Materials for tomorrow 2021
The topic of the 2021 Materials for Tomorrow is "Additive Manufacturing – From academic challenges to industrial practice".​​​

Materials for Tomorrow 2021

INVITATION:  The topic of the 2021 Materials for Tomorrow is "Additive Manufacturing – From academic challenges to industrial practice".
The event will take place online, 17 November, 09:30-17:00, with several internationally recognised speakers. This years seminar is devoted to the broad diversity of additive manufacturing, across materials and applications.
The lectures cover the additive manufacturing of metals that are printed by laser or electron beam (e.g. for implants and aircraft components), the printing of tissue from bio inks, as well as the printing of thermoplastic polymers.

The Initiative Seminar will be fully online and free of charge.
Register to the seminar

Program:
09:30 Welcome. Moderators Uta Klement. and Leif Asp, Materials Science  Area of Advance, Chalmers University of Technology.

Session 1
  • Powder Based Metal Additive Manufacturing: possibilities and challenges
    Eduard HryhaProfessor Eduard Hryha, division of Materials and manufacturing, Industrial and materials science, Chalmers Director of CAM2: Centre for Additive Manufacture - Metal.

    Abstract:
    Significant development in the area of powder based metal additive manufacturing during last decade resulted in significant expansion of the material portfolio, development of robust  Additative Manufacturing, AM , processes for number of materials and hence resulting in successful industrial application of the technology for the high-value components. Expansion of portfolio of AM materials as well as understanding the properties of AM materials is the must to assure broader industrial implementation of the technology. Hence, state-of-the-art and challenges of the powder-based metal AM, required to pave the way for the broader industrial utilization of metal AM, are discussed. 
     
  • Industrialization of AM at Alfa Laval
    Anna WenemarkAnna Wenemark, Technology Office Manager, Alfa Laval, and Chairman of the board of CAM2.

    This talk will share Alfa Laval’s journey of industrialization of AM and critical success factors going forward.


  • Operando synchrotron characterization of temperature and phase evolution during laser powder bed fusion of Ti6Al4V
    Helena Van Swygenhoven-MoensProfessor Helena Van Swygenhoven-Moens, Paul Scherrer Institute & École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne Switzerland

    Abstract:
    Thanks to the high brilliance and the fast detectors available at synchrotrons, operando diffraction experiments during L-PBF have become possible.
    Two types of operando experiments are presented. The first is performed while printing a 3D Ti6Al4V during xray diffraction. It allows to track with a time resolution of 50µs the dynamics of the α and β phases during fast heating and solidification, providing the cooling rates of each phase and the duration the β phase exists [Hocine et al, Mat Today 34(2020)30; Add Manuf 34(2020)101194 ; Add Manuf 37 (2021)101747]. The second is an operando experiment carried out on a thin Ti6AlV wall while remelting the surface. It allows quantification of the thermal cycles experienced by the material along the building direction [Ming et al, submitted]. Both experiments were carried out at the MicroXAS beamline of the Swiss synchrotron.
Break 10 minutes

  • The unique material capabilities of Electron Beam Melting (EBM)
    Joakim ÅhlgårdJoakim Ålgårdh, External Research Lead, GE Additive|EBM.
    AbstractWith the use of a high intensity electron beam as an energy source, the additive manufacturing technology Electron Beam Melting (EBM, or EB-PBF) features unique capabilities on materials processability. This talk will give an overview of the features and technologies present in the EBM process; a deep dive in what makes them exceptional, and how they affect and improve the processing and manufacturing of advanced materials. Examples of current materials and their applications will be presented to give an insight to where the technology is used today and why these materials and applications exist. Further, the material possibilities in the EBM process will be discovered to show the unique material capabilities in the process. 

  • Additive manufacturing and metal-based implants
    Anders PalmquistAnders PalmquistDepartment of Biomaterials, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Abstract: Additive manufacturing is becoming an established fabrication technique within the field of biomaterials, where patient specific implants with integrated porous structures could be built to fit the patient in various clinical applications. Powder based techniques such as SLM and EBM are techniques for fabrication of metal implant for bone anchorage and repair, where preclinical studies show a high potential of as-produced implants. The healing potential could be boosted further in combination with bioactive ceramic coatings. Recent and on-going studies will be presented, ranging from material to clinical applications.

Lunch 12:10-13:30

Session 2

  • Materials of Yesterday and LSAM
    Jan Johansson RISEJan Johansson, Researcher at RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Division: Additive Manufacturing
    Abstract: The recent shortages of plastic materials as well as electronic components have made it difficult for the manufacturing industry to meet the demand. During the pandemic, many companies have temporarily or permanently switched to new kinds of products either by choice or necessity. As additive manufacturing can be a good help to accommodate demands of new products so can repurposing industrial robots be a fast and cost-effective way to create the necessary 3D printers for large scale additive manufacturing. By using locally available recycled materials, a long and sometimes brittle supply chain can be shortened and become more resilient and sustainable. Depending on the purpose recycled plastics can be upgraded by wood or other bio based fibres to suit an application. The 3D printing process can in turn be adjusted to handle variations in the recycled raw material.

  • Ugo LafontPolymer additive manufacturing for space: from ground to out-of-earth applications
    Ugo Lafont, Space Materials & Technology Specialist at European Space Agency – ESA
    Abstract: Additive manufacturing using thermoplastics present great advantage for the Space sector. From prototyping to flight hardware manufacturing and looking into the the future toward out-of earth manufacturing, this talk aim to expose the different aspect of polymer 3D printing (FFF/FDM) for space application. The European Space Agency is looking into the implementation and use of new materials to enable new applications for space. Polymers and polymer composites specially are part of such focus among others. However, the benefit of new functionalities or capabilities brought by materials shall be assessed against their behaviour under the effect of space environment. Effect of space environment (VUV, Thermal Cycling, ATOX) on the functional performance of advanced thermoplastics materials (PolyEtherEtherKetone-PEEK) focusing on electrically conductive PEEK processed by additive manufacturing will be presented. The results obtained on this material mechanical, optical and electrical performances be presented including demonstrator enable by such material and process combination. The effect of the process and its relation with the material on the final part performance will be discussed as well showing the importance of having a standardised approach to enable accurate part qualification. The recent advances on the use of 4D printing concepts suitable for space application will be exposed and discussed with an emphasis on the role of meso-structuration. Last, the results presented and the role of materials in the implementation and development of out-of-earth / In-space manufacturing capabilities will be put in perspective against the current state-of-the-art and available technologies. 

  • 3D Bioprinted Human Tissue Models for Pharmaceutical and Cosmetic Product Testing
    Itedale Namro RedwanItedale Namro Redwan, PhD. Chief Scientific Officer, Cellink
    Abstract: Founded in 2016, Cellink is the leading bioprinting company providing technologies, products and services to create, understand and master biology. 
    With a focus on the application areas of bioprinting, the company develops and markets innovative technologies to life science researchers, enabling them to culture cells in 3D, perform high-throughput drug screening and print human tissue and organ models for the medical, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. 
    Cellink’s bioinks are groundbreaking biomaterial solutions that enable researchers to culture human cells into functional tissue constructs. These bioinks provide an environment similar to native human tissue that cells can thrive in due to adhesion contacts, as well as the ability to be manipulated and remodeled, and direct differentiation and organization. Today, the company’s disruptive bioprinting platforms are used to print tissue structures such as liver, heart, skin and even functional cancer tumor models. During the presentation, some of the latest results obtained using the company’s different bioinks and bioprinters will be summarized.


Coffee break 10 minutes

  • AM from a pharmaceutical technology perspective
    Annette LarssonAnnette LarssonProfessor; Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Pharmaceutical Technology, Co-director for Area of Advance Production. 
     
    Abstract: AM technique used for printing pharmaceutical formulations opens up new areas for the future pharmaceutics. However, there are some challenges. This presentation will discuss challenges when it comes to feeding, deposition and adhesion of pharmaceutical formulations, and also come with suggestion on needed next steps of development. To overcome these challenges is a must if the AM technique should be able to provide us with functional pharmaceutics for the future.


  • ​Direct ink writing of thermosetting polymers and composites enabled by frontal polymerization
    Nancy R SottosNancy R Sottos , Professor at the University Of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Materials Science & Engineering, Swanlund Endowed Chair and Center for​ Advanced Study.
    Abstract: Thermosetting polymers and composites present significant challenges for additive manufacturing due to the required speeds of printing in comparison to the time required for the curing reaction, relaxation of the printed ink, interfacial bonding of the printed layers, and integration of high aspect ratio fibers, among many other factors.  Our group recently developed a technique which combines direct ink writing with frontal polymerization (FP) of the thermosetting resin.  Frontal polymerization is a curing process in which a thermal stimulus initiates a self-propagating reaction wave.  Our printing approach is based on the frontal ring-opening metathesis polymerization of endo-dicyclopentadiene (DCPD) and other comonomers using a thermally activated ruthenium catalyst. The monomeric ink is extruded from a print head onto a heated bed triggering the frontal polymerization (FP) reaction. Heat released from the polymerization activates adjacent monomer to further the curing process, thereby forming a self-sustaining propagating reaction wave that polymerizes the printed filament. The stiff polymerized segment of the filament can structurally support the printed part during its fabrication to produce three-dimensional (3D) free form printed structures with excellent fidelity. Fabricated parts exhibit a degree of cure of 99.2% and do not require further post-processing.  The addition of nanoparticles and other reinforcement phases allows access to a range of rheological profiles between low-viscosity liquid and free-standing elastomeric gel – all of which frontally polymerize upon thermal activation. This presentation will summarize the characterization of ink rheology for printing, influence of printing parameters, addition of reinforcing fillers, and the resulting mechanical properties of the printed structures.

About Materials for Tomorrow

Materials for Tomorrow is an annual conference - started in 2010 - covering research, education and innovation in materials science. It is one of Chalmers' Initiative Seminars, and is a crucial meeting place for people representing research, innovation and society. ​

Materials for Tomorrow 2020

Materials for Tomorrow 2019

Materials for Tomorrow 2018

Materials for Tomorrow 2017

Materials for Tomorrow 2016

Materials for Tomorrow 2015

Materials for Tomorrow 2014



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Category Seminar
Location: Online
Starts: 17 November, 2021, 09:30
Ends: 17 November, 2021, 17:00

Page manager Published: Mon 11 Oct 2021.