News: Centre CMALhttp://www.chalmers.se/sv/nyheterNews related to Chalmers University of TechnologyWed, 27 Oct 2021 04:35:24 +0200http://www.chalmers.se/sv/nyheterhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/researchinfrastructure/CMAL/news/Pages/New-Head-of-Laboratory.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/researchinfrastructure/CMAL/news/Pages/New-Head-of-Laboratory.aspxNew Head of Laboratory<p><b></b></p>​<span style="background-color:initial">Per-Anders Carlsson, former Scientific Coordinator at CMAL and professor at the department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, has taken up duties as the new Head of Laboratory from 1 September. Per-Anders has done an excellent job as Scientific Coordinator and we look forward to continue to work together to further develop CMAL.</span>Tue, 01 Sep 2020 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/researchinfrastructure/CMAL/news/Pages/D8-XRD-installed-and-open-for-users.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/researchinfrastructure/CMAL/news/Pages/D8-XRD-installed-and-open-for-users.aspxD8 XRD installed and open for users<p><b></b></p>​The Chemistry department has kindly donated a powder XRD (Bruker D8) to CMAL. It is now fully operational and open for users. For any questions please contact <a href="mailto:michal.strach@chalmers.se">Michal Strach​</a>. Mon, 23 Mar 2020 00:00:00 +0100https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/New-insights-on-protective-oxide-films-in-high-temperature-materials.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/New-insights-on-protective-oxide-films-in-high-temperature-materials.aspxNew insights on protective oxide films in high temperature materials<p><b></b></p><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/F/Blandade%20dimensioner%20inne%20i%20artikel/oxid_colliander_750x.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px;height:189px;width:300px" /><div>High temperature materials, such as superalloys and high temperature steels, are often employed in extreme conditions where they experience a combination of severe mechanical loads at elevated temperatures in the presence of a corrosive environment. <span style="background-color:initial">To operate  under such conditions these materials rely on the formation and integrity of a thin protective oxide scale, typically less than a micrometer in thickness. </span></div> <div><br /> Anand H S Iyer, Krystyna Stiller and Magnus Hörnqvist Colliander at the Department of Physics at Chalmers recently published new results on microscale fracture of chromia scales in the journal Materialia. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>In their paper they present a new micro-mechanical testing method, which has been shown to be highly effective in measuring the properties of these extremely thin oxide films. </div> <div><br /></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/F/Blandade%20dimensioner%20inne%20i%20artikel/anand_270x.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:170px;height:155px" />&quot;This allows the development of better models for understanding and predicting how and when the protective oxide scales will fail,&quot; says </span>Anand H S Iyer, Doctoral Student <span style="background-color:initial">at the Department of Physics at Chalmers and lead author of the scientific paper. </span></div> <div><br /></div> <div>The study was performed through a collaboration between the researchers at Chalmers and colleagues in Finland and Switzerland. </div> <div><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">Tex</span><span style="background-color:initial">t: Mia Halleröd Palmgren, </span><a href="mailto:mia.hallerodpalmgren@chalmers.se">mia.hallerodpalmgren@chalmers.se​</a><br /></div> <div><div><div></div></div> <div><br /></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2589152919302613"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" /></a></span><a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2589152919302613"><span style="background-color:initial"><span>Read the paper </span>&quot;</span><span style="background-color:initial"><font color="#5b97bf"><b>Microscale fracture of chromia scales&quot;</b></font></span> in Materialia.​​</a></div></div> <div><br /></div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">For more information, contact: </h2> <div><div><strong></strong><span style="background-color:initial"><strong><a href="/sv/personal/Sidor/harihara.aspx">Anand H S Iyer</a></strong>, PhD Student, Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, <a href="mailto:harihara@chalmers.se">harihara@chalmers.se</a>, +46 31 772 67 08</span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><strong><a href="/en/staff/Pages/Krystyna-Marta-Stiller.aspx">Krystyna Stiller​</a></strong>, Professor, Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, <a href="mailto:stiller@chalmer.se">stiller@chalmer.se</a>, +46 31 772 33 20</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong><a href="/en/Staff/Pages/Magnus-Hörnqvist.aspx">Magnus Hörnqvist Colliander</a></strong>, Senior researcher, Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology<span></span>, <a href="mailto:magnus.colliander@chalmers.se">magnus.colliander@chalmers.se​</a>, +46 31 772 33 06</div></div>Thu, 21 Nov 2019 00:00:00 +0100https://www.chalmers.se/en/researchinfrastructure/CMAL/news/Pages/Michal-Strach-joins-CMAL-as-Research-Engineer.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/researchinfrastructure/CMAL/news/Pages/Michal-Strach-joins-CMAL-as-Research-Engineer.aspxMichal Strach joins CMAL as Research Engineer<p><b>​&quot;In October I started working as a research engineer at CMAL, where I am responsible for X-ray scattering experiments.&quot;</b></p>​&quot;​<span style="background-color:initial">I have worked on X-ray diffraction and absorption in the field of material science for the last 6 years, at research institutes in France, Germany, and Switzerland. I specialize in in-situ high temperature scattering experiments in the studies of powders and thin films. I have also worked on approaches to study solvothermal reactions in-situ at elevated temperatures using X-ray absorption spectroscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering. I have experience in developing strategies for synchrotron experimental campaigns and proposal writing. I can treat large datasets generated at synchrotron sources, and design custom heating cells and various pieces of lab equipment (pneumatic syringes, cryo optical cells, motorized stages etc.). I am very excited to join the CMAL team, and I look forward to helping students and researchers at Chalmers in their experimental endeavors.&quot;</span><div><span style="background-color:initial">​<br /></span></div>Fri, 01 Nov 2019 00:00:00 +0100https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Prestigious-grant-to-explore-strong-light-matter-coupling.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Prestigious-grant-to-explore-strong-light-matter-coupling.aspxPrestigious grant to explore strong light-matter coupling<p><b>Researchers from Chalmers have been awarded 25 million kronor through a prestigious project grant from the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation. Over five years, physicists Eva Olsson and Timur Shegai will seek answers to fundamental questions about the interaction between light and matter at room temperature.</b></p><div>“We look forward to combining unique cutting-edge abilities and building a platform for new knowledge about the interaction between light and matter.  We can dive even deeper and push the boundaries of what is possible to understand of both time and space,” says Professor Eva Olsson at the Department of Physics at Chalmers.<br /><span style="background-color:initial"></span></div> <div><br /></div> <div><div>Eva Olsson’s research focuses on investigating materials with the help of electrons exploring properties down to the atomic level. Timur Shegai researches into the same area, but with the help of light studying ultrafast interactions. In the new project, they will combine light, matter, theory and experimentation, together with Chalmers colleagues Ermin Malic and Paul Erhart, as well as Laszlo Veisz at Umea University. In their new project they will explore strong light-matter coupling, where light and matter intermix to form new compositional light-matter quasi-particles called polaritons. Their hybrid character gives polaritons a set of intriguing optical and electronic properties.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Tailoring strong light-matter coupling at room temperature is an important challenge, since today’s quantum technology needs extremely low temperatures and advanced laboratories. Through developing a concept which can work at room temperature, the researchers can create sought after opportunities. </div> <div><br /></div> <div> “We can open doors to new applications in society, such as ultrafast optical switches, quantum information and new energy-saving light sources, for example. Light and matter exist everywhere around us and are essential to our lives. This new knowledge could also be used to customise material properties​, for example the reactivity of chemicals,” says Timur Shegai, Associate Professor at the Department of Physics at Chalmers. </div></div> <div><br /></div> <div></div> <div>In total, the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation has awarded 640 million kronor to 20 pre-eminent basic research projects in the fields of medicine, natural sciences and technology. The projects are seen as offering potential for future scientific breakthroughs.<br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div>The new Chalmers-led project is called “Plasmon-exciton coupling at the attosecond-subnanometer scale: Tailoring strong light-matter interactions at room temperature”​<br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div>Text: Mia Halleröd Palmgren, <a href="mailto:mia.hallerodpalmgren@chalmers.se">mia.hallerodpalmgren@chalmers.se​​</a></div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="https://kaw.wallenberg.org/en/press/20-ground-breaking-research-projects-receive-grants-totaling-sek-640-million"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Read the press release from the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation​</a></div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">The Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation</h2> <div><div>The Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation supports Swedish basic research and education, primarily in medicine, technology and the natural sciences. This is achieved by awarding grants to excellent researchers and projects. <span style="background-color:initial">SEK 30 billion in grants has been awarded since the Foundation was established, with annual funding of SEK 1.8 billion in recent years, making the Foundation the largest private funder of scientific research in Sweden, and one of the largest in Europe.</span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><a href="http://www.kaw.wallenberg.org/"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Read more on Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation</a></span></div></div> ​Tue, 01 Oct 2019 10:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/researchinfrastructure/CMAL/news/Pages/Ludvig-de-Knoop-joins-CMAL-as-Research-Engineer.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/researchinfrastructure/CMAL/news/Pages/Ludvig-de-Knoop-joins-CMAL-as-Research-Engineer.aspxLudvig de Knoop joins CMAL as Research Engineer<p><b>​&quot;In the middle of August, I joined CMAL. Here, I am working with service of the electron microscopes and training and support of the users.&quot;</b></p>​&quot;<span style="background-color:initial">I have for 15 years worked with electron microscopy, both in industry and in academia. In industry I worked with product development and sales of in situ TEM sample holders and during my PhD in France I studied cold-field emission from carbon structures and in situ deformation processes in alumina. The investigation of high-electric field phenomena using in situ TEM continued during my four years of Post Doc here at the Physics Department of Chalmers. </span><div>I look forward to support electron microscopy researchers, to acquire new knowledge and techniques and also to learn about electron microscopy from a different viewpoint. I believe that my knowledge in electron microscopy will be helpful and I am very happy to be working with the skilled and happy CMAL team.&quot;</div> <div>​<br /></div> Fri, 30 Aug 2019 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/A-big-celebration-of-new-research-possibilities.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/A-big-celebration-of-new-research-possibilities.aspxAn international celebration of new research possibilities<p><b>​Chalmers' new electron microscope enables researchers to study and design the smart materials of the future. On 15 May, it was time for the great unveiling of the huge transmission electron microscope (TEM). </b></p><span style="background-color:initial">The unique TEM weighs about five tons and it allows researchers to explore the world of individual atoms. More than a hundred people attended the grand inauguration event and took the chance to learn more about the new possibilities with soft microscopy and materials design. Professor Eva Olsson was the chair of the grand opening ceremony at Chalmers, where researchers and specialists from all over the world created a network – through tying colourful ribbons together. <br /><br /></span><div>Even Chalmers' founder, William Chalmers, seemed to have gained a new lease of life thanks to the excitement of the new microscope. He (or rather Philip Wramsby) moderated the event and let the audience join a journey down the memory lane. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>In the afternoon the seminars at Chalmers attracted many researchers from near and far. The lecture hall Kollektorn was completely crowded when several leading international researchers held their presentations. Special invitees included members of a European network for electron microscopy, in which Chalmers is involved.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>As the microscope has Japanese origin, representatives of the manufacturer, JEOL, from Japan as well as Europe visited Chalmers for this special event. They expressed their joy of seeing the unique instrument installed in Sweden. The day ended, as it should be, with karaoke in Japanese!</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Text: Mia Halleröd Palmgren, <a href="mailto:mia.hallerodpalmgren@chalmers.se">mia.hallerodpalmgren@chalmers.se​</a></div> <div>Images: Johan Bodell, Helén Rosenfeldt and Mia Halleröd Palmgren</div> <div><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLqbS2dTMFA"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" style="font-weight:600" /><b>Watch the inauguration ceremony in the Gustaf Dalén lecture hall, Chalmers, 15 May 2019</b>​</a><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">Read more: </h3> <div><div><a href="http://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Come-and-experience-Chalmers%e2%80%99-unique-electron-microscope.aspx" style="outline:currentcolor none 0px"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="http://www.chalmers.se/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />The unique electron microscope that enables researchers to explore the world of individual atoms</a><br /></div> <div></div> <div>​<a href="/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/How-to-design-smart-materials-for-the-future.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />How to design smart materials for the future</a></div></div> <div><a href="http://www.chalmers.se/sv/institutioner/fysik/nyheter/Sidor/33-miljoner-till-unika-mikroskop.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />33 million for unique microscopes</a><br /></div>Thu, 16 May 2019 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Graphene_sponge_paves_the_way_for_future_batteries.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Graphene_sponge_paves_the_way_for_future_batteries.aspxGraphene sponge paves the way for future batteries<p><b>​To meet the demands of an electric future, new battery technologies will be essential. One option is lithium sulphur batteries, which offer a theoretical energy density roughly five times that of lithium ion batteries. Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, recently unveiled a promising breakthrough for this type of battery, using a catholyte with the help of a graphene sponge. ​​​</b></p><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/F/Blandade%20dimensioner%20inne%20i%20artikel/Graphene%20aerogel%20toppbild%202.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px;height:181px;width:250px" /><div><span style="background-color:initial">The researchers’ novel idea is a porous, sponge-like aerogel, made of reduced graphene oxide, that acts as a free-standing electrode in the battery cell and allows for better and higher utilisation of sulphur. <br /></span><br /></div> <div>A traditional battery consists of four parts. First, there are two supporting electrodes coated with an active substance, which are known as an anode and a cathode. In between them is an electrolyte, generally a liquid, allowing ions to be transferred back and forth. The fourth component is a separator, which acts as a physical barrier, preventing contact between the two electrodes whilst still allowing the transfer of ions. <br /><br /></div> <div>The researchers previously experimented with combining the cathode and electrolyte into one liquid, a so-called ‘catholyte’. The concept can help save weight in the battery, as well as offer faster charging and better power capabilities. Now, with the development of the graphene aerogel, the concept has proved viable, offering some very promising results. <br /><br /></div> <div>Taking a standard coin cell battery case, the researchers first insert a thin layer of the porous graphene aerogel.</div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/F/Blandade%20dimensioner%20inne%20i%20artikel/Carmen%20Cavallo.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:250px;height:218px" />“You take the aerogel, which is a long thin tube, and then you slice it – almost like a salami. You take that slice, and compress it, to fit into the battery,” says Carmen Cavallo of the Department of Physics at Chalmers, and lead researcher on the study. <br /><span style="background-color:initial">Then, a sulphur-rich solution – the catholyte – is added to the battery. The highly porous aerogel acts as the support, soaking </span><span style="background-color:initial">up the solution like a sponge. </span><br /></div> <div>“The porous structure of the graphene aerogel is key. It soaks up a high amount of the catholyte, giving you high enough sulphur loading to make the catholyte concept worthwhile. This kind of semi-liquid catholyte is really essential here. It allows the sulphur to cycle back and forth without any losses. It is not lost through dissolution – because it is already dissolved into the catholyte solution,” says Carmen Cavallo. <br /><br /></div> <div>Some of the catholyte solution is applied to the separator as well, in order for it to fulfil its electrolyte role. This also maximises the sulphur content of the battery. </div> <div>Most batteries currently in use, in everything from mobile phones to electric cars, are lithium-ion batteries. But this type of battery is nearing its limits, so new chemistries are becoming essential for applications with higher power requirements. Lithium sulphur batteries offer several advantages, including much higher energy density. The best lithium ion batteries currently on the market operate at about 300 watt-hours per kg, with a theoretical maximum of around 350. Lithium sulphur batteries meanwhile, have a theoretical energy density of around 1000 to 1500 watt-hours per kg. </div> <div><br /><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/F/Blandade%20dimensioner%20inne%20i%20artikel/Aleksandar%20Matic.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px;height:218px;width:250px" />“Furthermore, sulphur is cheap, highly abundant, and much more environmentally friendly. Lithium sulphur batteries also have the advantage of not needing to contain any environmentally harmful fluorine, as is commonly found in lithium ion batteries,” says Aleksandar Matic, Professor at Chalmers Department of Physics, who leads the research group behind the paper. <br /><br /></div> <div>The problem with lithium sulphur batteries so far has been their instability, and consequent low cycle life. Current versions degenerate fast and have a limited life span with an impractically low number of cycles. But in testing of their new prototype, the Chalmers researchers demonstrated an 85% capacity retention after 350 cycles. <br /><br /></div> <div>The new design avoids the two main problems with degradation of lithium sulphur batteries – one, that the sulphur dissolves into the electrolyte and is lost, and two, a ‘shuttling effect’, whereby sulphur molecules migrate from the cathode to the anode. In this design, these undesirable issues can be drastically reduced. </div> <div><br /></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">The researchers note, however, that there is still a long journey to go before the technology can achieve full market potential. <br />&quot;Since these batteries are produced in an alternative way from most normal batteries, new manufacturing processes will need to be developed to make them commercially viable,&quot; says Aleksandar Matic.</span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><a href="https://www.mynewsdesk.com/uk/chalmers/pressreleases/graphene-sponge-helps-lithium-sulphur-batteries-reach-new-potential-2864214"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Read the press release and download high resolution images. ​​​</a><br /></span><br /></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">Text: Joshua Worth,<a href="mailto:%20joshua.worth@chalmers.se"> joshua.worth@chalmers.se</a></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">Images: Johan Bodell, <a href="mailto:%20johan.bodell@chalmers.se​">johan.bodell@chalmers.se</a></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div>Read the article,<a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378775319300916?via%3Dihub"> “A free-standing reduced graphene oxide aerogel as supporting electrode in a fluorine-free Li2S8 catholyte Li-S battery,”</a> published in the Journal of Power Sources. ​<span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><h3 class="chalmersElement-H3" style="font-family:&quot;open sans&quot;, sans-serif"><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/F/750x340/Graphene%20Aerogel%20Toppbild.jpg" alt="" style="font-size:14px;font-weight:300;margin:5px" />​​​​<span style="background-color:initial;color:rgb(51, 51, 51);font-family:&quot;open sans&quot;, sans-serif;font-size:14px;font-weight:300">The reduced graphene oxide aerogel developed by the researchers, that makes the catholyte concept viable.</span></h3></div> <div>​<br /><span style="color:rgb(33, 33, 33);font-family:inherit;font-size:16px;font-weight:600;background-color:initial">M</span><span style="color:rgb(33, 33, 33);font-family:inherit;font-size:16px;font-weight:600;background-color:initial">ore about the Chalmers lab used in this research </span></div> <div>The researchers investigated the structure of the graphene aerogel at the <a href="/en/researchinfrastructure/CMAL/Pages/default.aspx">Chalmers Materials Analysis Laboratory (CMAL)​</a>. CMAL has advanced instruments for material research. The laboratory formally belongs to the Department of Physics, but is open to all researchers from universities, institutes and industry. The experiments in this study have been carried out using advanced and high-resolution electron microscopes.</div> <div>Major investments, totalling around 66 million Swedish kronor have recently been made to further push CMAL to the forefront of material research.</div> <div>The investments included the purchase of a monochromated and double aberration corrected (CETCOR image and ASCOR probe Cs-correctors) TEM JEOLARM (200 kV) 40-200, equipped with a field emission gun (FEG). This was the first paper to be published with the use of this brand-new microscope, which was used to investigate the structure of the aerogel. <br /><br /></div> <div><a href="/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Come-and-experience-Chalmers’-unique-electron-microscope.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />The new electron microscope, which weighs as much as a full grown elephant, will be formally inaugurated on 15 May in a ceremony at Chalmers. </a></div> <div>The Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation has contributed around half of the investments.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><span style="color:rgb(33, 33, 33);font-family:inherit;font-size:16px;font-weight:600;background-color:initial">For more information, contact:</span><br /></div> <div><strong><a href="/en/Staff/Pages/Carmen-Cavallo.aspx">Carmen Cavallo</a></strong>, <span style="background-color:initial">Researcher, Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, </span><span style="background-color:initial">+46 31 772 33 10, </span><span style="background-color:initial"><a href="mailto:carmen.cavallo@chalmers.se">carmen.cavallo@chalmers.se​</a></span></div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong><a href="/en/staff/Pages/Aleksandar-Matic.aspx">Aleksandar Matic​</a></strong>, P<span style="background-color:initial">rofessor, Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, </span><span style="background-color:initial">+46 31 772 51 76, </span><span style="background-color:initial"><a href="mailto:matic@chalmers.se">matic@chalmers.se </a></span></div>Mon, 29 Apr 2019 07:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Come-and-experience-Chalmers’-unique-electron-microscope.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Come-and-experience-Chalmers%E2%80%99-unique-electron-microscope.aspxCome and experience Chalmers’ unique electron microscope<p><b>​It is the only one of its kind in the world, it weighs about the same as a full-grown bull elephant and it allows us to explore the world of individual atoms.Chalmers' new electron microscope enables researchers to study and design the smart materials of the future – and on the 15 May it is time for the great unveiling.​ </b></p><div><span style="background-color:initial">The event will be open to both r</span><span style="background-color:initial">esearchers and members of the public who want to learn more about the new microscope and the opportunities it will create. Researchers from near and far will come to get acquainted with the advanced equipment and make new connections. Special invitees include members of a European network for electron microscopy, in which Chalmers is involved. There are also several leading researchers in the field from Europe and the rest of the world.<br /></span><br /></div> <div>But first, let us rewind a little – to a snowy day in February 2018, when a truck, loaded with 100 boxes, arrived at Chalmers campus Johanneberg. Eager researchers watched as the precious, long-awaited packages were loosened. There were worries that the lift might not even be able to cope with the weight, but it managed. Almost a year of assembly, installation and adjustment followed, and now the microscope, which weighs five tonnes, is in place at Chalmers Material Analysis Laboratory (CMAL). It sits in a disturbance-protected room with adapted temperature and air conditions and is available to researchers in both the academy and industry.<br /><br /></div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/F/Blandade%20dimensioner%20inne%20i%20artikel/IMG_1755EvaOlsson_01_350x.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="background-color:initial" />“It is great that we can now start all the experiments we have planned – we have a long wish list. When we can study and control different materials, right down to the atomic level, a whole universe of possibilities opens. For example, we can produce more healthy foods, smarter solar cells and more environmentally-friendly textiles and paper,” says Physics Professor Eva Olsson, who is responsible for the microscope project at Chalmers.<br /><br /></div> <div>She has worked hard for Chalmers to be able to buy a total of three advanced electron microscopes that open up new possibilities in soft microscopy. What is now being inaugurated is a transmission electron microscope (TEM) made in Japan by JEOL, by far the standout of the three. The total investment is around 66 million Swedish kronor, of which the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation has contributed half.</div> <div>What is unique about the new, large TEM is its very high spatial and energy resolution. It means it is possible to see how individual atoms are arranged in a material. Through analysis of the different signals coming from the studied materials, it is possible to understand how the arrangement of atoms is correlated to the properties of the material.<br /><br /></div> <div>Although the new microscope has not been formally opened yet, it has already been put to use in certain ways. Professor of physics Aleksandar Matic, and researcher Carmen Cavallo, published an article on how they managed to produce a cathode material for lithium sulphur batteries, based on graphene, allowing for higher energy content and longer lifespan. They investigated the structure of the cathode material using the new microscope. Meanwhile, Eva Olsson's research group has also developed the knowledge about how to make solar cell nanowires more efficient. And with the help of one of the new microscopes, researchers also managed to show that it is possible to melt gold at room temperature.<br /><br /></div> <div>In the future, the microscope will pave the way for new results about a wide spectrum of materials ranging from  food, materials for health and energy to atomically-thin materials, catalysts and quantum computers. The microscope is beneficial for many different research groups at Chalmers, and externally.</div> <div>“When we can optimise different materials so that they behave exactly as we want them to, in as small a size as possible, we can make important progress. This is true for both material science and technology development. In this work we can also contribute to better health and a sustainable environment,” says Eva Olsson. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>Eva Olsson will lead the opening ceremony, but she can also reveal that even Chalmers' founder, William Chalmers, seems to have gained a new lease of life thanks to the excitement of the new microscope. It might just be the case that he too will be on hand to help moderate the ceremony, which will include exciting lectures, insight into the world of the microscope and many opportunities for networking and meeting future contacts.<br /><br /></div> <div>Text: Mia Halleröd Palmgren and Joshua Worth<br /><br /></div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3"><a href="/en/departments/physics/calendar_old/Pages/Inauguration_electronmicroscope_190515.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Read more about the opening ceremony and register here​</a></h3> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/F/Blandade%20dimensioner%20inne%20i%20artikel/Bildcollage_750x230webbkalnedern.jpg" alt="collage" /><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">More about electron microscopy and soft microscopy </h3> <div><span style="background-color:initial">Electron microscopy is a collective term for various types of microscopy using electrons instead of electromagnetic radiation to produce images of very small objects. With the help of this technique, one can pass the resolution of visible light, which makes it possible to study individual atoms.</span><br /></div> <div>With soft microscopy, the electrons that examine the material have lower energy than in an ordinary electron microscope. It makes it possible to explore delicate organic materials such as foods, textiles or tissues, right down to the atomic level, without the material losing its structure.</div> <div>There are different types of electron microscopes, such as transmission electron microscopes (TEM), scanning transmission electron microscopes (STEM), scanning electron microscopes (SEM) and combined Focused Ion Beam and SEM (FIB-SEM).</div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="http://www.chalmers.se/sv/institutioner/fysik/nyheter/Sidor/33-miljoner-till-unika-mikroskop.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />33 million for unique microscopes</a></div> <div><a href="/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/How-to-design-smart-materials-for-the-future.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />How to design smart materials for the future</a></div> <div><a href="/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Fine-tuning-at-the-atomic-level-can-result-in-better-catalysts-and-a-cleaner-environment.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Better catalysts with the help of minimal atomic adjustments </a></div> <div><a href="/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/How-gold-can-melt-at-room-temperature-.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />How to melt gold at room temperature</a></div>Thu, 25 Apr 2019 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/researchinfrastructure/CMAL/news/Pages/CMAL-invests-in-powder-XRD.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/researchinfrastructure/CMAL/news/Pages/CMAL-invests-in-powder-XRD.aspxCMAL invests in powder XRD<p><b></b></p>​<span style="font-size:11pt;background-color:initial">To meet the need of numerous research groups at Chalmers, CMAL will invest in a X-ray diffractometer for powder XRD. The instrument is expected to be installed in the beginning of 2020.</span><p class="MsoNormal"></p>Thu, 21 Mar 2019 00:00:00 +0100https://www.chalmers.se/en/researchinfrastructure/CMAL/news/Pages/Two-vacant-research-engineer-positions.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/researchinfrastructure/CMAL/news/Pages/Two-vacant-research-engineer-positions.aspxTwo vacant research engineer positions<p><b>​​CMAL will employ two research engineers, one with expertise in advanced electron microscopy and one with expertise in various scattering techniques, primarily XRD and SAXS​.</b></p><span style="font-size:11pt;background-color:initial">The duties include support to CMAL users, as well as service, calibration and maintenance of the instruments.<br /></span><span style="font-size:14.6667px">Application deadline: 30 </span><span style="font-size:14.6667px">April </span><span style="font-size:14.6667px">2019.</span><span style="font-size:14.6667px">​</span><span style="font-size:11pt;background-color:initial"><br /><br /></span><a href="/sv/om-chalmers/Arbeta-pa-Chalmers/lediga-tjanster/Sidor/default.aspx"><span><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" /></span> <span style="font-size:11pt;background-color:initial">More information about the positions and how to apply​​​</span></a><p class="MsoNormal"></p>Thu, 21 Mar 2019 00:00:00 +0100https://www.chalmers.se/en/researchinfrastructure/CMAL/news/Pages/Call-for-upgrades-of-CMAL-instruments-2019.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/researchinfrastructure/CMAL/news/Pages/Call-for-upgrades-of-CMAL-instruments-2019.aspxCall for upgrades of CMAL instruments 2019<p><b>​​Researchers from Chalmers and Gothenburg University now have the chance to apply for upgrades or add-ons to the existing instrument portfolio at CMAL.</b></p><span lang="EN-US" style="background:initial;font-size:11pt;color:black">The call is intended to advance and enable research that would meet a deeper and/or wider need among our users. The call is not limited to software or hardware upgrades/add-ons but also includes sample preparation tools or other equipment that would boost research activities at CMAL using the present instrumentation. <span lang="EN-US" style="background:initial;font-size:11pt">Application deadline: 2 </span><span lang="EN-US" style="background-color:initial;font-size:11pt">May 2019.<br /><br /></span><a href="https://chalmers.se/SiteCollectionDocuments/Fysik/CMAL/Cmal.call.upgrades.pdf"><span><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />​</span> More information about the call. ​</a><br /></span><span lang="EN-US" style="background-color:initial;font-size:11pt;color:black"></span><p class="MsoNormal"></p>Wed, 20 Mar 2019 00:00:00 +0100https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/How-gold-can-melt-at-room-temperature-.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/How-gold-can-melt-at-room-temperature-.aspxHow to melt gold at room temperature <p><b>​When the tension rises, unexpected things can happen – not least when it comes to gold atoms. Researchers from, among others, Chalmers University of Technology, have now managed, for the first time, to make the surface of a gold object melt at room temperature.​</b></p><div><div><div>​<span style="background-color:initial">Ludvig de Knoop, from Chalmers’ Department of Physics, placed a small piece of gold in an electron microscope. Observing it at the highest level of magnification and increasing the electric field step-by-step to extremely high levels, he was interested to see how it influenced the gold atoms.</span></div> <div>It was when he studied the atoms in the recordings from the microscope, that he saw something exciting. The surface layers of gold had actually melted – at room temperature.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>&quot;I was really stunned by the discovery. This is an extraordinary phenomenon, and it gives us new, foundational knowledge of gold,” says Ludvig de Knoop.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>What happened was that the gold atoms became excited. Under the influence of the electric field, they suddenly lost their ordered structure and released almost all their connections to each other.</div> <div>Upon further experimentation, the researchers discovered that it was also possible to switch between a solid and a molten structure.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>The discovery of how gold atoms can lose their structure in this way is not just spectacular, but also groundbreaking scientifically. Together with the theoretician Mikael Juhani Kuisma, from the University of Jyväskylä in Finland, Ludvig de Knoop and colleagues have opened up new avenues in materials science. The results are now published in the journal Physical Review Materials. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>Thanks to theoretical calculations, the researchers are able to suggest why gold can melt at room temperature, which has to do with the formation of defects in the surface layers. <br /><br />Possibly, the surface melting can also be seen as a so-called low-dimensional phase transition. In that case, the discovery is connected to the research field of topology, where pioneers David Thouless, Duncan Haldane and Michael Kosterlitz received the Nobel Prize in Physics 2016. With Mikael Juhani Kuisma in the lead, the researchers are now looking into that possibility. In any case, the ability to melt surface layers of gold in this manner enables various novel practical applications in the future.<br /><span style="background-color:initial"></span></div> <div><br /></div> <div>&quot;Because we can control and change the properties of the surface atom layers, it opens doors for different kinds of applications. For example, the technology could be used in different types of sensors, catalysts and transistors. There could also be opportunities for new concepts for contactless components,&quot; says Eva Olsson, Professor at the Department of Physics at Chalmers.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>But for now, for those who want to melt gold without an electron microscope, a trip to the goldsmith is still in order.</div></div> <div><br /></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">Text: </span><span style="background-color:initial"> Joshua Worth,</span><a href="mailto:%20joshua.worth@chalmers.se"> joshua.worth@chalmers.se  </a>and <span style="background-color:initial">M</span><span style="background-color:initial">ia </span><span style="background-color:initial">Hall</span><span style="background-color:initial">eröd</span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"> Palmgren, </span><span style="background-color:initial"><a href="mailto:mia.hallerodpalmgren@chalmers.se">mia.hallerodpalmgren@chalmers.se </a></span><span style="background-color:initial"> </span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="color:rgb(33, 33, 33);font-family:&quot;open sans&quot;, sans-serif;font-size:24px;background-color:initial">About the scientific article</span><br /></div> <div><div><span style="background-color:initial">The article </span><a href="https://journals.aps.org/prmaterials/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevMaterials.2.085006">“Electric-field-controlled reversible order-disorder switching of a metal tip surface </a><span style="background-color:initial">” has been published in the journal Physical Review Materials. It was written by Ludvig de Knoop, Mikael Juhani Kuisma, Joakim Löfgren, Kristof Lodewijks, Mattias Thuvander, Paul Erhart, Alexandre Dmitriev and Eva Olsson. The researchers behind the results are active at Chalmers, the University of Gothenburg,  the University of Jyväskylä in Finland, and Stanford University in the United States.</span></div> <span style="background-color:initial"></span></div> <div><br /></div></div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/F/750x340/GuldSmalterIRumstemperatur_181116_01_750x340px.jpg" alt="" style="font-size:24px;margin:5px" /><span style="background-color:initial"> </span><span style="background-color:initial">Joakim Löfgren, Eva Olsson, Ludvig de Knoop,  Mattias Thuvander, Alexandre Dmitriev and Paul Erhart are some of the researchers behind the discovery. Not pictured are Mikael Juhani Kuisma and Kristof Lodewijks.</span><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">Image: Johan Bodell</span></div> <div><h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">More about the research infrastructure at Chalmers<br /></h3> <div> </div> <div><a href="/en/researchinfrastructure/CMAL/Pages/default.aspx">The Chalmers Material Analysis Laboratory (CMAL) </a> has advanced instruments for material research. The laboratory formally belongs to the Department of Physics, but is open to all researchers from universities, institutes and industry. The experiments in this study have been carried out using advanced and high-resolution electron microscopes - in this case, transmission electron microscopes (TEM). Major investments have recently been made, to further push the laboratory to the forefront of material research. In total, the investments are about 66 million Swedish kronor, of which the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation has contributed half.<span style="background-color:initial"> </span></div> <div> </div> <h4 class="chalmersElement-H4">More about electron microscopy</h4> <div> </div> <div>Electron microscopy is a collective name for different types of microscopy, using electrons instead of electromagnetic radiation to produce images of very small objects. Using this technique makes it possible to study individual atoms. <span style="background-color:initial"> </span></div> <div><div><h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">For more information, contact: </h3></div> <div><div><a href="/sv/personal/Sidor/f00lude.aspx"><span>Ludvig de Knoop</span>, </a>Postdoctoral researcher, Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, +46 31 772 <span style="background-color:initial">51 80, </span><a href="mailto:ludvig.deknoop@chalmers.se​​" style="font-family:calibri, sans-serif;font-size:12pt"><span lang="EN-US">ludvig.deknoop@chalmers.se </span></a></div></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"> <br /></span></div> <div><a href="/sv/personal/Sidor/Eva-Olsson.aspx"><span>Eva Olsson</span><span style="background-color:initial">,</span></a><span style="background-color:initial"> Professor, Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, +46 31 772 32 47, </span><a href="mailto:eva.olsson@chalmers.se" target="_blank">eva.olsson@chalmers.se </a><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="http://www.mynewsdesk.com/uk/chalmers/pressreleases/how-to-melt-gold-at-room-temperature-2799968"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Read the press release and download high-resolution images. </a></div> <div><a href="https://youtu.be/mbKuq1BAfrs"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Watch a <span style="background-color:initial">short video clip with researcher Ludvig de Knoop explaining the discovery.</span>​</a></div> </div></div> ​Tue, 20 Nov 2018 07:00:00 +0100https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/A-popular-course-for-experts-in-electron-microscopy-.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/A-popular-course-for-experts-in-electron-microscopy-.aspxA popular course for experts in electron microscopy<p><b></b></p><div><span style="background-color:initial">More than 50 resea</span><span style="background-color:initial">rchers and specialists in electron microscopy gathered for Chalmers </span><span style="background-color:initial">Microscopy School – SEM 2018 </span><span style="background-color:initial">– </span><span style="background-color:initial">on </span><span style="background-color:initial">23-25 October 2018</span><span style="background-color:initial">. </span><span style="background-color:initial">The three-day course focused on advanced techniques in imaging and microanalysis. </span></div> <div>The yearly event has become a popular meeting place for industrial scientists, specialists and researchers in academia. The course offered both lectures and laboratory sessions – and time to exchange knowledge and ideas. As usual, SEM 2018 was organised Lena Falk and Mats Halvarsson, professors at the Department of Physics at Chalmers. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>Text and images: Mia Halleröd Palmgren, <a href="mailto:mia.hallerodpalmgren@chalmers.se">mia.hallerodpalmgren@chalmers.se​</a></div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="http://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/society-industry/Chalmers%20Microscopy%20School/Pages/default.aspx?fbclid=IwAR38fGLB0yhXHFcTk9DHxBNuzl9ULF5nrHg0BEyStSsyYtrun77WfteeFRg%E2%80%8B"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Read more about Chalmers Microscopy School.​</a></div> <div><br /></div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/F/Blandade%20dimensioner%20inne%20i%20artikel/workshop_photogenic_sampleholder_750x400.jpg" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /></div>Thu, 25 Oct 2018 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Fine-tuning-at-the-atomic-level-can-result-in-better-catalysts-and-a-cleaner-environment.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Fine-tuning-at-the-atomic-level-can-result-in-better-catalysts-and-a-cleaner-environment.aspxBetter catalysts with the help of fine-tuning at the atomic level<p><b>​​By studying materials down to the atomic level, researchers at Chalmers University of Technology have found a way to make catalysts more efficient and environmentally friendly. The results have been published in Nature Communications. The methods can be used to improve many different types of catalysts.​</b></p><div>Catalysts are materials which cause or accelerate chemical reactions. For most of us, our first thought is probably of catalytic converters in cars, but catalysts are used in a number of areas of society – it has been estimated that catalysts are used in the manufacture of more than 90 percent of all chemicals and fuels. No matter how they are used, catalysts operate through complex atomic processes. In the new study from Chalmers, physics researchers combined two approaches to add a new piece to the catalyst puzzle. They used advanced, high-resolution electron microscopy and new types of computer simulations.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>&quot;It is fantastic that we have managed to stretch the limits and achieve such precision with electron microscopy. We can see exactly where and how the atoms are arranged in the structure. By having picometre precision – that is, a level of precision down to one hundredths of an atom’s diameter – we can eventually improve the material properties and thus the catalytic performance,&quot; says Torben Nilsson Pingel, researcher at the Department of Physics at Chalmers and one of the authors of the scientific article.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Through this work, he and his colleagues have managed to show that picometre-level changes in atomic spacing in metallic nanoparticles affect catalytic activity. The researchers looked at nanoparticles of platinum using sophisticated electron microscopes in the Chalmers Material Analysis Laboratory. With method development by ​Andrew Yankovich, the researchers have been able to improve the accuracy and can now even reach sub-picometre precision. Their results now have broad implications.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>&quot;Our methods are not limited to specific materials but instead based on general principles that can be applied to different catalytic systems. As we can design the materials better, we can get both more energy-efficient catalysts and a cleaner environment,&quot; says Eva Olsson, Professor at the Department of Physics at Chalmers.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>The work was carried out within the framework of the Competence Centre for Catalysis at Chalmers. In order to study how small changes in atomic spacing really affect the catalytic process, Mikkel Jørgensen and Henrik Grönbeck, PhD student and Professor at the Department of Physics respectively, performed advanced computer simulations at the national computing centre, located at Chalmers. Using the information from the microscope, they were able to simulate exactly how the catalytic process is affected by small changes in atomic distances.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>“We developed a new method for making simulations for catalytic processes on nanoparticles. Since we have been able to use real values in our calculation model, we can see how the reaction can be optimised. Catalysis is an important technology area, so every improvement is a worthwhile advance – both economically and environmentally,” says Henrik Grönbeck.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Text: <span style="background-color:initial">M</span><span style="background-color:initial">ia </span><span style="background-color:initial">Hall</span><span style="background-color:initial">eröd</span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"> Palmgren, </span><span style="background-color:initial"><a href="mailto:mia.hallerodpalmgren@chalmers.se">mia.hallerodpalmgren@chalmers.se​</a></span><span style="background-color:initial"> </span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">and Joshua Worth,</span><a href="mailto:%20joshua.worth@chalmers.se"> joshua.worth@chalmers.se </a></div> <div><br /></div> <div>Image: Johan Bodell, <a href="mailto:%20johan.bodell@chalmers.se​">johan.bodell@chalmers.se​</a></div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/F/750x340/CMAL_181008_Eva_Henrik_mfl_PM_05_750x340.jpg" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><br />Fine-tuning at the atomic level can result in better catalysts and a cleaner environment. Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology <span style="background-color:initial">have found a way to make catalysts more efficient and environmentally friendly.</span><span style="background-color:initial">  </span><span style="background-color:initial">Professor Henrik Grönbeck, </span><span style="background-color:initial">PhD Student Mikkel </span><span style="background-color:initial">Jørgensen, </span><span style="background-color:initial">Professor Eva Olsson, Doctor Torben Nilsson Pingel and </span><span style="background-color:initial"> </span><span style="background-color:initial">Doctor Andrew Yankovich </span><span style="background-color:initial">have managed to show that picometre-level changes in atomic spacing in metallic nanoparticles affect catalytic activity.</span><span style="background-color:initial"> </span></div> <div></div> <span></span><div><span style="background-color:initial"></span></div> <div></div> <div><br /></div> <h5 class="chalmersElement-H5">About the scientific article</h5> <div>The article <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-018-05055-1">&quot;Influence of atomic site-specific strain on catalytic activity of supported nanoparticles&quot; </a>has been published in Nature Communications, and is written by Torben Nilsson Pingel, Mikkel Jørgensen, Andrew B. Yankovich, Henrik Grönbeck and Eva Olsson at the Department of Physics and the Competence Centre for Catalysis, at Chalmers University of Technology.</div> <div><a href="https://www.nanowerk.com/spotlight/spotid=50796.php"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />A more accessible scientific article has also been published by the researchers in the journal Nanowerk. </a></div> <div><br /></div> <h5 class="chalmersElement-H5">More about the research infrastructure at Chalmers</h5> <div>The Chalmers Material Analysis Laboratory (CMAL) has advanced instruments for material research. The laboratory formally belongs to the Department of Physics, but is open to all researchers from universities, institutes and industry. The experiments in this study have been carried out using advanced and high-resolution electron microscopes - in this case, transmission electron microscopes (TEM). Major investments have recently been made, to further push the laboratory to the forefront of material research. In total, the investments are about 66 million Swedish kronor, of which the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation has contributed half.</div> <a href="http://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/How-to-design-smart-materials-for-the-future.aspx"><div><br /></div> <div><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Read a previous news article: <span style="background-color:initial">How to design smart materials for a sustainable future </span>​</div> <div><br /></div></a><a href="http://www.chalmers.se/sv/forskningsinfrastruktur/CMAL/Sidor/default.aspx"><div><span><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" /></span>Read more about Chalmers Material Analysis Laboratory.​</div></a><div><br />​<a href="http://www.chalmers.se/en/centres/KCK/Pages/default.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Read more about the Competence Centre for Catalysis at Chalmers. </a></div> <div><br /></div> <div>The computer simulations were performed at the Chalmers Centre for Computational Science and Engineering (C3SE), which is a centre for scientific and technical calculations at Chalmers. C3SE is one of six centres in the national metacentre, the Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing (SNIC).</div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="https://www.c3se.chalmers.se/"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Read more about Chalmers Centre for Computational Science and Engineering - C3SE​​</a><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <h5 class="chalmersElement-H5">More about electron microscopy</h5> <div>Electron microscopy is a collective name for different types of microscopy, using electrons instead of electromagnetic radiation to produce images of very small objects. Using this technique makes it possible to study individual atoms. There are different types of electron microscopes, such as transmission electron microscopes (TEM), scanning transmission electron microscopes (STEM), scanning electron microscopes (SEM) and combined Focused Ion Beam and SEM (FIB-SEM). </div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/F/750x340/CMAL_181008_Eva_Henrik_titan06_750x340.jpg" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><br />The experiments in this study have been carried out using advanced and high-resolution electron microscopes - in this case, transmission electron microscopes (TEM) at <span style="background-color:initial">Chalmers Material Analysis Laboratory</span><span style="background-color:initial">  in Gothenburg, Sweden. Image: Johan Bodell</span></div> <div><div> </div> <h4 class="chalmersElement-H4"><span>For more information, contact: </span></h4></div> <div><a href="/sv/personal/Sidor/Eva-Olsson.aspx">Eva Olsson</a><span style="background-color:initial">, Professor, Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, +46 31 772 32 47, </span><a href="mailto:eva.olsson@chalmers.se">eva.olsson@chalmers.se </a><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="/sv/personal/Sidor/Henrik-Gronbeck.aspx">Henrik Grönbeck</a>, Professor, Department of Physics, Competence Centre for Catalysis, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, +46 31 772 29 63,<a href="mailto:%20henrik.gronbeck@chalmers.se"> henrik.gronbeck@chalmers.se​​​</a><span style="background-color:initial">​</span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><div><a href="https://www.mynewsdesk.com/uk/chalmers/pressreleases/understanding-catalysts-at-the-atomic-level-can-provide-a-cleaner-environment-2753174"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Read the press release and download high-resolution images. ​</a></div></span></div>Wed, 10 Oct 2018 01:00:00 +0200