News: Globalhttp://www.chalmers.se/sv/nyheterNews related to Chalmers University of TechnologySat, 23 Oct 2021 04:40:11 +0200http://www.chalmers.se/sv/nyheterhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/Festive-when-the-graduation-ceremony-was-held-on-campus-again.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/Festive-when-the-graduation-ceremony-was-held-on-campus-again.aspxFestive when the graduation ceremony was held on campus again<p><b>​Perhaps the long pandemic period made this year's graduation ceremony – which took place on campus in RunAn  –  extra solemn.​ </b></p>​​<span style="background-color:initial">The comperes Selma Allerbo and Philip Wramsby were able to welcome 127 graduates to Kårhuset on 16 October.</span><div><br /><span style="background-color:initial"></span><div>The ceremony began with speeches by Chalmers President and CEO Stefan Bengtsson. </div> <div>&quot;We are of course extremely happy to celebrate together with you here at Chalmers,&quot; he began.</div> <div>&quot;Those of you who are now graduating from Chalmers have knowledge that gives you opportunities to contribute to a sustainable future. Chalmers stands up for fact-based decisions, critical thinking and scientific method. I hope your years at Chalmers have given you a good basis to stand on to be able to protect these important values in the future and thus protect an open and democratic society”. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>Stefan Bengtsson concluded by congratulating and wishing everyone good luck on their continued journey, and welcome back to Chalmers in whatever form it is.</div> <div>“Don't forget: You continue to be chalmerists even after your studies. You're the future”.</div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">&quot;Part of our family&quot;</h2> <div>Subsequently, the diploma ceremony was awarded under the leadership of Chalmers Vice President for Education and Lifelong Learning, Anna Karlsson Bengtsson. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>Catrin Lindberg, president of the Student Union, then addressed the examiners.</div> <div>&quot;When you talk to future students, show your diplomas and tell them that they will not only be good problem solvers, but also part of our family and find friends for life”. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>Finally, the examiners were given words along the way by alumni Ulrika Lindstrand, Paul Welander, Therese Eriksson, and finally Robert Falck who urged the students:</div> <div>“Let the future happen!”</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Text: </strong>Erik Krång</div> <div><strong>Photo:</strong> Daniel Ahlqvist</div> <div>​<br /></div> </div>Thu, 21 Oct 2021 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/bio/news/Pages/New-discovery-can-improve-industrial-yeast-strains.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/bio/news/Pages/New-discovery-can-improve-industrial-yeast-strains.aspxNew discovery can improve industrial yeast strains<p><b>​Baker’s yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is used industrially to produce a great variety of biochemicals. These biochemicals can be produced from waste material from the agricultural or forest industry (second-generation biomass). During the mechanical and enzymatic degradation of biomass acetic acid is released. Acetic acid inhibits the growth and the biochemical production rate of yeast. Now, researchers at Chalmers have used high-resolution CRISPRi library screening to provide a new understanding of the stress response of yeast, and they found new target genes for the bioengineering of efficient industrial yeast. ​</b></p><p class="chalmersElement-P">​<span>“We are presenting a massive dataset that offers an extraordinary resolution of the functional contribution of essential genes in baker’s yeast under acetic acid stress. This was never attempted before,” says Vaskar Mukherjee, researcher at the Division of Industrial Biotechnology at Chalmers, first author of the <a href="https://doi.org/10.1128/msystems.00418-21">study​</a>. </span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P">Yvonne Nygård is Associate Professor at Chalmers and last author of the study:</p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P">“In the strain library we screened, the expression of all essential genes was altered, something which was very difficult to do before the discovery of the CRISPR-Cas9-technology,” she adds.</p> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">Reduced expression of essential genes using CRISPRi</h2> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P">CRISPR interference (CRISPRi) is a powerful tool to study cellular physiology under different growth conditions. With this derivative of the Nobel prize winning CRISPR-Cas9-technology genes are not inserted or deleted, but the regulation of the target gene can be altered. Using CRISPRi technology, the researchers can reduce the expression of the essential genes (i.e., genes that on deletion kills the organism), and thus, reduce the level of the protein encoded by the target gene.  </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P">“For most of the essential genes, this keeps the organism viable, and we also get to see the functional contribution of that gene at different expression levels under different nutrient or environmental conditions, in this case under acetic acid stress,” says Vaskar Mukherjee.</p> <div><h2 class="chalmersElement-H2"><span>Proteosomal genes involved in  acidic acid tolerance  ​</span></h2></div> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P">In the study a CRISPRi library consisting of more than 9,000 yeast strains was used and over 98 per cent of all essential and respiratory growth-essential genes were targeted. The results showed that fine-tuning of the expression of proteasomal genes lead to increased tolerance to acetic acid. The proteosome is protein complexes which degrade redundant or damaged proteins by spending ATP, i.e. an organic compound that provides energy to drive many processes in living cells and particular essential in large amount in yeast cells to cope with acetic acid stress. </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P">The authors proposed that adaptation of proteasomal degradation of oxidized proteins saves ATP and thereby increases acetic acid tolerance. The results are of wide interest, suggesting these genes can be targeted for bioengineering of improved industrial cells. </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P">“Our results allowed us to build rational mechanistic models that expand our current understanding of molecular biology of yeast under acetic acid stress. I am sure our footsteps will be followed by many researchers to screen essential genes under many other different conditions. I believe our dataset will be used by academia or industries to identify novel genetic candidates to bioengineer robust acetic acid tolerant yeast strains,” says Vaskar Mukherjee.”</p> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">More research on yeast and second-generation biomass</h2> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P">Currently, the Chalmers’ researchers are working on three different projects where they use similar technologies, among them a project where CRISPRi technology is used to identify novel bioengineering genetic candidates to improve co-utilisation of glucose and xylose during biochemical fermentation using second-generation biomass. </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P">Wild<em> S. cerevisiae</em> cannot metabolize xylose and a xylose utilizing engineered strain of<em> S. cerevisiae</em> prefers glucose over xylose as the primary carbon source. As a result, consumption of xylose is often incomplete in industrial second-generation biochemical fermentation and remains as one of the major bottlenecks for the commercial production of second-generation biochemicals. </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><br /></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><strong>Read the study in mSystems:</strong> <a href="https://doi.org/10.1128/msystems.00418-21">A CRISPR Interference Screen of Essential Genes Reveals that Proteasome Regulation Dictates Acetic Acid Tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae</a></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><strong>Text</strong>: Susanne Nilsson Lindh<br /><span style="background-color:initial"><strong>Photo: </strong>Martina Butorac</span><span style="background-color:initial;color:rgb(0, 0, 0)">​</span></p> <div> </div>Mon, 18 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/chem/news/Pages/Molecular mixing creates super stable glass.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/chem/news/Pages/Molecular%20mixing%20creates%20super%20stable%20glass.aspxMolecular mixing creates super stable glass<p><b>Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have succeeded in creating a new type of super-stable, durable glass with potential applications ranging from medicines, advanced digital screens, and solar cell technology. The study shows how mixing multiple molecules – up to eight at a time – can result in a material that performs as well as the best currently known glass formers. </b></p>​<span style="background-color:initial">A glass, also known as an ‘amorphous solid’, is a material that does not have a long-range ordered structure – it does not form a crystal. Crystalline materials on the other hand, are those with a highly ordered and repeating pattern. The fact that a glass does not contain crystals is what makes it useful.</span><div><br /></div> <div>The materials that we commonly call ‘glass’ in everyday life are mostly silicon dioxide-based, but glass can be formed from many different materials. </div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/KB/Generell/Nyheter/Cellulosatråd/portratt_christian_muller_320x305px.jpg" alt="Porträttbild Christian Müller " class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" style="margin:5px" /><span style="background-color:initial">Rese</span><span style="background-color:initial">archers are therefore always interested in finding new ways to encourage different materials to form this amorphous state, which can potentially lead to the development of new types of glass with improved properties and new applications. The new study,<a href="https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/sciadv.abi4659" title="Link to scientific article "> recently published in the scientific journal Science Advances</a>, represents an important step forward in that search.  </span><div><br /></div> <div>“Now, we have suddenly opened up the potential to create new and better glassy materials, by simply mixing many different molecules. Those working with organic molecules know that using mixtures of two or three different molecules can help to form a glass, but few might have expected that the addition of more molecules, and this many, would achieve such superior results,&quot; says Professor Christian Müller at the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering at Chalmers University who led the research team behind the study.    </div> <div><h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">Best result for any glass forming material​</h2></div> <div>A glass is formed when a liquid is cooled down without undergoing crystallisation, a process called vitrification. The use of mixtures of two or three molecules to encourage glass formation is a well-established concept. However, the impact of mixing a multitude of molecules on the ability to form a glass has received little attention. <br /></div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/KB/Generell/Nyheter/Christian%20Müller%20Molekylmixning%20skapar%20superstabilt%20glas/Sandra%20Hultmark%20320x340.jpg" alt="Porträttbild Sandra Hultmark " class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" style="margin:5px" /><br />The researchers experimented with a mixture of up to eight different perylene molecules which, individually, have a high fragility – a property related to how easy it is for a material to form a glass. But mixing many molecules resulted in a substantial decrease in fragility, and a very strong glass former with ultralow fragility was formed. </div> <br /></div> <div>“The fragility of the glass we created in the study is very low, representing the best glass-forming ability that has been measured not only for any organic material but also polymers and inorganic materials such as bulk metallic glasses. The results are even superior to the glass forming ability of ordinary window glass, one of the best glass formers that we know of” says Sandra Hultmark, doctoral student at the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering and lead author of the study​</div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">Extending product life and saving resources</h2> <div>Important applications for more stable organic glasses are display technologies such as OLED screens and renewable energy technologies such as organic solar cells. <br /><br /></div> <div><div>“OLEDs are constructed with glassy layers of light-emitting organic molecules. If these were more stable it may improve the durability of an OLED and ultimately the display,” Sandra Hultmark explains. </div> <div><br />Another application that may benefit from more stable glasses are pharmaceuticals. Amorphous drugs dissolve more quickly, which aids rapid uptake of the active ingredient upon ingestion. Hence, many pharmaceuticals make use of glass-forming drug formations. For pharmaceuticals it is vital that the glassy material does not crystallise over time. The more stable the glassy drug, the longer the shelf life of the medicine. <br /><br /></div> <div>“With more stable glasses or new glass forming materials, we could extend the lifespan of a large number of products, offering savings in terms of both resources and economy,” says Christian Müller.</div></div> <div><br /></div> <div></div> <div><br /></div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">More about the research​</h3> <div><br /></div> <div><div><ul><li>The scientific article <a href="https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/sciadv.abi4659" title="Link to scientific article ">“Vitrification of octonary perylene mixtures with ultralow fragility”</a> has been published in the scientific journal Science Advances and is written by Sandra Hultmark, Alex Cravcenco, Khuschbu Khushwaha, Suman Mallick, Paul Erhardt, Karl Börjesson and Christian Müller. The researchers are active at Chalmers University of Technology and the University of Gothenburg<br /><br /></li> <li>The researchers chose to work with a series of small, conjugated molecules comprising a perylene core with different pendant alkyl groups at one of the bay positions. All eight perylene derivatives readily crystallise when cast from solution and show a fragility of more than 70.  <br /><br /></li> <li>Mixing of eight perylene derivatives resulted in a material that displays a fragility of only 13, which is a record low value for any glass forming material studied to date, including polymers and inorganic materials such as bulk metallic glasses and silicon dioxide.<br /><br /></li> <li>The research project was funded by the Swedish Research Council, the European Research Council, as well as the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation through project: Mastering Morphology for Solution-born Electronics. </li></ul></div></div> <div><br /></div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">For more information, contact:​</h3> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="/en/staff/Pages/Christian-Müller.aspx" title="Länk till profilsiida ">​<span style="background-color:initial">Christian Müller</span></a><span style="background-color:initial">, </span><span style="background-color:initial">Professor at the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering</span></div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="/en/Staff/Pages/Sandra-Hultmark.aspx" title="Länk till profilsida ">Sandra Hultmark</a>, doktorand på institutionen för kemi och kemiteknik, Chalmers</div> <div><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div>Text: Jenny Holmstrand and Johsua Worth <br />Images: Chalmers/Joshua Worth/Yen Stranqvist </div> <div>​<br /></div> ​​​Thu, 14 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/m2/news/Pages/Chalmers-takes-part-in-unique-pilot-test-of-automated-cars-.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/m2/news/Pages/Chalmers-takes-part-in-unique-pilot-test-of-automated-cars-.aspxChalmers part of unique automated driving test<p><b>​How do we make sure that the human is a reliable fallback and can promptly, safely, and efficiently take back the driving task from automated driving? That’s the key question as Chalmers, together with over 30 stakeholders from academia and industry, now present their findings from Europe’s first comprehensive pilot test of automated driving on public roads. The result is believed to help speed up and harmonize the development of automated driving systems in the future. ​</b></p>​<span style="background-color:initial">The European research project <strong>L3Pilot,</strong> led by Volkswagen and co-funded by the European Commission, has run from 2017 to 2021 with stakeholders from the whole value chain: car manufacturers, suppliers, academia, research institutes, infrastructure and governmental agencies, user groups and the insurance sector. The four-year project will now come to its successful end with performing its Final Event in conjunction with the ITS World Congress in Hamburg 2021 on October 11-15. <br /><br /></span><div>Present at the ITS World Congress are Chalmers researchers from Vehicle Safety at the department of Mechanics and Maritime Studies – <strong>Marco Dozza, Linda Pipkorn, Pierluigi Olleja, along with SAFER representative Erik Svanberg </strong>- to show-case their research findings, which once started with the quest to find out how to optimize safety in automated driving: </div> <div><br /><strong>“We all want full automation, </strong>that is, a vehicle that pick us up and takes us places without us having to think<img src="/SiteCollectionImages/20210701-20211231/Marco%20Dozza.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px 10px" /><br />about driving. But tech is not there yet and there will be a transition phase with partial automation. That means humans and vehicles need to help each other and take turns in the driving task. The most relevant scenario is when a vehicle needs help from the human to sort out a critical situation that may lead to a crash. In such case, the research question is “how do we make sure that the human is a reliable fallback and can promptly, safely, and efficiently take back the driving task?” <span style="background-color:initial">In our research, we tackled this question by exposing drivers to critical situations, where they need to take over control, and see how they do it. In this way, we can design vehicles that help the driver to efficiently coming back to the driving task rather than setting unreasonable expectations on human beings,” says Marco Dozza, professor at Vehicle Safety at the department of Mechanics and Maritime Sciences at Chalmers. <br /></span><span style="color:rgb(33, 33, 33);font-family:inherit;font-size:16px;font-weight:600;background-color:initial"><br />Europe’s first comprehensive pilot test on public roads </span><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div>The project is the first comprehensive pilot test of automated driving on public roads in Europe, which makes it unique in its kind. Fourteen partners focused on testing automated driving functions in normal motorway driving, traffic jams, urban driving and parking. The pilots, running from April 2019 until February 2021, involved six countries besides Sweden: Belgium, Germany, France, Italy, Luxemburg and the United Kingdom and included two cross-border activities between Germany and Luxemburg as well as Germany, Belgium and the United Kingdom. <br /><br /></div> <div><strong>The project equipped 70 vehicles</strong> and the test fleet comprised 13 different vehicle brands, from a passenger car to a SUV. More than 400,000 kilometers were driven on motorways including 200,000 kilometers in an automated mode and 200,000 km in a manual mode as a baseline for comparison of the user experience and evaluation of the impacts. More than 24,000 km were travelled in the automated mode in urban traffic. With the aim to put the focus on the user experience of automated driving functions, over 1,000 persons participated in piloting and complementary virtual environment tests. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>“We’re proud about the high number of advanced studies, with a real vehicle on test track and public roads, that we managed to perform within this project, especially given the pandemic. All of these studies advanced our understanding of how drivers behave - how they act and where they look - when transitioning from automated driving to manual in response to take-over requests,” says Linda Pipkorn, PhD student at Vehicle Safety at the department of Mechanics and Maritime Studies at Chalmers. </div> <div><h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">Unique data collection to enhance safety in automated driving</h3></div> <div>One of the major achievements of L3Pilot is establishing a Code of Practice for the development of Automated Driving Functions (CoP-ADF). It provides comprehensive guidelines for supporting the design, development, verification and validation of automated driving technologies.<br /> </div> <div>The four-year project has also involved a considerable collection of valuable data based on the research findings on how pilot participants reacted when going from automated to manual driving in real traffic scenarios. The data will in the next step enable virtual testing to further enhance safety in automated driving. </div> <div><br /><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/20210701-20211231/lindapipkorn.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="" style="margin:5px 10px" /><strong>“We found out that, in real traffic,</strong> drivers are able to transition control from automation to manual in response to a take-over request. The transition should be considered as a process of actions - look to instrument cluster, putting hands on wheel, look forward, deactivate automation - that requires a certain amount of time: up to 10 s in real traffic. Our research also showed that, in real traffic, drivers’ visual attention towards the forward road return to similar levels as in manual driving 15 s after a take-over request. In response to take-over requests, drivers may look away from the road towards the instrument cluster rather than to the road. This means that, designing safe automated driving functions requires take-over requests to be issued in all situations that require driver input. In addition, it is important for the automated driving function to be responsible for safe driving at least up to the moment of the automation deactivation but preferably also some time after,” says Linda Pipkorn.  <br /><br /></div> <div>As a part of the L3 pilot project, PhD student Linda Pipkorn carried out a study on a public road in Gothenburg (E6) together with Volvo Cars, in Gothenburg (E6) aiming to find out how the drivers’ gaze behavior changed when going from driving with automation to driving manually again. </div> <div><br />“It turned out that, paradoxically, a take-over request, i.e., the signal from the car that the driver needs to take control can contribute to the drivers looking away from the road rather than looking at the road, which from a traffic safety point of view is not optimal,” Linda explains. </div> <div><br />Her work received <strong>the Honda Outstanding Student Paper Award</strong> <strong>at the 2021 Driving Assessment Conference</strong>, an achievement that Linda herself believes can be explained by the project’s unique design: <br /><br /></div> <div>“I believe that an important factor is that our results are based on data collected on public roads, with a real car and a realistic human-machine interface, which is relatively rare in our research area as tests in a simulated environment are more common. Data collected in a realistic environment is important to be able to draw conclusions that are in line with how the systems will be used in real scenarios in the future,” says Linda Pipkorn. </div> <div><br /><strong>L3Pilot is now believed to pave the way</strong> for scaled-up driving tests with automated series vehicles in real-life traffic. Together with 40 partners – OEM:s, automotive suppliers, research institutes, traffic engineering and deployment companies – Chalmers researchers have already started working on the project <a href="https://www.hi-drive.eu/">Hi-Drive</a> with the main objective to extend the data collection across EU borders in variable traffic, weather and visibility conditions. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>Text: Lovisa Håkansson<br /><br /></div> <div><strong>L3Pilot facts:  </strong></div> <div>L3Pilot is an Innovation Action, co-funded by the European Union under the Horizon 2020 programme with the contract number 723051.<br /></div> <div>34 organizations have committed to scientifically test and assess the impact of automated driving systems on driver comfort, safety and traffic efficiency as part of the project.<br /><br /></div> <div>www.l3pilot.eu </div> <div><strong>Twitter:</strong> _L3Pilot_</div> <div><strong>LinkedIn:</strong> L3Pilot </div> <div><strong>Duration: </strong>50 months, 1 September 2017 – 31 October 2021 </div> <div><strong>Total cost:</strong> €68 million</div> <div><strong>EC contribution:</strong> €36 million </div> <div><strong>Coordinator:</strong> Volkswagen AG</div> <div><strong>Partners: </strong></div> <div><strong>Automotive manufacturers:</strong> Volkswagen AG, AUDI AG, BMW Group, Stellantis | Centro Ricerche Fiat SCPA, Ford, Honda R&amp;D Europe, Jaguar Land Rover, Mercedes-Benz AG, Adam Opel AG, Stellantis, Renault, Toyota Motor Europe, Volvo Car Corporation </div> <div><strong>Suppliers:</strong> Aptiv, FEV GmbH, Veoneer Sweden </div> <div><strong>Research:</strong> German Aerospace Center DLR; ika RWTH Aachen University; VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland; Chalmers University of Technology; SNF – Centre for Applied Research at NHH; University of Leeds; Institute of Communication and Computer Systems ICCS; Würzburg Institute for Traffic Sciences WIVW; University of Genoa; TNO – Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research; WMG, University of Warwick; European Center for Information and Communication Technologies – EICT GmbH </div> <div><strong>Authorities:</strong> Federal Highway Research Institute BASt; The Netherlands Vehicle Authority RDW User </div> <div><strong>Groups:</strong> Federation Internationale de l’Automobile FIA Insurers: AZT Automotive GmbH, Swiss Reinsurance Company SMEs: ADAS Management Consulting</div>Thu, 14 Oct 2021 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/bio/news/Pages/Rye-a-better-choice-than-wheat-for-weight-loss.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/bio/news/Pages/Rye-a-better-choice-than-wheat-for-weight-loss.aspxRye a better choice than wheat for weight loss<p><b>​Eating whole grain rye products instead of refined wheat alternatives can offer worthwhile health benefits. Researchers at Chalmers​ recently published a study showing that people who ate high-fibre products made from whole grain rye lost more body fat and overall weight than those who ate corresponding products made from refined wheat. </b></p><p class="chalmersElement-P"><a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clnesp.2021.07.007">​T<span>he new results</span>​</a><span> have been published in the scientific journal Clinical Nutrition. It is the largest study yet designed to evaluate the effects of particular types of grains on body weight and body fat, as well as the first study to focus specifically on rye.</span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial">The study included 242 overweight men and women between the ages of 30 and 70 who were randomly assigned carefully adjusted daily amounts of refined wheat or whole grain rye products with the same energy value. All participants also received the same general advice on healthy eating from a dietitian. The participants were examined at the start of the study, halfway through, and at twelve weeks, when the study ended.</span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial"><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/Bio/Food/Kia_N_Iversen_foto_martina%20butorac_chalmers_340x400.jpg" alt="Kia Noer Iversen" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" style="margin:10px 5px;width:240px;height:282px" />“The results were clear ¬ the participants </span><span style="background-color:initial">w</span><span style="background-color:initial">ho received rye products lost more weight overall, and their levels of body fat decreased compared to those who received wheat products,” says Kia Nøhr Iversen, researcher at the Division of Food and Nutrition Science at Chalmers, and lead author of the study, which forms part of her recently presented doctoral dissertation. </span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial">Although both the rye and wheat groups lost weight during the study, those who ate rye products lost an average of one kilogram more than those who ate wheat products, with the difference attributable to fat loss.</span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">Opening up for personalized nutrition</h2> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P">Different people can react to the same foods in different ways, depending on, for example, the particular bacteria present in the gut, and the way they break down. At the Division of Food and Nutrition Science at Chalmers, research is underway into how diet can be better adapted to the individual level, providing precision nutritional advice to yield greater health benefits. The new study offers unique data that can be used to further research in this area.</p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial"><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/Bio/Food/LandbergRikard_MB-350.jpg" alt="Rikard Landberg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" style="margin:10px 5px;width:240px;height:209px" />&quot;​</span><span style="background-color:initial">Although we saw an overall difference in weight loss between the rye and the wheat group, there was also very large variation within those groups. Increasing our understanding of why different people respond differently to the same foods can pave the w</span><span style="background-color:initial">ay for more specifically tailored diets based on individual needs. We are currently investigating whether certain specific bacteria in the intestine might be the explanation behind why some people lost more weight than others who were also on the rye diet,” says <strong>Rikard Landberg,</strong> Professor of Food and Nutrition at Chalmers.</span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">Link to appetite not estab​lished </h2> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P">Obesity and excess weight are among the biggest health challenges in the world and require many different measures. One idea is to develop foods that contribute to an increased feeling of fullness and have positive effects on metabolism.</p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial">Previous studies have observed that those who eat rye, which has a very high content of dietary fibre, feel more full than those who eat the corresponding amount of energy in the form of refined wheat. One of the purposes of this study was therefore to investigate this potential link between increased intake of rye and weight loss.</span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial">“But surprisingly, in this study, we actually never observed any difference in appetite. We think this may be simply because the method we used to measure appetite was not go​od enough. We are therefore working on evaluating and developing the method further,” says Kia Nøhr Iversen.</span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial">In order for a food to be marketed with specific health claims, a series of rigorous studies must be carried out to prove the effect. These studies are costly and represent a barrier to obtaining the scientific evidence needed, making it less attractive in turn for food producers to develop and market products that could contribute to reducing excess weight and obesity. </span></p> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2"><span>Simple advice for consumers</span></h2> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial">“A particularly positive aspect of our study is that the rye products we used are easily attainable in normal supermarkets in Scandinavia and most of Europe. Consumers can therefore act on the new results immediately. It does not require particular effort or dedication to have a diet rich in whole grain rye”, says Kia Nøhr Iversen.</span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial">The researchers caution that there is more work needed before they can show in detail exactly what mechanisms determine why whole grain rye is good for weight loss at the individual level. But the results of the new study already demonstrate a causal link between rye intake and weight loss through fat reduction, and studies to determine the mechanisms behind this link are already under way. </span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial">“As we continue to look for the exact reasons why, our advice is to choose the rye bread instead of the sifted wheat bread,” says Kia Nøhr Iversen.</span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><br /></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><strong>More detailed info about the research</strong></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"></p> <ul><li>The scientific article <a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clnesp.2021.07.007">‘A hypocaloric diet rich in high fibre rye foods causes greater reduction in body weight and body fat than a diet rich in refined wheat: A parallel randomized controlled trial in adults with overweight and obesity (the RyeWeight study)’</a> has been published in Clinical Nutrition. It was was written by Kia Nøhr Iversen, Frida Carlsson, Agneta Andersson, Ulf Risérus, Per M. Hellström and Rikard Landberg. The researchers are active at Chalmers and Uppsala University. ​</li> <li>242 males and females classified as overweight or obese, aged 30–70 years, were randomised to consume high fiber rye products or refined wheat products for 12 weeks, while adhering to a hypocaloric diet. They were examined at week 0, week 6 and week 12, with measurements taken including body weight and body composition, collection of blood samples and evaluation of subjective appetite.</li> <li>After 12 weeks the participants in the rye group had lost 1.08 kilo body weight and 0.54 per cent body fat more than the wheat group. There were no consistent group differences on subjective appetite.</li> <li>The main funder of the research project is Formas. Two companies have contributed with products and support for certain analysis.  </li></ul> ​<strong>Text:</strong> Susanne Nilsson Lindh and Mia Halleröd Palmgren<br /><strong>Translation:</strong> Joshua Worth<br /><strong>Photo:</strong> Martina Butorac<p></p> <div> ​</div>Tue, 12 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/researchinfrastructure/oso/news/Pages/SKAO-Chalmers-agreement.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/researchinfrastructure/oso/news/Pages/SKAO-Chalmers-agreement.aspxKey role in the world's largest radio telescope project<p><b>​Chalmers will lead Sweden’s participation in the project to build the world's largest radio telescopes. At a ceremony held in Manchester and Gothenburg on September 30, 2021, a new agreement was signed between Chalmers and the intergovernmental organisation SKA Observatory. The agreement covers the next two years, giving time for Sweden to establish a formal membership in the international organisation.</b></p>​<span style="background-color:initial">The international SKA Observatory (SKAO) was established in early 2021. Its two vast telescopes, located at remote sites in South Africa and Australia, will together become one of this century’s most important scientific facilities. </span><div><br /><span style="background-color:initial"></span><div>“With the new agreement in place, Chalmers has a new, official role as leading Swedish interests in the construction of the SKA Observatory's giant telescopes. Funding for Swedish participation in the construction project is already secured, thanks to support from the Swedish Research Council and Vinnova”, says Lars Börjesson, board member of the SKAO.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>The two SKA telescopes are made up of many individual antennas, each sensitive to invisible radio waves from space. In total, 197 dish antennas will be placed in South Africa, forming a telescope for shorter wavelengths. Over 130 000 smaller antennas will make up the other telescope, located in Australia, sensitive to longer wavelength. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>Both will be able to map radio waves from the cosmos with unprecedented sensitivity. <span style="background-color:initial">The telescopes will investigate the mysteries of dark energy, dark matter, and cosmic magnetism, study how galaxies have</span><span style="background-color:initial"> </span><span style="background-color:initial">evolved</span><span style="background-color:initial">, test Einstein’s theories, and search for clues to the origins of life.</span></div> <div><br /></div> <div>“Scientists in Sweden and all over the world want to use the SKA telescopes to ask some of our biggest questions about the universe. <span style="background-color:initial">Membership in the SKA Observatory makes it possible for Swedish science and technology to be involved in building of these unique telescopes. It also ensures access to scientific data, and the chance to make exciting discoveries in astronomy and physics</span><span style="background-color:initial">”, explains John Conway.</span></div> <div><strong><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Centrum/Onsala%20rymdobservatorium/340x/ska_signing1_bengtsson_72dpi_340x340.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><br />Openings for industry</strong></div> <div><br /></div> <div>The new agreement means that Swedish companies are now eligible to tender for industrial contracts on equal terms as the SKAO’s current member countries. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>“This is a great opportunity for Sweden’s high-tech industries to get involved in a challenging and extremely exciting project”, says John Conway, director of Onsala Space Observatory and professor of radio astronomy at Chalmers.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>When the SKA telescopes are operational, they will generate data in quantities that make what today counts as &quot;big data&quot; look small. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>The new agreement also means a green light for the establishment in Sweden of one of SKAO's regional data processing centres. These centres are designed to handle the flood of data from SKA’s telescopes and supply final data products to astronomers.</div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Centrum/Onsala%20rymdobservatorium/340x/ska_signing3_zoom_72dpi_340x193.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><br /></div> <div><strong>Swedish tech opening new windows on the universe</strong></div> <div><br /></div> <div>The documents signed on 30 September 2021 by Stefan Bengtsson, Chalmers' president, and Philip Diamond, Director General of the SKA Observatory, give Chalmers the responsibility of representing Sweden in the project during the next two years. During that time, national processes will continue towards establishing Sweden as a member country of SKAO.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>“Sweden has been involved in the SKA project since the start. It’s wonderful to welcome Chalmers and Onsala Space Observatory in this new official role, just as building work is starting in South Africa and in Australia”, says Philip Diamond.</div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Centrum/Onsala%20rymdobservatorium/340x/ska_signing2_chalmers_72dpi_340x201.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><br /><span style="background-color:initial">“Before long, the SKA telescopes will begin to show us a whole new universe, giving scientists all over the world new discoveries and new challenges. When that happens, we can be proud of having supplied key Swedish technology to the project, technology with its roots right here at Chalmers and at Onsala Space Observatory”, says Stefan Bengtsson.</span><br /></div> <div> </div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>More about Sweden’s role in the SKA project</strong></div> <div><br /></div> <div>Onsala Space Observatory represented Swedish interests in the SKA design process between 2012 and 2021 as a member of the SKA Organization. </div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Centrum/Onsala%20rymdobservatorium/340x/SKA-Mid_wide_angle_72dpi_340x340.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><br />Chalmers and Swedish companies have made important contributions to the design and prototyping of the SKA telescopes, with the support of Big Science Sweden and working together with colleagues in Canada, France, India, Spain and South Africa.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><ul><li>The telescopes’ physically largest radio receivers, known as Band 1, have been designed and prototyped at Onsala Space Observatory. After a competitive procurement process, they will be manufactured by a Swedish company and a complete set delivered to SKAO's telescope in South Africa. </li> <li><span style="background-color:initial">Innovative low-noise amplifiers for Band 1 and for two other SKA receiver bands will supplied by the Gothenburg company Low Noise Factory, making use of the Chalmers MyFab clean room facility for the fabrication of core components.</span><br /></li> <li><span style="background-color:initial">The digital sampler design for the telescope in South Africa is now being finalised by the Gothenburg company Qamcom Research &amp; Technology AB. T</span>he digital samplers will also be manufactured by a Swedish company after a competitive procurement process.<br /></li></ul></div> <div><br /></div> <div>Swedish involvement in the SKAO is also opening new opportunities in data storage, machine learning and artificial intelligence. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>“At Onsala Space Observatory we’ve already started exploring these opportunities, working together Chalmers Fraunhofer Centre for Industrial Mathematics. That was demonstrated recently by an outstanding Swedish team performance in a recent international data challenge, applying machine learning to simulated SKA data”, says John Conway.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>More about the SKA Observatory and Onsala Space Observatory</strong></div> <div><br /></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">The SKAO, formally known as the SKA Observatory, is a global collaboration of Member States whose mission is to build and operate cutting-edge radio telescopes to transform our understanding of the Universe, and deliver benefits to society through global collaboration and innovation.</span><br /></div> <div><div><br /></div> <div>Headquartered in the UK, its two telescope arrays will be constructed in Australia and South Africa and be the two most advanced radio telescope networks on Earth. A later expansion is envisioned in both countries and other African partner countries. Together with other state-of-the-art research facilities, the SKAO’s telescopes will explore the unknown frontiers of science and deepen our understanding of key processes, including the formation and evolution of galaxies, fundamental physics in extreme environments and the origins of life. Through the development of innovative technologies and its contribution to addressing societal challenges, the SKAO will play its part to address the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals and deliver significant benefits across its membership and beyond.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>The SKAO recognises and acknowledges the Indigenous peoples and cultures that have traditionally lived on the lands on which the SKAO facilities are located.</div></div> <div><br /></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">Onsala Space Observatory is Sweden's national infrastructure for radio astronomy, hosted by the Department of Space, Earth and Environment at Chalmers University of Technology. The observatory provides researchers with equipment for the study of both the distant universe and of our earth. At Onsala, 45 km south of Gothenburg, the observatory operates four radio telescopes and a station in the international telescope Lofar. The SKA project is one of several international projects that the observatory participates in. Onsala Space Observatory receives funding from the Swedish Research Council and from the Swedish National Mapping Agency to support its activities in astronomy and geoscience, respectively.</span><br /></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><strong>Contacts</strong></div> <div><br /></div> <div>Robert Cumming, communicator, Onsala Space Observatory, Chalmers, tel: +46 31-772 5500 or +46 70 493 3114, robert.cumming@chalmers.se.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>John Conway, professor and infrastructure director, Onsala Space Observatory, Chalmers, +46 31-772 5500, john.conway@chalmers.se</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong><em>Images</em></strong></div> <div><strong><em><br /></em></strong></div> <div><em>A (top) - Nighttime composite image of the SKA combining all elements in South Africa and Australia. Credit: SKAO, ICRAR, SARAO / Acknowledgment: The GLEAM view of the centre of the Milky Way, in radio colour. Credit: Natasha Hurley-Walker (Curtin / ICRAR) and the GLEAM Team.</em></div> <div><em>Image credit: SKAO</em></div> <div><em></em></div> <div><em><br /></em></div> <div><div><em>B - At a ceremony on 30 September 2021, Stefan Bengtsson, president of Chalmers (foreground) and </em><em style="background-color:initial">Philip Diamond director general of the SKAO </em><em style="background-color:initial">(right, on screen</em><em style="background-color:initial">) </em><em style="background-color:initial">signed the new agreement between the SKAO and Chalmers. </em></div> <div><em style="background-color:initial">Image credit: Chalmers/R. Cumming</em></div> <div><em> </em></div> <div><div><em>C - The signing ceremony was held at the SKAO headquarters at Jodrell Bank, UK, and at Chalmers, with guests participating digitally. This screenshot shows Stefan Bengtsson and the Chalmers event (upper right) and professor Catherine Cesarsky, chair of the SKAO Board (below).</em></div> <div><em>Image credit: SKAO</em></div> <div><em><br /></em></div> <div><em></em></div></div> <div><em>D - The signing ceremony on 30 September 2021 in Gothenburg was attended by John Conway, director of Onsala Space Observatory, Lars Börjesson, board member of the SKAO, Stefan Bengtsson, president of Chalmers and Eva Wirström, division head for Onsala Space Observatory. </em></div> <div><em>Image credit: Chalmers/R. Cumming</em></div></div> <div><br /></div> <div><div><em>E –  This image shows an artist’s impression of the array of 197 dish antennas in South Africa. Of these 64 antennas (right half of image) are already in place in the form of the MeerKAT telescope. </em></div> <div><em>Image credit: SKAO</em></div></div> <div> </div> <div><br /></div></div> ​Thu, 07 Oct 2021 08:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/ict/news/Pages/Can-automated-fact-checkers-clean-up-the-mess.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/ict/news/Pages/Can-automated-fact-checkers-clean-up-the-mess.aspxCan automated fact checkers clean up the mess?<p><b>​The dream of free dissemination of knowledge seems to be stranded in a swamp of tangled truth. Fake news proliferates. Digital echo chambers confirm biases. Even basic facts seem hard to be agreed upon. Is there hope in the battle to clean up this mess?  </b></p>​Yes! Within the research area of information and communications technology (ICT) a lot of effort is made to find software solutions. As part of the<span style="background-color:initial"> Act Sustainable week, starting 15th of November, t</span><span style="background-color:initial">h</span><span style="background-color:initial">e ICT Area of Advance </span><span style="background-color:initial">invites you to a morning session with focus on automated fact-checking.​ </span><div><br /><span style="background-color:initial"></span><div><div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">AGENDA 18 November</h3> <div><div></div> <div><div><b>09:45 Introduction </b></div> <div><b>Erik Ström</b>, Director, Information and Communications Technology Area of Advance</div> <div><b>10:00 Looking for the truth in the post-truth era</b></div> <div><b>Ivan Koychev,</b> University of Sofia, Bulgaria. He will give a brief overview of how to automatically find the claims and facts in the text and how further to look for their confirmation or refutation.</div> <div><b>10:30 Computational Fact Checking for Textual Claims</b></div> <div><b>Paolo Papotti,</b> Associate Professor, EURECOM, France. He will cover the opportunities and limitations of computational fact checking and its role in fighting misinformation. He will also give examples from the &quot;infodemic&quot; associated with the COVID-19 pandemic.</div> <div><b>11:00 Pause</b></div> <div><b>11:10 Panel discussion</b></div> <div>Moderator <b>Graham Kemp</b>, professor, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Chalmers together with an invited panel.​ More info to come!</div> <div><b>12:00 The end​</b></div></div> <div><b><br /></b></div> <div></div></div> <div>Welcome to learn more about how to sort out some of the tangle!​</div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="https://www.actsustainable.se/thursday21" target="_blank" title="link to the Act Sustainable website"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Read more and register here</a></div> <div><a href="https://www.actsustainable.se/thursday21" target="_blank" title="link to the Act Sustainable website"></a><a href="https://www.actsustainable.se/" target="_blank" title="Link to start page Act Sustainable website"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Read more about the Act Sustainable week​</a>​<br /></div></div></div> <div><br /></div></div>Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/bio/news/Pages/Hasselblad-Foundation-awards-nanomedicine-research-.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/bio/news/Pages/Hasselblad-Foundation-awards-nanomedicine-research-.aspxHasselblad Foundation awards nanomedicine research <p><b>​Alexandra Stubelius, Assistant Professor in chemical biology at Chalmers, is awarded the Hasselblad Foundation grant to female researchers for her research on immunomodulating nano-therapeutics.“I am honoured to be awarded this grant. It is of great importance to find new solutions to medical issues that affect so many people, and this award helps me to continue with my research,&quot; says Alexandra Stubelius.</b></p><p class="chalmersElement-P">​<span>The Hasselblad Foundation annually awards two female researchers at Chalmers and the University of Gothenburg, GU, a grant of 1 million SEK each. This year’s grant is awarded Alexandra Stubelius at the Department of Biology and Biological Engineering at Chalmers and Carolina Guibentif, GU, whose research focus is on mammalian developmental hematopoiesis and leukemia, using single-cell profiling.</span></p> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2"><span>Develops nanomedicines​</span></h2> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial">Alexandra Stubelius</span><span style="background-color:initial">' research is about developing so-called nanomedicines to better treat diseases such as arthritis, atherosclerosis, and fatty liver, which all get worse from inflammation and which affect millions of people around the world. </span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial">“The immune system is complex and ​controls many important functions in the body. New nanomaterials allow us to affect many functions simultaneously in a smarter way than today's more blunt systems. The immune system is really smart but sometimes needs some extra help,” says Alexandra Stubelius.</span></p> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2"><span>Intelligent therapies ​</span></h2> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial">An overactive immune system can attack the body’s own tissues, causing both allergies and chronic diseases. The most common anti-inflammatory drugs used today inhibit all immune functions – even the good defence mechanism and need to be used at high doses. These high doses result in side effects on other organs.</span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial">“In order to use the immune system optimally, more intelligent therapies, that can direct the drugs to the right area, at the right concentration, and at the right time, are needed,” says Alexandra Stubelius. </span></p> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2"><span>Three different strategies​</span></h2> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial">Alexandra Stubelius explains that her team uses three different strategies to develop smarter nanomedicines.</span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial">First, they develop new materials, nanovesicles, that can carry existing anti-inflammatory drugs. The materials are designed to target the inflammation and deliver the drugs without damaging the surrounding tissue. </span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial">The second strategy is to create nanomaterials that can modulate the immune system. The nanomaterial acts as active substance that affects the immune response.  </span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial">“With this method, we can fight inflammation in a new way. We aim to interfere with the communication signals of immune cells already in the blood stream. This inhibits more immune cells to be recruited to the affected tissue and prevents the inflammation from getting worse.”</span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial">The third strategy is based on the discovery that the immune system not only defends out bodies, but also heals damaged tissue. The researchers examine which components that affects the immune cells in the healing process. The identified components can then be used to continue develop smarter materials for more specific immune-regulating therapies.</span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial">“The grant I have been awarded by the Hasselblad Foundation will mainly go towards hiring a postdoc that can help me achieve my goal of smarter immunotherapies,&quot; says Alexandra Stubelius.</span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial"><strong>Text: </strong>Susanne Nilsson Lindh<br /></span><span style="background-color:initial"><strong>Photo:</strong> Hasselblad Foundation </span><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial"><strong>More about: </strong></span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"></p> <ul><li><span style="background-color:initial"><a href="/en/departments/bio/research/chemical_biology/Stubelius-lab/Pages/default.aspx">Alexandra Stubelius research</a><br /></span></li> <li><span style="background-color:initial"><a href="https://www.hasselbladfoundation.org/wp/naturvetenskaplig-projekt/female-scientists/?lang=en"><span>The Hasselblad Foundation grant for female scientis</span>ts</a><br /></span></li></ul> <p></p> <div> </div> <div>​<br /></div> <div> </div>Thu, 30 Sep 2021 08:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/Daniel-Gillblad-new-Director-of-Chalmers-AI-Research-Center.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/Daniel-Gillblad-new-Director-of-Chalmers-AI-Research-Center.aspxChalmers AI Research Center gets a new director<p><b>​On 1 October, Daniel Gillblad will begin his role as the new Director of Chalmers AI Research Center (CHAIR). He will take on the responsibility of leading the continued development of Chalmers’ cutting-edge capabilities within artificial intelligence, with the goal of driving world-leading research for the benefit of Swedish industry and the public sector. ​</b></p>​<span></span><span style="background-color:initial">Daniel Gillblad currently works as Co-Director Scientific Vision at Sweden’s national AI centre, AI Sweden. He has previously worked as a researcher, research leader and laboratory head at the Swedish Institute of Computer Science, SICS, as well as Head of AI research at </span>Research Institutes of Sweden,<span style="background-color:initial"> Rise. </span><div><br /></div> <div>”Daniel’s comprehensive expertise and experience will be a huge advantage for the continued work of integrating Chalmers’ AI research within national and international research initiatives, supporting our educational assignment in AI as well as encouraging innovation and commercialisation and developing our collaborations with industrial partners in AI,” says Stefan Bengtsson, President and CEO of Chalmers University of Technology.  </div> <div>Daniel Gillblad will begin his role as the new Director of CHAIR on </div> <div>1 October, while also continuing his work as Co-Director at Sweden’s national AI center, AI Sweden.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>“I am extremely glad to be given this opportunity as Director of CHAIR to work together with Chalmers researchers to develop future AI methods and applications. I am also greatly looking forward to further strengthening the connections between academia, industry and the public sector through my continued work with AI Sweden,” says Daniel Gillblad. </div> <div><br /></div> <div><em>Text: Ingrid Claesson</em></div> ​Wed, 29 Sep 2021 14:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Microscopic-metavehicles-powered-by-nothing-but-light-.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Microscopic-metavehicles-powered-by-nothing-but-light-.aspxTiny vehicles powered by nothing but light<p><b>​Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have succeeded in creating tiny vehicles powered by nothing but light. By layering an optical metasurface onto a microscopic particle, and then using a light source to control it, they succeeded in moving the tiny vehicles in a variety of complex and precise ways – and even using them to transport other objects.​</b></p><div><span style="background-color:initial">Lig</span><span style="background-color:initial">ht has an inherent power to move microscopic objects – a property previously used to develop the Nobel prize winning research idea of ‘optical tweezers’, which use a highly focused laser beam to control and manoeuvre tiny particles with incredible precision.</span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">N</span><span style="background-color:initial">ow, a research group at Chalmers University of Technology and the University of Gothenburg has shown how even an unfocused light can be used to manoeuvre microscopic particles in a controlled manner. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1038/s41565-021-00941-0">Their research was recently published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology. ​</a> </span><div><div><br /></div> <div>The researchers manufactured vehicles at a scale of 10 micrometres wide and 1 micrometre thick – one thousandth of a millimetre. The vehicles consisted of a tiny particle, coated with something known as a ‘metasurface’. Metasurfaces are ultra-thin arrangements of carefully designed and ordered nanoparticles, tailored to direct light in interesting and unusual ways. They offer fascinating possibilities for use in advanced components for optical applications such as cameras, microscopes and electronic displays. Usually, they tend to be thought of as stationary objects, with their use being seen as the ability to control and affect light. But here, the researchers looked at it the other way around, investigating how the forces resulting from the light’s change in momentum could be used to control the meta-surface. </div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div style="font-size:20px"><span style="background-color:initial">L</span><span style="background-color:initial">ike two pool balls colliding </span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">Th</span><span style="background-color:initial">e researchers took their microscopic vehicles, which they termed ‘metavehicles’, and placed them on the bottom of a water dish, then used a loosely focused laser to direct a plane wave of light onto them. By a purely mechanical process – the heat generated by the light plays no part in the effect – the vehicles could then be moved in a variety of patterns. By adjusting the intensity and polarisation of the light, the researchers succeeding in controlling the vehicles’ movement and speed with a high level of precision, navigating them in different directions and complex patterns, such as figures of eight.</span><span style="background-color:initial"><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/F/Blandade%20dimensioner%20inne%20i%20artikel/Mikael_Käll_180x224_Anna-Lena_Lundquist.jpg" alt="Mikael Käll" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" style="margin:5px" /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">“</span><span style="background-color:initial">According to Newton’s third law, for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction – this means that when the light hits the meta-surface, and is deflected in a new direction, the meta-surface is also pushed away in the other direction. Imagine playing pool, when two balls hit each other and bounce off in different directions. In this case, the photons and the meta surface are like those two pool balls,” explains <strong>Mikael Käll</strong>, Professor at the Department of Physics at Chalmers University of Technology, co-author of the article and leader of the research project.</span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div style="font-size:20px"><span style="background-color:initial">Transporting other small objects</span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/F/Blandade%20dimensioner%20inne%20i%20artikel/Daniel_Andren_%20180x224.jpg" alt="Daniel Andrén" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" style="margin:5px" />“</span><span style="background-color:initial">The metavehicles were stable, and their navigation was highly predictable and controllable. With advanced automated feedback systems, and more sophisticated control of the intensity and polarisation of the source light, even more complex navigation would be possible,” explains <strong>Daniel Andrén</strong>, formerly of the Department of Physics at Chalmers and lead author of the study.  </span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">T</span><span style="background-color:initial">he researchers also experimented with using the metavehicles as transporters, to push small particles around the tank. The metavehicles proved capable of transporting objects including a microscopic pol</span><span style="background-color:initial">ystyrene bead and a yeast particle through the water with ease. They even succeeded in pushing a dust particle 15 times the size of the metavehicle itself.  </span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">A</span><span style="background-color:initial">t the moment, the practical applications of this discovery may be a way off. But the fundamental nature of the research means that its value may not yet be evident.</span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">“In the exploration of optical forces, there are many interesting effects that are not yet fully understood. It is not applications that drive this type of research, but exploration of the different possibilities. In a number of different stages ahead, you never know what will happen. But the fact that we showed how the metavehicles can be used as transporters is the most initially promising potential application, for example to move particles through cell solutions,” explains Mikael Käll.</span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><a href="https://youtu.be/CMkRSquPWk0" target="_blank"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" /></a><span style="background-color:initial"><font color="#1166aa"><b>Click here to watch a video of the metavehicles in action (Youtube)</b></font></span><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div style="font-size:20px"><span style="background-color:initial">M</span><span style="background-color:initial">ore information about the research</span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">T</span><span style="background-color:initial">he research is presented in the article </span><a href="https://doi.org/10.1038/s41565-021-00941-0" target="_blank">Microscopic Metavehicles Powered and Steered by Embedded Optical Metasurfaces</a><span style="background-color:initial"> in the journal Nature Nanotechnology. The article was written by physicists Daniel Andrén, Denis G. Baranov, Steven Jones, Giovanni Volpe, Ruggero Verre and Mikael Käll, active at Chalmers University of Technology, the University of Gothenburg and the Moscow Insitute of Physics and Technology.</span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">T</span><span style="background-color:initial">he project was funded by the Excellence Initiative Nano at Chalmers University of Technology, the Swedish Research Council and the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation. For the project, nanotreatment was carried out at Myfab. The microscopic vehicles were manufactured at Chalmers.</span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div style="font-size:20px"><span style="background-color:initial">For further information, contact: </span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><strong>Daniel Andrén</strong>, former PhD student at the Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology and lead author of the study</span></div> <div><a href="mailto:daniel.andren@chalmers.se">daniel.andren@chalmers.se</a></div> <div>+46 73 516 65 18</div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="/en/Staff/Pages/Mikael-Käll.aspx" target="_blank">Mikael Käll</a><span style="background-color:initial">, Professor at the Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology</span></div> <div><a href="mailto:mikael.kall@chalmers.se">mikael.kall@chalmers.se​​</a></div> <div>+46 31 772 31 19 <br /></div></div></div> <div><br /></div> <div>Text: Lisa Gahnertz and Joshua Worth<br />Photo: Anna-Lena Lundquist (Mikael Käll) and Carolina Harvonen (Daniel Andrén) | ​Illustration: Denis Baranov<br /></div> ​​​Tue, 28 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/ace/news/Pages/InfraVis-will-help-Swedens-researchers-visualise-scientific-data.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/ace/news/Pages/InfraVis-will-help-Swedens-researchers-visualise-scientific-data.aspxInfraVis will help Sweden's researchers visualise scientific data<p><b>The Chalmers-led platform InfraVis has been granted funding from VR, the Swedish Research Council, to build a new national infrastructure for visualization and analysis of scientific data. The new infrastructure will give researchers access to expertise and development of competence in nine Swedish universities and contribute to enhance Sweden’s competitiveness in handling big data.</b></p>​Today, the latest technology in data visualization is available at several universities in Sweden, but for the individual researcher it can be difficult to get started as a user as the technology requires expertise, time and resources. InfraVis will be able to remedy this by creating a common gateway to the advanced technologies in combination with competence-enhancing initiatives for researchers around the country.  <br /><br />InfraVis thus meets a growing need and <a href="/en/Staff/Pages/monica-billger.aspx">Monica Billger</a>, main applicant and Professor of Architecture and Visualization at the Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering at Chalmers, expects users from a wide range of disciplines such as humanities, medicine and technology, already during the first year.   <br /><br />   – Data analysis is an increasingly important part of the researchers' workflow, but also a challenge as it can involve very large and complex amounts of data. Here, visualization can come in as an important tool for activating our ability to recognize patterns and detect trends, says Monica Billger.  <br /><br />In addition to support researchers, InfraVis experts around the country will be strengthened themselves through collaboration. Local resources will also be given the opportunity for further development in a sustainable structure. Anders Ynnerman, Professor of Visualization at Linköping University which is one of the collaborators, states that “the investment in InfraVis confirms Sweden's strong position in visualization research in the world and gathers the country's experts to offer Swedish researchers unique opportunities for advanced visual data analysis. Anders Ynnerman think InfraVis is an example of a new generation of infrastructures that includes both hardware and software, but above all also human expertise.  <br /><br />   – The management of an infrastructure with nine different universities as partners requires good cooperation, which the InfraVis consortium already have established as the decision to fund the national infrastructure has been preceded by careful planning and close cooperation between the host university Chalmers and the other partner universities, states Monica Billger.  <br /><br /><div>The collaborating parties are: Chalmers University of Technology, University of Gothenburg, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Linköping University, Linnaeus University, Lund University, Mid Sweden University, Umeå University and Uppsala University.  </div> <div><br /></div> <div><h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">Quote from the international assessor’s remark  </h3> <div>“<em>The idea of a visualization competence infrastructure is novel, timely and needed. InfraVis combines national strength in this field to propose a new model for making this competence accessible to other fields. It could serve as a blueprint for other IT competence fields in Sweden and for visualization in other countries. This is an excellent project that addresses an important need, especially that this infrastructure is relevant to all sciences and also addresses important societal aspects. It would be unique in the world</em>.”  </div> <div><br /></div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">Contact:</h3> <div>Monica Billger, Professor in Architecture and Visualisation at the Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering at Chalmers University of Technology <br />Ph. +46 317722383<br /><a href="mailto:monica.billger@chalmers.se">monica.billger@chalmers.se  </a>  </div> <div><br /></div> <div><h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">Other contact persons:</h3> <div><a href="/en/departments/ace/news/Documents/Contact%20persons%20from%20partner%20universities.pdf"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/en/departments/ace/news/_layouts/images/icpdf.png" alt="Kontaktpersoner universitet.pdf" />Contact persons from partner universities.pdf</a><br /></div> <div><br /></div></div></div>Tue, 28 Sep 2021 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/bio/news/Pages/Enzyme-researcher-joins-the-Young-Academy-of-Sweden.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/bio/news/Pages/Enzyme-researcher-joins-the-Young-Academy-of-Sweden.aspxEnzyme researcher joins the Young Academy of Sweden<p><b>​Johan Larsbrink, Associate Professor in molecular enzymology at Chalmers, is elected one of eight new members of the Young Academy of Sweden.  </b></p><p class="chalmersElement-P">​<span>&quot;It feels great and I am honored to have been elected. I see it as a possibility to influence the conditions for young researchers in Sweden. It is also a good opportunity to get to know other researchers around the country from completely different research areas,&quot; says Johan Larsbrink. </span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial">The <a href="https://www.sverigesungaakademi.se/en-GB/1.html">Young Academy of Sweden​</a> (YAS) is an independent academy which bring young researchers together and provides a </span><span style="background-color:initial">platform </span><span style="background-color:initial">to influence current and future research policy and create new, and unexpected, interdisciplinary collaborations. YAS also aims to spread knowledge and influence society at large. Among other things, the academy’s work is focused on inspiring and educating children and young people.</span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial">&quot;Like all members of YAS, I will contribute with my own experiences and perspectives. The academy is very dynamic, so there are good opportunities to spark new</span><span style="background-color:initial"> ideas,&quot; says Johan Larsbrink.</span></p> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2"><span>Enzymes that degrade biomass and dietary fiber</span></h2> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial">His research at the Department of Biology and Biological Engineering is about enzymes that various microorganisms use to break down biomass and use it as nutrition. Biomass degradation is an important step in the production of biofuels. Increased understanding of these enzymes can provide more efficient processes and more sustainable fuel production.  </span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial">Johan Larsbrink's research group also study gut bacteria that break down dietary fiber, in order to give a better understanding in how different diets benefit different species in the gut. Some of the enzymes studied could also be used as antimicrobials, by breaking down the protective barriers surrounding harmful microorganisms.</span></p> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2"><span>Look forward to </span>interdisciplinary collaborations</h2> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial">The members of YAS are elected for five years and there are currently 38 members in the academy.</span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P">”We take huge pleasure in welcoming new members, the number of applicants this year was record high. We look forward to unleashing our energy on new activities together,” says chair Sebastian Westenhoff in a press release from YAS.</p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial">&quot;With the number of applicants, it of course feels very special to have been elected. I applied because I have heard of many positive things about YAS. I now look forward to working with committed people at a similar stage in their careers – but from different research fields,&quot; says Johan Larsbrink.</span></p> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2"><span>Focus on researchers' conditions and transparent supervision</span></h2> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P">On his agenda is, among other things, the different conditions for researcher at different universities. For example, the proportion of research grants that can fund the research project and what amount that must cover other costs at the university . </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P">&quot;I also think it is important that we strive for a better and more transparent follow-up of supervision, which is typically a very important part of the doctoral education,&quot; says Johan Larsbrink, who was named <a href="/en/departments/bio/news/Pages/Larsbrink-research-supervisor-of-the-year-2019.aspx">Researcher Supervisor of the Year</a> at Chalmers 2019.</p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><br /></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial"><strong>Read more about Johan Larsbrink's research:</strong></span><br /></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"></p> <ul><li><a href="/en/departments/bio/news/Pages/Biodiversity-in-Vietnam-leads-the-industry-forward.aspx">Biodiversity in Vietnam leads the industry forward​</a><br /></li> <li><a href="/en/departments/bio/news/Pages/Unique-enzymes-help-gut-bacteria-compete-for-food.aspx">Unique enzymes help gut bacteria compete for food</a></li></ul> <p></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><strong style="background-color:initial">Also read: </strong><br /></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"></p> <ul><li><a href="/en/research/our-scientists/Pages/The-Young-Academy-of-Sweden.aspx">Chalmers Scientists in The Young Academy of Sweden​</a></li></ul> <p></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial"><strong>Text:</strong> Susanne Nilsson Lindh<br /></span><span style="background-color:initial"><strong>Photo</strong>: Martina Butorac</span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><br /></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p>Fri, 24 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/materials/news/Pages/Additive-manufacturing-can-fundamentally-change-the-way-we-live.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/materials/news/Pages/Additive-manufacturing-can-fundamentally-change-the-way-we-live.aspxAdditive manufacturing can fundamentally change the way we live<p><b>​“I look very much forward to the Materials for tomorrow workshop”, says Uta Klement, Professor in Surface and Microstructure Engineering.This year’s seminar Materials for Tomorrow is devoted to the broad diversity of additive manufacturing, across materials and applications. The topic is &quot;Additive Manufacturing – From academic challenges to industrial practice&quot;. The event will take place online, November 17th, with several internationally recognized speakers. ​</b></p>​​<img src="/en/areas-of-advance/materials/news/PublishingImages/Uta-Klement_MFT.jpg" alt="Uta Klement" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" style="margin:5px" /><span style="background-color:initial"><strong>“There is a very close </strong>cooperation between academia and industry. This is also reflected in CAM2, the Centre for Additive Manufacture – Metal, in which around 25 companies are involved and help define research questions”, says Uta Klement, and she continues:</span><div><br /></div> <div>“To achieve the United Nations SDGs, we need to fundamentally change the way we live, including the way we manufacture products. Additive manufacturing contributes to resource efficiency by reducing material waste and energy consumption. Additive manufacturing, AM, can also help to produce lightweight components, which will help reduce fuel costs and the carbon footprint of, for example, planes, cars, and trucks”.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Uta Klement </strong>is Professor in Materials Science at Chalmers University of Technology with emphasis on Electron Microscopy and is Head of the Division of Materials and Manufacture at the Department of Industrial and Materials Science. She is also heading the Surface and Microstructure Engineering research group.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Why is this technology so interesting?</strong></div> <div>“In addition to rapid prototyping through 3D printing, Additive Manufacturing can offer local on-demand spare parts production, customer-specific products, lightweight construction, functional integration, and the opportunity to implement completely new ideas. Product development and market entry can be accelerated significantly while cost reduction and sustainability goals can be achieved at the same time”, says Uta Klement.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>What is the most exciting in the field?</strong></div> <div>“A broader adoption of the additive manufacturing technology depends on the ability to control the entire eco-system, involving pre-printing, printing, and post-printing. This is what we do in CAM2, the Centre for Additive Manufacture - Metal. In addition to a better understanding of the different parts of the process chain, there is currently much focus on quality assurance and the use of inline process monitoring systems together with AI to detect and avoid defects in built components. Also in operando measurements are of much interest to better understand the process and the formed microstructure.</div> <div>Even though additive manufacturing enables the manufacture of parts with a high degree of complexity, internal cooling channels or lattice structures, the surface integrity of the parts is often of inadequate quality, where values for the surface roughness can be much higher than acceptable for many applications. Therefore, surface integrity plays an important role in defining the part's operational performance, which is why post-processing to improve the surface integrity of additively manufactured parts is critical to the introduction of the technology in its broadest sense and requires more attention”, says Uta.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Which materials can be used in Additive Manufacturing / 3D printing?</strong></div> <div>“Due to their ease of use and low melting temperatures, 3D printing began with polymeric materials. Today, additive manufacturing / 3D printing encompasses most types of materials, from polymers to metals, ceramics to living cells”.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Which is the most advanced object constructed using additive manufacturing?</strong></div> <div>“That is of course a matter of opinion. Being able to make custom body parts after trauma surgery can be seen as very important and advanced. But even parts that cannot be manufactured using conventional, i.e., subtractive processes, including material-saving lightweight structures, are very progressive and require a completely new design. For future space exploration, when we travel to Moon and Mars, Additive Manufacturing will be fundamental for producing the vital infrastructure”.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>What are you most looking forward to at this seminar?</strong></div> <div>“I'm looking forward to interesting lectures that give a broad overview of what can already be done with Additive Manufacturing / 3D printing and what challenges we still face”.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Who should attend to the seminar?</strong></div> <div>“Everyone is welcome, from beginners to experts. I think the seminar offers something for everyone and everyone can learn something new.</div> <div>I hope the participants learn during the seminar that additive manufacturing is very broad and a topic that will keep us busy for the next years to come”, Uta Klement concludes.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="/en/areas-of-advance/materials/Calendar/Pages/Materials-for-Tomorrow-2021.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" /><span style="background-color:initial">P</span><span style="background-color:initial">rogram Materials for Tomorrow 2021 </span></a><br /></div> <span style="background-color:initial"><a href="https://ui.ungpd.com/Surveys/e19f2bbb-3ee3-4e2f-b259-173b334d614a"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Register to the seminar </a></span>Fri, 24 Sep 2021 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/tme/news/Pages/Combating-entrepreneurial-stereotypes-through-education.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/tme/news/Pages/Combating-entrepreneurial-stereotypes-through-education.aspxCombating entrepreneurial stereotypes through education<p><b>​The popular stereotype of entrepreneurs such as Steve Jobs or Elon Musk is of heroic individuals battling alone against the odds. These stereotypes are strongly embedded, but they are limiting, incorrectly framing entrepreneurship as attainable only through unique talent and exceptional skill. Recently published research from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, highlight how introducing questions of identity into entrepreneurial education can help break down these limitations and yield greater diversity in the field.</b></p><div>​&quot;Our research sheds light on the ongoing challenges associated with the prevailing stereotypes in entrepreneurship and its education. Addressing this issue is important for students and educators alike – to raise awareness of how easy it is to overemphasise the common examples of 'Steve Jobs' or 'Elon Musk', and how restricting these examples can be&quot; explains Chalmers researcher Karen Williams-Middleton, who recently published the scientific article <a href="https://doi.org/10.1177/09504222211017436" target="_blank">'The relatable entrepreneur: Combating stereotypes in entrepreneurship education'</a> in the scientific journal Industry and Higher Education, together with Stephanie E Raible at the University of Delaware.</div> <div> </div> <div>&quot;Stereotypes are prominent in entrepreneurship – and therefore entrepreneurial education – and brought into the classroom by both students and educators. They can be a significant limiting factor towards imagining oneself 'becoming entrepreneurial'. Entrepreneurship educators should therefore aim to provide more and varied examples of entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial individuals. Key to this is training students how to practice 'identity management' – understanding and managing other identities they might aspire to, to learn how to 'filter' various social media and environmental influences for themselves,&quot; says Karen Williams-Middleton.</div> <div> </div> <div>Entrepreneurship is often stereotyped as attainable only through exceptional skill and talent, and often characterised exclusively by ostensibly 'masculine' qualities. The article raises discussion of stereotyping in entrepreneurship education, by using the stories of two current female entrepreneurs who themselves struggle with the issue. The two candidates were selected for the mixture of similarities and differences they shared, and because, importantly, both had only recently entered into entrepreneurship. Some of the factors investigated included whether they had co-founders, if they had children, if they received financial support from their spouse, and whether they themselves actually identified as entrepreneurs, or 'small business owners'. </div> <div><img src="/sv/institutioner/tme/nyheter/PublishingImages/karen_w_m_350x305.jpg" alt="Karen Williams-Middleton" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" style="margin:5px;width:200px;height:174px" /><br />&quot;The stories’ similarities and differences mirror the different perspectives and reactions to social media and other environmental inputs that students may experience themselves, thereby opening up for reflection and discussion. Identity management as an important tool in entrepreneurship pedagogy has previously received only limited research attention,&quot; says Karen Williams-Middleton. </div> <div> </div> <div>She continues, &quot;the important thing is to be aware of stereotype use; and then to address it. Try to use a spectrum of examples and engage students in discussion about stereotypes and perceptions. It is surprising how easy and quickly we all fall into different stereotypical perspectives. We should – and do – know better, but it still happens, perhaps because of the lack of familiarity beyond the big names that are reified constantly in the media.&quot; </div> <div> </div> <div><em>Text: Daniel Karlsson and Joshua Worth</em></div> <div> </div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">More on the research:</h2> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2"> </h2> <div>The paper <a href="https://doi.org/10.1177/09504222211017436" target="_blank">&quot;The relatable entrepreneur: Combating stereotypes in entrepreneurship education&quot;</a> in scientific journal Industry and Higher Education is written by Stephanie E Raible, University of Delaware and Karen Williams-Middleton, Chalmers University of Technology. </div> <div><br /></div> <div> </div> <div><strong>For more information, please contact:</strong></div> <div><a href="/en/Staff/Pages/karen-williams.aspx">Karen Williams-Middleton</a>, Associate Professor, Department of Technology Management and Economics, Chalmers University of Technology</div> <div><a href="mailto: karen.williams@chalmers.se">karen.williams@chalmers.se</a></div> <div>+46 31 772 1913</div>Thu, 23 Sep 2021 08:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/The-Seel-test-bed-is-now-officially-underway.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/The-Seel-test-bed-is-now-officially-underway.aspxThe Seel test bed is now officially underway<p><b>​Sweden's largest testbed for electric mobility– SEEL – is now becoming a reality at Gateway Säve in Gothenburg. The initiative will advance the positions for Swedish research and strengthen cooperation on the development of fossil-free, sustainable means of transport – such as electric vehicles, ships and aircraft. </b></p>​<span style="background-color:initial">On 22 September, a symbolic upload was held at Säve Airport, now Gateway Säve, where the construction of the electromobility testbed, SEEL, is now officially underway. Together with Minister for Business, Industry and Innovation Ibrahim Baylan, Castellum, who owns Gateway Säve and Vestia, which is carrying out the construction, Chalmers, Rise and Seel linked up in a symbolic ceremony.</span><div><br /></div> <div>Swedish Electric Transport Laboratory, SEEL, is owned and operated by Chalmers and RISE, in collaboration with Cevt, Scania, Volvo Cars and the Volvo Group and with financial support from the Swedish Energy Agency. SEEL gives industry, academia and institutes in Sweden and Europe access to advanced research infrastructure and provides a platform for collaborations and efficient knowledge development in electromobility. SEEL's facility at Gateway Säve is the largest of a total of three. It will cover 13,300 square meters and be completed in 2023. SEEL's two other facilities are being built in Nykvarn and Borås.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Read more:</strong></div> <div><a href="/en/news/Pages/Electromobility-test-bed-is-being-established.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" /><span style="background-color:initial">E</span><span style="background-color:initial">lectromobility test bed is being established</span></a><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><em>Text: Ingrid Claesson</em></div> Wed, 22 Sep 2021 00:00:00 +0200