor the cell uptake, endosomal escape and delivery of mRNA in hundreds of samples at a time. To achiev​e this, the researchers combined fluorescence reporters to track the movement of the lipid nanoparticles through the cell, for protein expression and the endosomal escape events. The endosomal escape marker consists of a fluorescent variant of the protein Galectin-9 which accumulates at ruptured endosomes and <a href="https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-15300-1">was adapted from work published by a research group in Lund​</a>.</p> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial">“Instead of just seeing which lipid nanoparticles work best, we can now also understand what makes them work optimally, and use that knowledge to develop and test new improved nanoparticle formulations,” says Michael Munson.</span></p> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2"><span>Endosomal escape must be optimally timed​</span><span><br /></span></h2> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial"><strong>Elin Esbjörner</strong>, Associate Professor of Chemical Biology at Chalmers and co-author of<img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/Bio/ChemBio/Elin%20Esbjorner_1_350x305.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="Photo of Elin Esbjörner" style="margin:5px;width:250px;height:218px" /> the study, explains the importance of delivering the mRNA to the target cells as precisely as possible: </span></p> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial">“To redu</span><span style="background-color:initial">ce the risk of side effects, such as the immune system being triggered by the lipid particles, we want to use the lowest possible dose. This is particularly true for diseases which require long term treatment. In those cases, it is vital that the moment of endosomal escape is optimally timed, to allow the mRNA to get out into the cytoplasm with maximum effect,” she says. </span></p> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial">In addition to allowing the researchers to evaluate a large number of lipid particles at the same time, the new method can also help examine how efficiently the lipid particles are delivered and how well they function in different types of cells. This could allow for tailoring the drugs to target specific tissues, such as in the lungs or the liver.</span></p> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial">“The lipid nanoparticles work differently in different cell types. A formulation that works well for delivery to liver cells, for example, could be significantly different in lung cells. Our new method could help us understand why such differences exist, and to harness this knowledge to design new lipid nanoparticles tailored for different targets in the body,” says Elin Esbjörner.</span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="font-weight:700">Photo of Michael Munson: </span>AstraZeneca<br /><span style="font-weight:700">Ph</span><span style="font-weight:700">oto of</span><span style="font-weight:700"> Elin Esbjörner: </span>Mikael WInters​<span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></p> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></p> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial"><strong>Read the scientific article: </strong><a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s42003-021-01728-8#Sec9">A high-throughput Galectin-9 imaging assay for quantifying nanoparticle uptake, endosomal escape and functional RNA delivery</a></span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><br /></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><strong style="background-color:initial">About FoRmulaEx:</strong><span style="background-color:initial"> <br /></span><a href="/en/centres/FoRmulaEx/Pages/default.aspx"><span>FoRmulaEx ​</span>​</a><span style="background-color:initial">is an industrial research center for functional RNA delivery. The three academic partners are Chalmers University of Technology, the University of Gothenburg and the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, carrying out research in close collaboration with AstraZeneca, Vironova, Camarus and Nanolyze. The purpose is to contribute the foundational knowledge required to design safe and effective drug deliveries for the next generation of nucleotide drugs.</span></p> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p>Wed, 09 Jun 2021 09:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/Many-Chalmers-research-projects-in-IVA's-100-list-2021.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/Many-Chalmers-research-projects-in-IVA's-100-list-2021.aspxChalmers well represented in IVA's 100 list 2021<p><b>​Antibiotic resistance, diagnosis of infections, battery technologies and mRNA-based medicines – just some of the Chalmers projects featured in the annual 100-list from the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences (IVA).</b></p><div>The 100-list highlights up-to-date research with business potential from Swedish universities. The theme for 2021 is Sustainable Crisis Preparedness, and eleven Chalmers researchers have been selected. The researchers have contributed with research projects that offer great value and potential for utilisation for society,</div> <div>through avenues such as industrial commercialisation, business development or other types of impact<br /></div> <div><br /></div> “I am delighted that we have such a good representation in the IVA-list  this year as well. Chalmers has a long tradition of utilisation and innovation,” says Fredrik Hörstedt, Vice President of Utilisation at Chalmers University of Technology. &quot;For Chalmers it is natural that the research also has an impact on wider society and creates value for society.&quot; <br /><div><br />The selected projects from Chalmers 2021:<div><div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div><h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">Architecture and Civil Engineering</h2></div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">​​</span><span style="background-color:initial">SINOM: A platform for strategic maintenance and renovation planning of housing portfolios - </span><a href="/en/staff/Pages/Claudio-Nägeli.aspx">Claudio Nägeli</a> and <a href="/en/Staff/Pages/abolfazl-farahani.aspx">Abolfazi Farahani</a><span>​<br /></span></div> <div><a href="/en/departments/ace/news/Pages/Research-that-contributes-to-sustainable-emergency-readiness-.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Awarded innovations by ACE researchers</a> <br /><span></span></div> <div> </div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">Computer Science and Engineering</h2> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"> </span><a href="/en/staff/Pages/russo.aspx">Alejandro Russo</a><span>​</span></div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">Cyber security for critical social infrastructure - </span><a href="/en/staff/Pages/magnus-almgren.aspx">Magnus Almgren​</a><br /></div> <div> </div> <div>Re<span style="background-color:initial">ad more:</span></div> <div> </div> <div><div><a><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Two projects from Computer Science and Engineering on IVA's 100 list</a></div></div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">Industrial and Materials Science </h2> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">​</span><span style="background-color:initial">Design for energy resilience in the everyday -</span><a href="/en/staff/Pages/helena-stromberg.aspx"> Helena Strömberg</a></div> <div>Read more:<br /><a href="/en/departments/ims/news/Pages/Design-for-energyresilience-in-the-everyday.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" /><span><span style="background-color:initial">Design for energy resilience in the everyday<span style="display:inline-block"></span></span></span></a><br /></div> <div> </div> <div></div> <div> </div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">​Physics </h2> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">​</span><span style="background-color:initial">CARBAT - Calcium Rechargeable Battery Technology - </span><a href="/en/staff/Pages/Patrik-Johansson0603-6580.aspx">Patrik Johansson​</a><br /></div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div>Read more:</div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div><a href="/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Next-generation-battery-makes-it-to-IVA-100-List.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" /> Next generation battery makes it to IVA 100 List</a></div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">Chemistry and Chemical Engineering </h2> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">Material fo</span><span style="background-color:initial">r combating antibiotic resistance - </span><a href="/en/staff/Pages/Martin-Andersson.aspx">Martin Andersson</a></div> <div> </div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">V</span><span style="background-color:initial">ividye: Sustainable and reversible colouring of textiles -</span><a href="/en/staff/Pages/Romain-Bordes.aspx"> Romain Bordes</a></div> <div> </div> <span style="background-color:initial">Read more:</span><br /> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div><a href="/en/departments/chem/news/Pages/global-health-and-sustainable-textile-industry-on-IVA%27s-100-list.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Innovations for global health and sustainable textiles at IVA's 100 list​</a></div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div><p class="chalmersElement-P"><span></span></p> <div> </div> <div> </div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">Chemistry and <span>Biology and Biological Engineering</span></h2> <div><span></span> <span>N</span><span>aturalistic fluorescent marking of mRNA -  a technology for studying RNA-based medicines and vaccines -</span><a href="/en/staff/Pages/marcus-wilhelmsson.aspx"> Marcus Wilhelmsson,</a> and <a href="/en/Staff/Pages/Elin-Esbjörner-Winters.aspx">Elin Esbjörner.</a></div></div> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <div> </div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">Read more:</span><br /></div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div><a href="/en/departments/chem/news/Pages/global-health-and-sustainable-textile-industry-on-IVA%27s-100-list.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Innovations for global health and sustainable textiles at IVA's 100 list​</a><a href="/en/departments/chem/news/Pages/global-health-and-sustainable-textile-industry-on-IVA%27s-100-list.aspx"><span style="display:inline-block"></span></a></div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">Microtechnology and Nanoscience </h2> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">V</span><span style="background-color:initial">idem - Fast and secure diagnosis of </span><span style="background-color:initial;display:inline-block">infectious diseases </span><span style="background-color:initial">-</span><span style="background-color:initial"> </span><a href="/en/staff/Pages/Dag-Winkler.aspx">Dag Winkler</a><br /></div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">Read m</span><span style="background-color:initial">ore:</span><br /></div> <div> </div> <div><div><a href="/en/departments/mc2/news/Pages/Fast-sensitive-and-reliable-test-of-viral-infections-on-this-year%27s-IVA-list.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Fast, sensitive and reliable test of viral infections on this year's IVA-list </a></div></div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">Technology Management and Economics </h2> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">​Life cycle analysis and circularity for electric vehicles - batteries, electric motors and electronics - </span><a href="/en/staff/Pages/anders-nordelof.aspx">Anders Nordelöf</a><span style="background-color:initial">​</span></div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">R</span><span style="background-color:initial">ead more:</span><br /></div> <div> </div> <div><div><a href="/en/areas-of-advance/energy/news/Pages/Contributes-to-the-EUs-work-to-electrify-the-transport-sector.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Contributes to the EU’s work to electrify the transport sector </a></div> <div><a href="/en/departments/tme/news/Pages/Electric-cars-can-become-more-eco-friendly-through-life-cycle-assessment.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Electric cars can become more eco-friendly through life cycle assessment </a></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">​</span></div></div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div><br /></div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">Alumni</h2> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">​</span><span style="background-color:initial">Refrigeration for a balanced electricity network - </span><a href="/en/staff/Pages/tommiem.aspx">Tommie Månsson</a><span style="background-color:initial">​</span></div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div><br /></div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div><br /></div></div> <div><br /></div></div> <div><em>IVA’s 100 List presents selected research projects believed to have the potential to be developed into innovations, to promote business development or to provide other benefits. The list reflects a diverse range of research projects and researcher expertise from Sweden’s universities in a given field.<br /></em><br /></div> <div><a href="https://www.iva.se/projekt/research2business/ivas-100-lista-2021/" target="_blank"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />The complete list can be found on www.iva.se</a></div>Mon, 10 May 2021 03:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/research/strong/nano/news/Pages/excellence_phd_position_winner_to_mc2.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/research/strong/nano/news/Pages/excellence_phd_position_winner_to_mc2.aspxExcellence PhD position winner to MC2<p><b>​​“In order to fully understand how devices work, it is very important that we know what happens at the most fundamental scale - nano scale. How electrons behave, how materials interact - analogous to what Antoine de Saint-Exupery wrote: 'What is essential is invisible to the eye'”. That’s how Roselle Ngaloy, one of three Excellence PhD Position winners 2021, motivates her aspiration to pursue a research career in the field of nano. ​</b></p><strong>​<img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/MC2/QDPL/Roselle.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:200px;height:265px" /></strong><span style="background-color:initial"><strong>Congratulations, Roselle! What was your immediate reaction when you found out you were one of the Excellence PhD position winners? </strong></span><div>“I was overwhelmed when I received the call, it was unbelievable. Nonetheless, I was very happy to share the news with my family. I cannot express how grateful I am to be given this opportunity. Now that everything has settled a bit, I am enjoying the last months of my master study while looking forward to the start of a new research journey.” </div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>And what will be the research subject for your future PhD? </strong></div> <div>“For my PhD, I plan to work on several stacks of 2D materials with graphene to investigate spin transport while incorporating different effects - proximity effect, spin-orbit coupling, moire pattern in bilayer graphene - in one device.”</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>How come you decided to apply for the Nano Excellence PhD position? </strong></div> <div>“As I was working on my master thesis, I came to appreciate the complexity and potential of spintronics and the challenge that comes with doing fundamental research in this field. I wanted to continue working in this field and in the same group, supervised by Saroj Dash, as I find the working dynamics of the group to be conducive. Luckily, the research field is well-aligned with the initiative of Nano Excellence PhD, and so I took the chance and applied for it.” </div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>What made you get into the nano field in the first place? What’s the attraction?</strong></div> <div>“After my bachelor study, I was briefly hired as a research assistant at my university in the Philippines. During my work, I came to realize that I needed to hone my knowledge and skills to be an effective researcher. In order to fully understand how devices work, it is very important to know what happens at the most fundamental scale - nano scale. How electrons behave, how materials interact - analogous to what Antoine de Saint-Exupery wrote: 'What is essential is invisible to the eye'. And so, I applied for Erasmus Mundus Master Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, which started my career in the Nano field.” </div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>What are your long-term hopes and future prospects?</strong></div> <div>“For the future, I can still see myself in the academia. I enjoy the learning environment that universities foster while having the independence to do research.” </div> <div><br /></div> <div>Thank you and – again - congratulations, Roselle! </div> Thu, 29 Apr 2021 14:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/ims/news/Pages/Mechanical-engineering-students-develop-products-preventing-dementia.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/ims/news/Pages/Mechanical-engineering-students-develop-products-preventing-dementia.aspxMechanical eng students develop products preventing dementia<p><b>​During the second year in the bachelor program of the Mechanical Engineering program, the course Integrated design and manufacturing is given. The students work in groups to develop concept proposals to develop a real existing product or find a completely new solution based on a need. All products and needs come from business or society to the course as realistic as possible. This year, one of the problem formulations was about something that usually isn’t associated with mechanical engineering, namely, to counteract dementia. </b></p><div>​Erney Mattsson is professor and consultant in vascular surgery. He is a leader within a course called &quot;Experts in Teams&quot;. He covers the subject &quot;Innovation in Healthcare&quot; &quot; in that course, at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU). Innovation in Healthcare is a thematic area where students from different disciplines are mixed with the task of solving a health problem regardless of previous medical knowledge. </div> <div> </div> <div><br /> </div> <div> </div> <div>– This diversity of different knowledge and inputs has meant that we have developed completely unique products. In the same way, I am convinced that the mechanical engineering students at Chalmers are well suited for medical development because they have completely open eyes and knowledge to develop prototypes and potential solutions, says Erney Mattsson.</div> <div><br /></div> <div> </div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/IMS/Produktutveckling/ErneyMattsson_image.jpg" alt="Erney Mattsson" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" style="margin:5px 15px;width:170px;height:215px" />Erney develops various medical problem formulations for the course Integrated design and manufacturing. Previous projects with Erney’s involvement have among other things resulted in sound-insulated folding walls and heating blankets. The product concepts that were developed were solutions to real needs in healthcare where there were privacy problems, and difficulties in keeping the body temperature of the patients. Some of the projects have been so successful that they have resulted in master thesis projects. Erney himself has good practical experience of developing medical technology products together with engineers. For example, a collaboration with the professor in mathematics Torbjörn Lundh, which resulted in a patent for an artificial blood vessel, a so-called vascular prosthesis. </div> <div><br /></div> <div> </div> <div>- To me, diversity is a great strength and it was something I really discovered when working with engineers. I think this approach will become more and more common, says Erney. </div> <div><br /></div> <div> </div> <div><h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">Different problems can be solved with the same process </h2></div> <div>The project assignments in the course vary from year to year since they are all based on real world applications. It can be about improving an existing product or having a more open solution to a current need. One of this year's project tasks is to develop a product that counteracts dementia. This may not be something that one think is traditionally linked to the mechanical engineering program. But the students have used the same methodical design process as in any other type of product development. This approach provides valuable experience and insights into how product development and group dynamics work in real life. The project groups have worked to develop concepts for how to meet the need for, in this case, cognitive stimulation.</div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/IMS/Produktutveckling/funktionellt-diagram.jpg" alt="Functional diagram" style="margin:5px" /><br /><em>Above: A functional diagram that can be applied to all product development.</em><br /><br /></div> <div>Most of the groups that worked to counteract dementia came up with some form of app solution where the cognitive ability can be developed and tested. Some groups also had physical products such as a cognitively challenging card game and a &quot;brain calendar&quot; with prompts and tips on daily physical and cognitive activities.</div> <div><div><p class="chalmersElement-P"><br /></p></div></div> <div> </div> <div>Elin Skönborg comes from Stockholm and attended an aesthetic program in upper secondary school. Elin felt that she wanted to study something more technical and decided to choose the Mechanical Engineering program at Chalmers.</div> <div><br /></div> <div> </div> <div>– I’m happy with the Mechanical Engineering program and I have learned a lot. There is so much work put into products that you do not think about. A course like this is challenging because we do not have much knowledge about dementia from the beginning and the solution is quite open. But we have used the tools we received on the course and become more comfortable the more we have worked with the problem. It has also been fun to work in a group where you don’t know everyone from the beginning, says Elin. </div> <div> </div> <div>Johan Brasch comes from the city of Värnamo and wanted to study something that was broad and concrete and practical, which led to the Mechanical Engineering program at Chalmers. </div> <div><br /></div> <div> </div> <div>– We had a hard time in the beginning because this project was a little different compared to a &quot;normal&quot; mechanical problem. But we scaled it down in a way that suited us and used the methods we were taught, and it worked out in the end. I thought it was interesting to see that you can tackle different problems with these methods by working purposefully and systematically. Of course, it was difficult at first since the solution could be so open, but developing an existing product involves other types of difficulties, says Johan. </div> <div><br /></div> <div><h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">Complete product solutions require collaboration across subject boundaries<br /></h2></div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/IMS/Produktutveckling/ErikHultén_400x600px.jpg" alt="Erik Hultén" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" style="margin:15px;width:245px;height:371px" />Erik Hulthén, coordinator of the Mechanical Engineering program, believes that the program is broader than generally perceived.</div> <div><br /></div> <div> </div> <div>– Products consist of so much more than technical details. We must be able to design complete solutions that include identifying the customer and their needs. As a result, the solutions will often also go beyond the subject boundaries. We generally need to become better at bridging between different disciplines in product development, says Erik.</div> <div> </div> <div>The collaboration with Erney Mattsson was established after Erik visited NTNU and saw how interdisciplinary they worked with medical technology solutions, and the good results that followed with it. </div> <div><br /></div> <div> </div> <div>– Erney is an interesting project developer because his background at NTNU provides different inputs for how to think about projects like this. I think we will see more types of such collaborations in the future. Medical technology is an area that there is every reason for mechanical engineers to work more with, says Erik.<br /></div> <div> </div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">More about the course Integrated design and manufacturing</h2> <div>The aim of the project course is to provide possibilities for the students to participate in industry-related product development projects, to train problem-oriented learning and to act in a project environment. The projects have focus on early product development, i.e concept study phases and test and evaluation of physical prototypes or simulation models, and value-based management. </div> Wed, 28 Apr 2021 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/research/strong/nano/news/Pages/excellence_phd_position_winners.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/research/strong/nano/news/Pages/excellence_phd_position_winners.aspxExcellence PhD position winners<p><b>​​Every year the Excellence Initiative Nano (EI Nano) opens several so-called Excellence PhD positions. This year more than 300 excellent students applied! After reviewing the applications, eight were interviewed and finally three were selected. </b></p><div><span style="background-color:initial">With a</span><span style="background-color:initial">n Excellence PhD student position, the student has her/his own funding, which gives far more freedom in choosing both research group and research projects.</span><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>The selected students are:</strong></div> <div>Roselle Ngaloy, currently at Chalmers through the Erasmus Mundus Nano program. She chooses Saroj Dash at MC2 as her supervisor.</div> <div>Eric Nilsson, from the Physics program at Chalmers. He chooses Ulf Gran at Physics as his supervisor.</div> <span style="background-color:initial">Evgeniya Pavlova from Moscow State University. She chooses Fredrik Westerlund from Biology and Biological Engineering as her supervisor.</span>Mon, 26 Apr 2021 03:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/ict/news/Pages/Call-for-ICT-seed-projects-2022.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/ict/news/Pages/Call-for-ICT-seed-projects-2022.aspxCall for ICT seed projects 2022<p><b> Call for proposals within ICT strategic areas and involving interdisciplinary approaches.​</b></p><h3 class="chalmersElement-H3" style="color:rgb(153, 51, 0)"><span style="color:rgb(153, 51, 0)">The application date has expired!</span></h3> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">Important dates:</h3> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div><ul><li><b>Submission date: </b><span style="text-decoration:line-through">April 29, 2021</span></li> <li><b>Notification:</b> mid-June, 2021</li> <li><b>Expected start of the project:</b> January 2022</li></ul></div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">Background</h3> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div><b>The Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Area of Advance</b> (AoA) provides financial support for SEED projects, i.e., projects involving innovative ideas that can be a starting point for further collaborative research and joint funding applications. </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div>We will prioritize research projects that <strong>involve researchers from different research communities</strong> (for example across ICT departments or between ICT and other Areas of Advances) and who have not worked together before (i.e., have no joint projects/publications). </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div>Research projects involving a <strong>gender-balanced team and younger researchers</strong>, e.g., assistant professors, will be prioritized. Additionally, proposals related to <strong>sustainability</strong> and the UN Sustainable Development Goals are encouraged.</div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div><b><em>Note: </em></b><em>Only researchers employed at Chalmers can apply and can be funded. PhD students cannot be supported by this call.  Applicants and co-applicants of research proposals funded in the 2020 and 2021 ICT SEED calls cannot apply. </em></div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div><em><br /></em></div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div><b>The total budget of the call is 1 MSEK.</b> We expect to fund 3-5 projects</div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">Details of the call</h3> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div><ul><li>The project should include at least two researchers from different divisions at Chalmers (preferably two different departments) and who should have complementary expertise, and no joint projects/publications.</li> <li>Proposals involving teams with good gender balance and involving assistant professors will be prioritized.</li> <li>The project should contribute to sustainable development. </li> <li>The budget must be between 100 kSEK and 300 kSEK, including indirect costs (OH). The budget is mainly to cover personnel costs for Chalmers employees (but not PhD students). The budget cannot cover costs for equipment or travel costs to conferences/research visits. </li> <li>The project must start in early 2022 and should last 3-6 months. </li></ul></div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">What must the application contain?</h3> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div>The application should be at most 3 pages long, font Times–roman, size 11. In addition, max 1 page can be used for references. Finally, an additional one-page CV of each one of the applicants must be included (max 4 CVs). Proposals that do not comply with this format will be desk rejected (no review process).</div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div>The proposal should include:</div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div>a)<span style="white-space:pre"> </span>project title </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div>b)<span style="white-space:pre"> </span>name, e-mail, and affiliation (department, division) of the applicants</div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div>c)<span style="white-space:pre"> </span>the research challenges addressed and the objective of the project; interdisciplinary aspects should be highlighted; also the applicant should discuss how the project contributes to sustainable development, preferably in relation to the <a href="https://www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/sustainable-development-goals/" title="link to UN webpage">UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDG)</a>. Try to be specific and list the targets within each Goal that are addressed by your project.</div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div>d)<span style="white-space:pre"> </span>the project description </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div>e)<span style="white-space:pre"> </span>the expected outcome (including dissemination plan) and the plan for further research and funding acquisition</div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div>f)<span style="white-space:pre"> </span>the project participants and the planned efforts</div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div>g)<span style="white-space:pre"> </span>the project budget and activity timeline
</div> <div><div><br /></div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">Evaluation Criteria</h3> <div><ul><li>Team composition</li> <li>Interdisciplinarity</li> <li>Novelty</li> <li>Relevance to AoA ICT and Chalmers research strategy as well as to SDG</li> <li>Dissemination plan</li> <li>Potential for further research and joint funding applications</li> <li>Budget and project feasibility​</li></ul></div></div> <div><span style="color:rgb(33, 33, 33);font-family:inherit;font-size:16px;font-weight:600;background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="color:rgb(33, 33, 33);font-family:inherit;font-size:16px;font-weight:600;background-color:initial">Submission</span></div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div>The application should be submitted as one PDF document to</div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span><span lang="EN-GB"><a href="https://easychair.org/my/conference?conf=seed2022">https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=seed2022</a></span></span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span><br /></span></p> <div> </div> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">The proposals will be evaluated by the AoA ICT management group and selected Chalmers researchers.

</span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><b><br /></b></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><b>Questions</b> can be addressed to <a href="mailto:erik.strom@chalmers.se">Erik Ström</a> or <a href="mailto:durisi@chalmers.se">Giuseppe Durisi​</a> </span></div> <div> </div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">General information about the ICT Area of Advance can be found at <a href="/en/areas-of-advance/ict/Pages/default.aspx">www.chalmers.se/ict ​</a></span><br /></div> <div> </div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div> </div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Areas%20of%20Advance/Information%20and%20Communication%20Technology/About%20us/IKT_logo_600px.jpg" alt="" /><span style="background-color:initial">​​<br /></span></div>Mon, 01 Mar 2021 00:00:00 +0100https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/mc2/news/Pages/Cooling-electronics-efficiently-with-graphene-enhanced-heat-pipes.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/mc2/news/Pages/Cooling-electronics-efficiently-with-graphene-enhanced-heat-pipes.aspxCooling electronics efficiently with graphene-enhanced heat pipes<p><b>​Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have found that graphene-based heat pipes can help solve the problems of cooling electronics and power systems used in avionics, data centres, and other power electronics. &quot;Heat pipes are one of the most efficient tools for this because of their high efficiency and unique ability to transfer heat over a large distance,&quot; says Johan Liu, Professor of Electronics Production, at the Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience – MC2, at Chalmers. The results, which also involved researchers in China and Italy, were recently published in the scientific Open Access journal Nano Select.</b></p><div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/MC2/News/jliu_2016_350x305.jpg" alt="Picture of Johan Liu." class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" style="margin:5px" />Electronics and data centres need to be efficiently cooled in order to work properly. Graphene enhanced heat pipes can solve these issues. Currently, heat pipes are usually made of copper, aluminium or their alloys. Due to the relatively high density and limited heat transmission capacity of these materials, heat pipes are facing severe challenges in future power devices and data centres.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><em>(Picture to the right: Prof. Johan Liu)</em><br /> </div> <div> </div> <div>Large data centres that deliver, for example, digital banking services and video streaming websites are extremely energy-intensive, and an environmental culprit that emits more than the aviation industry. Reducing the climate footprint of this industry is therefore vital. The researchers’ discoveries here could make a significant energy efficiency contribution to these data centres, and in other applications too.</div> <div> </div> <div>The graphene-enhanced heat pipe exhibits a specific thermal transfer coefficient which is about 3.5 times better than that of copper-based heat pipe. The new findings pave the way for using graphene enhanced heat pipes in lightweight and large capacity cooling applications, as required in many applications such as avionics, automotive electronics, laptop computers, handsets, data centres as well as space electronics.</div> <div> </div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/MC2/News/ya_liu_350x305.jpg" alt="Picture of Ya Liu." class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" style="margin:5px" />The graphene-enhanced heat pipes are made of high thermal conductivity graphene assembled films assisted with carbon fibre wicker enhanced inner surfaces. The researchers tested pipes of 6mm outer diameter and 150mm length. They show great advantages and potential in cooling of a variety of electronics and power systems, especially where low weight and high corrosion resistance are required. </div> <div>&quot;The cold part of the graphene enhance heat pipe can be substituted by a heat sink or a fan to make the cooling even more efficient when applied in a real case,&quot; explains Ya Liu <em>(picture to the right)</em>, PhD Student at the Electronics Materials and Systems Laboratory at Chalmers. </div> <div> </div> <div>The new study is based on a collaboration between researchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Fudan University, Shanghai University, China, SHT Smart High-Tech AB, Sweden and Marche Polytechnic University, Italy. <br /></div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">For further information &gt;&gt;&gt;</h3> <div>Ya Liu, PhD Student, Electronics Materials and Systems Laboratory (EMSL), Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience – MC2, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden, yaliu@chalmers.se </div> <div> </div> <div>Johan Liu, Professor, Electronics Materials and Systems Laboratory (EMSL), Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience – MC2, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden, johan.liu@chalmers.se </div> <div> </div> <div>Illustration: Ya Liu and Johan Liu</div> <div>Photo of Johan Liu: Michael Nystås</div> <div>Photo of Ya Liu: Bo Hu</div> <div><br /></div> <div> </div> <div><strong>Read the full paper in Nano Select &gt;&gt;&gt;</strong></div> <div><a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/nano.202000195"><span>http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/nano.202000195<span style="display:inline-block"></span></span></a></div>Thu, 03 Dec 2020 08:00:00 +0100