Jonas Hannestad

Industrial Post Doc, Biological Physics, Department of Physics

Every year there are approximately 10 million new cases of dementia worldwide. Today more than 45 million people are living with dementia, a figure that will almost double every 20 years. This increase is largely caused by an aging population and finding effective treatments is an ever-growing concern. The far most common form of dementia is Alzheimer’s disease, accounting for between 50 and 70% of the cases. As of today, there is no cure for Alzheimer’s disease and available treatments only offer a limited symptomatic relief. There is also a need for methods that allow diagnosis at earlier stages of the disease.

In my research, I strive to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms behind Alzheimer’s disease. A better understanding of the processes that drive disease progression can hopefully lead to potential new means to treat and diagnose Alzheimer’s disease. My primary research focus lie in understanding the importance of the interaction between Alzheimer’s-associated peptides and proteins such as Amyloid-b and Tau with lipid membranes. I approach these challenges working with a broad focus ranging from studies of molecular distribution and co-localization in the brains of Alzheimer’s-affected mice to biophysical studies of protein-membrane interactions.

To cover this wide range of perspectives I employ a diverse spectrum of experimental techniques, including imaging mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy (e.g. TIRF and TCSPC) and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM-D).
In my research at the Division of Biological Physics and at RISE – Research Institutes of Sweden, I strive to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms behind Alzheimer’s disease.

Every year there are approximately 10 million new cases of dementia worldwide. Today more than 45 million people are living with dementia, a figure that will almost double every 20 years. This increase is largely caused by an aging population and finding effective treatments is an ever-growing concern. The far most common form of dementia is Alzheimer’s disease, accounting for between 50 and 70% of the cases. As of today, there is no cure for Alzheimer’s disease and available treatments only offer a limited symptomatic relief. There is also a need for methods that allow diagnosis at earlier stages of the disease.

A better understanding of the processes that drive disease progression can hopefully lead to potential new means to treat and diagnose Alzheimer’s disease. My primary research focus lie in understanding the importance of the interaction between Alzheimer’s-associated peptides and proteins such as Amyloid-b and Tau with lipid membranes. I approach these challenges working with a broad focus ranging from studies of molecular distribution and co-localization in the brains of Alzheimer’s-affected mice to biophysical studies of protein-membrane interactions.

To cover this wide range of perspectives I employ a diverse spectrum of experimental techniques, including imaging mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy (e.g. TIRF and TCSPC) and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM-D).

Published: Sun 14 May 2017.