News: Next Stop Student Ambassadorhttp://www.chalmers.se/sv/nyheterNews related to Chalmers University of TechnologyWed, 04 Aug 2021 10:55:39 +0200http://www.chalmers.se/sv/nyheterhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/education/studying-at-Chalmers/stuamb/Pages/How-Chalmers-contributes-to-society.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/education/studying-at-Chalmers/stuamb/Pages/How-Chalmers-contributes-to-society.aspxHow Chalmers contributes to society<p><b>​If you’ve ever wondered what you will do with your degree after completing your master's programme,  then this blog is for you.</b></p><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/banner-contributes.png" alt="Nathaly writing something on the blackboard" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><div><span style="background-color:initial">I just finished my first year in the <a href="/en/education/programmes/masters-info/Pages/Biomedical-engineering.aspx" title="Link to Biomedical Engineering Program">Biomedical Engineering master’s programme at Chalmers</a>. After this amazing year full of experiences, I've noticed some things. Chalmers is not only preparing technical professionals but also people that are involved with society.</span><div>How does Chalmers do that?</div> <div>There are a lot of ways Chalmers contributes to society, but I'm going to tell you about my two close experiences about it. The first one was with one of my courses, <a href="https://student.portal.chalmers.se/en/chalmersstudies/courseinformation/Pages/SearchCourse.aspx?course_id=27484&amp;parsergrp=3" title="Link to Health Informatics">Health Informatics</a>. The second one was with my part-time job at <a href="/sv/samverkan/skolsamverkan/Grundskolan/Sidor/laxhjalpsstart.aspx?fbclid=IwAR2BaQl3p7iHqfRyCe8c4zAWk1dx1lOceUQHwC9IQKXrcXrY_vB8a23HdS0" title="Link to Pluggstöd">Pluggstöd</a>. </div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Health Informatics:</strong></div> <div>The thing that I liked the most about this course was the project we needed to develop. Most of the projects had an impact on society in some way - Health informatics in developing countries, eHealth in rural areas, digital solutions for mental health, digital health for diabetics, AI in healthcare, and the list goes on. While working on my project - Health informatics in developing countries, I met nice people from several countries. We were a group of five students from Sweden, the US, India, and Ecuador. We researched eHealth in several developing countries to find out what they have in common. We learnt from those cases and analyzed the reasons behind the success and failures. We delivered a document with those findings and some recommendations to help developing countries overcome the usual challenges that occur when implementing an eHealth project. We noticed that people don’t have enough digital skills in developing countries, nor sufficient infrastructure to digitalize their health services. If you come from a developing country like me, you would probably relate and agree with what I just described. For me, it was important to think, along with my classmates, about possible solutions for helping these countries. We all agreed that education is essential not only for improving the health system but also for having a better society overall. So, the way I see it, you could contribute enormously if you invest your time wisely by helping others. Educating people to develop or improving digital skills is contributing to building a better society and that’s exactly what I am passionate about!</div> <div><br /></div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/additional%20picture-contributes.png" alt="Picture of blackboard with some text on it" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" style="margin:5px" />By the end of the course, all the groups did an oral presentation. By listening to their presentations, I realized that this course made us consider other people's needs. For example, I didn’t know Sweden has rural areas, where access to health is more challenging. I’m sure that my classmates also found out how Health Institutions work in developing countries. I also realized diabetic people have a hard time already with the disease, and they need digital solutions to help them overcome it. This course was not only preparing us professionally in the Biomedical Engineering field but was also making us aware of what's out there to find a way to help. I believe that the lecturers from this course wanted us to get involved with real-life problems. We have had a  first introduction and now   it’s up to us to involve a little bit more to start contributing to society.  Yeah, maybe we didn't develop a medical device or software. But, who knows? Perhaps one of us saw the need, did the research, met the right people, and  is ready to move it to a higher level. The takeaway message is that Chalmers will guide you to consider different perspectives no matter what programme you choose.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Pluggstöd:</strong></div> <div>In a previous blog, Teanette, Mohsén and I described our<a href="/en/education/studying-at-Chalmers/stuamb/Pages/Pursuing-a-part-time-job-while-studying-at-Chalmers.aspx" title="Link to part-time job blog"> part-time jobs while studying at Chalmers</a>. Mine was Pluggstöd, an organization lead by Chalmers that offers math and science tutoring for middle-school kids in Gothenburg. By the end of the school year, we shared experiences, and I learned more about this organization. Turns out that Chalmers has a designated budget for helping students from these schools. This means that Chalmers is the one paying us, tutors, not the schools. After knowing that, I was curious, so I asked “why?”. And turns out that a way of contributing to society is aiding the school education and increasing the interest and motivation for subjects like math and science. I have always believed that kids are the future. Very cliché, I know. But, I've seen how every generation changes the way things work. So, if we aim for a better future, we must strive for better people. That's precisely how Chalmers contributes to society. By funding Pluggstöd, we had the opportunity to meet these kids and help them with their homework. Some of the tutors agreed that some students were grateful and learned more than just math or science. By the end of the year, they were inspired by us and wanted to study at Chalmers someday.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>I hope you also feel inspired after reading this blog. I know not all people have the same interests. But if you really care about making an impact after completing your studies, Chalmers is the right place for you.</div> <div><br /></div> <span style="background-color:initial"><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/Student%20Ambassadors%20Pictures%20-%20Authors/Nathaly_studentblog.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="Picture of Nathaly" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><br />Author: <a href="https://api.unibuddy.co/og/chalmers-university-of-technology/buddies/students/5fa532ccac6e5303f48e5b5b?buddyPosition=share" title="Link to Nathaly's Unibuddy">Nathaly​</a></span></div>Mon, 05 Jul 2021 10:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/education/studying-at-Chalmers/stuamb/Pages/My-digital-ambassador-experience.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/education/studying-at-Chalmers/stuamb/Pages/My-digital-ambassador-experience.aspxMy digital ambassador experience<p><b>This is how it feels to be a Chalmers digital ambassador.​</b></p><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/Blog-Banner-Unibuddy.jpg" alt="Picture of all 2021 ambassadors together" style="margin:5px" /><br /><div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">I remember that after being accepted at Chalmers, I was curious about how my new life was gonna be. I watched almost every webinar, and I connected to nearly every live on <a href="https://www.instagram.com/we.are.chalmers/" target="_blank" title="Link to Wearechalmers Instagram page">@we.are.chalmers Instagram</a>. I also checked all the Chalmers platforms and looked for advice from current students in Unibuddy. I was excited, and I'm sure you, an accepted student, are too! I texted a Unibuddy called Jason; he was a <a href="/en/education/programmes/masters-info/Pages/Biomedical-engineering.aspx" title="Link to Biomedical Engineering page">Biomedical Engineering</a> Master's student, just like me. So, I asked him how the programme was, how much study load would I be having, the main research fields in Biomedical, and of course, the weather. I got some really good advice from him and felt that I would have liked to do the same thing for others. At that moment, it hit me; I was sure that I wanted to become a digital ambassador.</span><div><br /><div>When I arrived at Gothenburg and started my master's student's life, I enjoyed the city vibes during the first few weeks. There's a committee at Chalmers that welcomes new students and prepare activities for them: going around the city, going to the woods, going to the sauna, and so on. I was waiting to see how one can become an ambassador, so I checked regularly @we.are.chalmers IG to be informed. When the call for ambassadors opened, I received an email about it. I didn't hesitate and prepared my application to become a content creator and a Unibuddy. Luckily, after an interview, Chalmers decided I could perform as an ambassador; I was thrilled! </div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">W</span><span style="background-color:initial">riting blogs, eventually participating in a YouTube video, handling the @we.are.chalmers IG account, and being a Unibuddy are my main tasks as a digital ambassador.</span></div> <div>Why is it so cool?</div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/blog-additional2-unibuddy.PNG" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="Picture of a few messages on Unibuddy application" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br />Being an ambassador allows you to share your thoughts and experiences while helping students from all over the world. But so far, what has been really amazing for me, is being a Unibuddy. It is a platform where you can chat with current students at Chalmers. There are Unibuddies from different programmes, so if you are wondering where should I find a Unibuddy, you can click <a href="/en/education/meet-chalmers/connect-with-student/pages/default.aspx" title="Link to Unibuddy's page">here</a>. I got questions from people from all over the world, including India, Iran, Sweden, the US, Honduras, Spain, Ecuador, and the list goes on… I get the usual questions about my experiences with accommodation, student life, scholarships, and the application process. But what I have liked the most so far has been how grateful and friendly they can be. Once I answered their questions, if they felt co<span style="background-color:initial">nfident enough, they started sharing how excited they are about coming to Chalmers, for example.</span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div>I have had three amazing experiences where those people started trusting me and sharing how their processes in applying to Chalmers were going. It was amazing to see that even though we only communicate through the platform, and all we know is our first names, they showed a little bit of their personalities while chatting.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>The other nice thing about being a digital ambassador is that you are part of a team of other ambassadors. Imagine you just got to this new city and are finding a way to make new friends. All of a sudden, you get accepted to be a digital ambassador along with other people. You hang around with them so much that you are no longer part-time working. You are also getting together just for fun! I wouldn't have met these amazing people if I didn't apply to be a digital ambassador. You start by working together but build up a friendship at the same time. I remember Sena, Teanette, Marija, Abril, and I started watching a series together. It was a cool thing to do! We got together for Christmas and now casually go hiking or just have a fika together. And, of course, we all know we are there for each other. The phone is always on alert mode if something was to happen to any of us, or if we need advice from each other. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>Being a Chalmers digital student ambassador not only gives you a responsibility, but it will also probably give you some new friends. The way I see it, being an ambassador is about retrieving all the good things you received from another ambassador. It's having fun by living as a student and letting prospective students have an idea of what to expect when they arrive. I'm sure you are as curious as I was when I was accepted; maybe you are also checking all the platforms. I have been in your shoes as an admitted student, and you'll be in mine later as a first-year student. So, why not apply for being the next digital ambassador and help the next you?</div> <div><br /></div> <span style="background-color:initial"><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/Student%20Ambassadors%20Pictures%20-%20Authors/Nathaly_studentblog.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="Picture of Nathaly" style="margin:5px;width:150px;height:150px" /><br /><br /><br />Author: <a href="https://api.unibuddy.co/og/chalmers-university-of-technology/buddies/students/5fa532ccac6e5303f48e5b5b?buddyPosition=share" title="Link to Nathaly's Unibuddy">Nathaly</a>​</span></div></div>Mon, 28 Jun 2021 10:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/education/studying-at-Chalmers/stuamb/Pages/How-Chalmers-has-changed-our-outlook-.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/education/studying-at-Chalmers/stuamb/Pages/How-Chalmers-has-changed-our-outlook-.aspxHow Chalmers has changed our outlook<p><b>​Feeling anxious or stressed is something you don't have to deal with alone. </b></p><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/Banner_Outlook-01.jpg" alt="Picture of Marija and Nathaly Meditating outdoor" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><div><span style="background-color:initial">Mental health is an important topic nowadays, especially since the pandemic was declared. Many of us felt anxious, given the uncertainty we were living in then and may still be living now. The whole process of being admitted to a master's programme at Chalmers, moving to Sweden, and start our studies during a pandemic has been quite an exciting journey.</span><div><br /><div><strong>Marija:</strong></div> <div>Social anxiety is something I have been dealing with my whole life. I have been dealing with it in the context of the educational environment too.  It is something that is an individual problem, and everyone experiences it differently. For me, it comes in the form of very persistent overthinking. Even now, while I am writing this, I am questioning everything that I do: Is the grammar correct? Are the sentences too long? Am I including all the perspectives? Will prospective students find this interesting? Do I have enough time to think about all these things and what is time, in fact? Obviously, I get carried away sometimes and become paralyzed in my thoughts. Nevertheless, the environment can greatly affect your thinking and perspective on life and social conduct and taking a step towards changing it can be scary. Starting my studies at Chalmers was like learning a new language, besides Swedish, and this time with the questions that help your thinking and do not harm it. Coming from an educational environment where the goal was to achieve a certain grade or final product; to an environment where the education itself is the focus has been eye-opening. All of the expectations that people had from me in terms of performance are gone and the only expectation left is to be interested in learning. Communication with the professors and teachers' assistants has become a more pleasant activity for me since there is no pressure put on you to answer a specific question, but rather answering the questions together in an engaging discourse. This kind of a change has made me more aware of which things in life I give importance to and more excited about exploring the world of science.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Nathaly:</strong></div> <div>Everyone faces problems in their own way. In my case, I try to get ahead of the problem to figure out how I will handle it. Anxiety can show up in a lot of different ways, I would say. For me, anxiety is exactly what I described, getting ahead of the situation. Perhaps it could be a good thing, and that's the way I see it. I used to overthink about how to use my time wisely before coming to Chalmers. The time I take in overthinking is valuable as well, and I was wasting it. Once I got here, my perspective around the workload changed completely. I stopped being a workaholic, or at least I try to. I divide my time into classes, a part-time job that makes me happy (<a href="/en/education/studying-at-Chalmers/stuamb/Pages/Pursuing-a-part-time-job-while-studying-at-Chalmers.aspx" title="Link to part-time job blog">you can read more about it in a previous blog</a>), have a social life, and of course, time for myself. And let me tell you, it feels great! I was told that it would be okay to feel down during the winter in Sweden due to the darkness. I also spent a lot of time getting ahead of it. Little did I know that it wasn't going to be so bad. So far, I haven't felt the need to approach a specialist to be mentally healthy, even though I know it's important. Back in Ecuador, my home country, mental health is not taken very seriously within my social group. Chalmers has shown me that it is as important as checking your blood pressure or glucose levels. I know for a fact that the day I feel like talking to a professional about how I'm feeling, I will have full access to do so and that I don't have to be ashamed of it.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">We, as Chalmerists, know that every person is different. Some people get triggered by studies. Some others find it social situations challenging. Maybe others get too stressed about the future. Whatever the reason is, Chalmers has your back. There is a website called <a href="https://feelgood.se/" target="_blank" title="Link to Feelgood.se">feelgood.se</a> meant to help every Chalmerist in a study-related problem. So if you feel you are under a lot of pressure, you’re overwhelmed, or just don’t feel mentally good, you can log into it and ask for help. There is another important service Chalmers offers, <a href="https://student.portal.chalmers.se/en/contactservice/Pages/Study-with-disabilities.aspx" title="Link to Funka">Funka</a>. This is made for students with disabilities. Meaning that, Chalmers actually has a place for each of you.</span><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <span style="background-color:initial"><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/Student%20Ambassadors%20Pictures%20-%20Authors/Marija_studentblog.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="Picture of Marija" style="margin:5px" /><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/Student%20Ambassadors%20Pictures%20-%20Authors/Nathaly_studentblog.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="Picture of Nathaly" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><br />Author: <a href="https://api.unibuddy.co/og/chalmers-university-of-technology/buddies/students/5fa5c9b24d9e1a4e588dffde?buddyPosition=share" title="Link to Marija's Unibuddy">Marija </a>and <a href="https://api.unibuddy.co/og/chalmers-university-of-technology/buddies/students/5fa532ccac6e5303f48e5b5b?buddyPosition=share" title="Link to Nathaly's Unibuddy">Nathaly</a></span></div></div>Mon, 31 May 2021 09:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/education/studying-at-Chalmers/stuamb/Pages/Healthcare-for-international-students-in-Gothenburg.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/education/studying-at-Chalmers/stuamb/Pages/Healthcare-for-international-students-in-Gothenburg.aspxHealthcare for international students in Gothenburg<p><b>​Being ill in a foreign country can be scary and overwhelming. Luckily in Sweden, affordable healthcare is accessible even to international students.   </b></p><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/Health_Banner.png" alt="Picture of Teanette desk with medical drugs on it" style="margin:5px;width:690px;height:313px" /><br /><br /><div><span style="background-color:initial">In March 2021, I received a positive test result for Covid19. I was lucky – my symptoms were not severe, I could continue my studies and part-time work from home, and I had my fiancé to look after me . After two weeks of isolation (and with lots of chicken soup and vitamin C) I was back on track and fully recovered. However, my experience made me realize that, no matter how careful you are, nothing can completely eliminate the risk of becoming ill. Here is what I learned about seeking healthcare in Gothenburg, Sweden. </span><div><br /><div><strong>1. Get your Swedish personal number </strong></div> <div>If you’ve started preparing for your stay in Sweden, you’re probably sick of hearing about personal numbers. But it cannot be emphasized enough: if you are eligible for a personal number, get it as soon as possible!!! It entitles you to the same health benefits as Swedish citizens, and makes the whole healthcare process a lot simpler. </div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>2. Find a Healthcare center</strong></div> <div>There are a couple of different ways to get in contact with a doctor in Sweden. The easiest for me was to go to <a href="http://www.1177.se/" target="_blank" title="Link to 1177">www.1177.se</a>, where you can create an account, find healthcare centers close to you, book appointments, and <a href="https://www.1177.se/en/Vastra-Gotaland/other-languages/other-languages/soka-vard/studenter-fran-andra-lander-att-soka-vard---andra-sprak---vastra-gotaland/" target="_blank" title="Link to 1177">find relevant health recommendations</a>. You can also contact 1177 by phone to get medical advice from a nurse, and (for those who aren’t yet comfortable in Swedish) there is even an option to get information in English. </div> <div>Alternatively, you can call your registered healthcare center directly. If you have a permanent address in Gothenburg and a personal number, you will automatically be registered to the health center closest to you. You can change your registered healthcare center on 1177.se. Note, this does not limit you to only visiting that healthcare center! </div> <div>If contacting 1177 seems too intimidating to you (let’s be real here, nobody actually enjoys phoning the doctor’s office), you can phone the friendly Chalmers Feelgood healthcare center first, or visit their website at student.feelgood.se. Their goal is to help students find the appropriate medical care for their situation. They specialize in study-related illnesses and can support students through physical appointments or web-based visits. If your illness does not fall in the scope of what Feelgood can assist you with, they will provide relevant advice and refer you to different care provider. </div> <div>In case of emergencies or urgent healthcare, you can phone 112 which is the common emergency phone number in Sweden. </div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>3. Fees</strong></div> <div>Although I could take a covid test for free because I had symptoms, there is usually a small fee when you seek Swedish healthcare. However, I was pleasantly surprised at how affordable professional healthcare was in Gothenburg for those who have a Swedish person number. Although patient fees may vary, a standard doctor’s visit can cost between 150-250 SEK. I’ve heard from a friend that students without a person number can expect to pay anything from 400-1400 SEK for a doctor’s visit, although this depends very much on the reason for the appointment and the consultation itself. For students without a personal number, getting a good health insurance to ensure affordable healthcare is very important!</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>4. Personal Experience with Healthcare in Gothenburg</strong></div> <div>I contacted the health center at Gibraltargatan, which is less than 200 meters from Chalmers library. They were able to help me quickly and efficiently in English, and I was able to go for a Covid test (and receive the result) in less than 48 hours after I first suspected I was ill. For free! On my 1177.se account I received the relevant information I needed to take care of my Covid infection. After two weeks, I was contacted to confirm whether I was fully recovered. The most unpleasant part of the experience was having to use the Covid self-test kit – I never again want to come close to a cotton swab...</div> <div><br /></div> <div>My fellow student ambassador, Sena, also visited this health center for a physiotherapy appointment, although she had to book it a week in advance. How soon you get an appointment varies on the severity of your symptoms as well as the individual health center. In her opinion, it was one of the best medical appointments she has ever been to, because the physiotherapist took a holistic approach to health. Not only was her physical injury considered, but also her habits around the injury, her feelings towards the injury and her mental approach towards healing. Hearing about this made me happy, and confirmed what I had heard about Sweden’s high-standard medical service. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>Lastly, it is important to note that dental care in Sweden plays by different rules than other medical services. Up until the year that you turn 23, students can receive free dental care in Gothenburg. I managed to get a free appointment just before my cutoff age, and found the service to be helpful and professional. However, for those of you that are older, going to the dentists requires a hefty fee. Best get that smile checked out in your home country to be safe!</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Remember:</strong> prevention is better than cure! My Swedish friends love advising multivitamins, healthy diets, exercise and taking fikas in the sun as the best medicine against illness. That being said, medical advice and care is easily accessible if you need it. Let’s all do the most to take care of ourselves!</div> <div><br /></div> <span style="background-color:initial"><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/Student%20Ambassadors%20Pictures%20-%20Authors/Teanette_studentblog.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="Picture of Teanette" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">Author: <a href="https://api.unibuddy.co/og/chalmers-university-of-technology/buddies/students/5fb6991683fa8003cd884638?buddyPosition=share" title="Link to Teanette's Unibuddy">Teanette​</a></span></div></div>Mon, 24 May 2021 10:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/education/studying-at-Chalmers/stuamb/Pages/Things-you-buy-on-a-budget.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/education/studying-at-Chalmers/stuamb/Pages/Things-you-buy-on-a-budget.aspxThings you buy on a budget<p><b>​Here are all the things you will need to buy for your student apartment, and how you can buy them on a budget! </b></p><div><div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/Budget_Banner6-01.jpg" alt="Picture of Nathaly showing plants and flower pots" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br />It has almost been a year since I got to Gothenburg to pursue my master's programme in <a href="/en/education/programmes/masters-info/Pages/Biomedical-engineering.aspx" title="Link to Biomedical Engineering Page">Biomedical Engineering​</a> at Chalmers. Let me tell you my experience when decorating and settling in my new home. First, I would like to say that, as an international fee paying-student, Chalmers helped me finding accommodation. I was offered an apartment of 18 sqm—approximately 1.5 km from Johanneberg Campus. My place is furnished with a single bed, desk, dining table, chairs, a little kitchenette, and a small fridge. On my way to making this place a home, I decided it was a good idea to divide my shopping list into sections and assign a budget for each of them.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Bedroom</strong></div> <div>Having a good night of sleep is as important as eating to me! So I needed to be super comfy when I went to bed. Comfy for me is having an incredible memory foam pillow, a super soft pillow to hold, and a warm duvet for the cold nights to come. Of course, you need to add to the budget the price of one cover for every item (since those are often sold separately).</div> <div>Even though you can find one or more of these items in second-hand stores, I didn't want to risk having a bad experience (since I'm a little picky when it comes to hygiene). So I got all these at the fabulous Ikea. My budget was 1200 SEK, but I ended up spending 917 SEK.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Kitchen</strong></div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/Budget_Picture2-01.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="Picture of a kitchen" style="margin:5px" />A<span style="background-color:initial">nother essential section of the house is the kitchen! In here you get a fridge, a kitchenette with two stoves, and shelves lots of shelves. You’ll need things to fill those shelves up like cookwares. With these cookwares, you'll prepare and serve delicious meals that will fill your belly and warm your heart. You already know the basics; pots and pans, spoons, knives, dishes, cutlery, glasses, cups. If you love coffee as much as I do, you'll definitely need a coffee maker or a french press (which is very common to use here in Sweden).</span></div> <div>Where can you get these items? I was able to find some dishes and cups for absolutely nothing a room outside my residence. In that place, other students leave things they do not want any more when moving out. It is usually located nearby the residences. For example, in my case, the free-things room is located at the center of the residences in Emilsborg. But don’t worry, this is not the only place that has it. I know from my friends that they have it too and that it’s also located in a centric area where they live. This is an excellent idea, especially if you don't mind having your kitchen items unmatched. There are some cool places around the city where you can buy second-hand cutlery, dishes, spoons and more, for a lower price. Again, if your eyes don't twinkle when your fork is not the same style as your knife or spoon, this is the place for you. If you are lucky, you'll get the same type of everything you need, but it does not always happen.</div> <div>For pots, pans, knives, and french press, I preferred using new items. You already know where I went, right? My budget here was 700 SEK and since I actually spent 453 SEK, I was super happy about this!</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Bathroom</strong></div> <div>Nothing better than a comforting shower to start and end your day. I believe you'll need a shower curtain, soft towels, and maybe a bathroom carpet. Again, a clean space makes me happy, so I went for completely new items even if you can find these second-hand for a cheaper price. If you are super organized and have tons of bathing supplies, you may need a cabinet.  My budget was 450 SEK and spent 309 SEK, not bad.</div> <div>Home office:</div> <div>One of my favorite places at home, especially now that we have blended studies at Chalmers with the education being both on campus and online. I have many &quot;office supplies,&quot; so I definitely needed an organizer (or more than one). I got used to using two screens in my home country when working or studying. When I got here, I could find a good, used monitor on Facebook marketplace for an affordable price. It's all about fishing for the perfect match between price and quality. So if you are on a budget, this is a must-place to look for you. Since these are things I can easily clean, I could go for second-hand or look in the free-things room. This is how I found my desk chair; I was able to get it for the fantastic price of zero Swedish kronor by finding it there and bringing it to my apartment. This is the section that makes me happiest because I budgeted 1300 SEK and it actually was 530 SEK. </div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Extras</strong></div> <img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/Budget_Picture1-01.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="Picture of Laptop and a monitor on a desk" style="margin:5px" /><span></span><div>If you come from a country with different power outlet connectors, you will definitely need adaptors. I would recommend that you get this new since the electrical and electronics have a limited valid lifetime. I got mine at a store called Clas Ohlson the first day I arrived. I brought a WiFi router from home, so I didn’t spend any money on this, but it is definitely needed here! So plan ahead that too. You may also need some cloth hangers, which sometimes you could find in the free room. If you like to have something special to decorate your apartment, maybe pictures, frames, cute design napkins, you name it. You don't need to rush on buying these the moment you get here. You'll have time to find the perfect item for you, either new, second-hand, or for free. You'd be amazed at all the pretty things you can find here. In my budget I had 200 SEK for extras, but I spent 312. After all the savings, it didn’t hurt to be out of the budget on this one.</div> <div><br /></div> <table class="MsoTable15Plain2" border="1" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="489" style="width:367.05pt;border:none"> <tbody><tr style="height:0.2in"> <td width="255" valign="top" style="width:191.4pt;border-left:none;border-right:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-indent:11pt;line-height:normal"><b><span>Incredible memory foam pillow</span></b></p> </td> <td width="66" valign="top" style="width:49.6pt;border-left:none;border-right:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-align:center;line-height:normal">150<span lang="EN-US"> SEK</span></p> </td> <td width="168" valign="top" style="width:126.05pt;border-left:none;border-right:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-align:center;line-height:normal">New</p> </td> </tr> <tr style="height:0.2in"> <td width="255" valign="top" style="width:191.4pt;border-top:none;border-right:none;border-left:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-indent:11.05pt;line-height:normal"><b><span>Super soft pillow</span></b></p> </td> <td width="66" valign="top" style="width:49.6pt;border-top:none;border-right:none;border-left:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-align:center;line-height:normal">99<span lang="EN-US"> SEK</span></p> </td> <td width="168" valign="top" style="width:126.05pt;border-top:none;border-right:none;border-left:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-align:center;line-height:normal">New</p> </td> </tr> <tr style="height:0.2in"> <td width="255" valign="top" style="width:191.4pt;border:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-indent:11.05pt;line-height:normal"><b><span>Warm duvet</span></b></p> </td> <td width="66" valign="top" style="width:49.6pt;border:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;line-height:normal"><span lang="EN-US">399 SEK</span></p> </td> <td width="168" valign="top" style="width:126.05pt;border:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-align:center;line-height:normal">New</p> </td> </tr> <tr style="height:0.2in"> <td width="255" valign="top" style="width:191.4pt;border-left:none;border-right:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-indent:11.05pt;line-height:normal"><b><span>Covers</span></b></p> </td> <td width="66" valign="top" style="width:49.6pt;border-left:none;border-right:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;line-height:normal"><span lang="EN-US">269 SEK</span></p> </td> <td width="168" valign="top" style="width:126.05pt;border-left:none;border-right:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-align:center;line-height:normal">New</p> </td> </tr> <tr style="height:0.2in"> <td width="255" valign="top" style="width:191.4pt;border:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-indent:11.05pt;line-height:normal"><b><span>Pots and pans</span></b></p> </td> <td width="66" valign="top" style="width:49.6pt;border:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;line-height:normal"><span lang="EN-US">250 SEK</span></p> </td> <td width="168" valign="top" style="width:126.05pt;border:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-align:center;line-height:normal">New</p> </td> </tr> <tr style="height:0.2in"> <td width="255" valign="top" style="width:191.4pt;border-left:none;border-right:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-indent:11.05pt;line-height:normal"><b><span>Spoons</span></b></p> </td> <td width="66" valign="top" style="width:49.6pt;border-left:none;border-right:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;line-height:normal"><span lang="EN-US">15 SEK</span></p> </td> <td width="168" valign="top" style="width:126.05pt;border-left:none;border-right:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-align:center;line-height:normal">New</p> </td> </tr> <tr style="height:0.2in"> <td width="255" valign="top" style="width:191.4pt;border:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-indent:11.05pt;line-height:normal"><b><span>Knives</span></b></p> </td> <td width="66" valign="top" style="width:49.6pt;border:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;line-height:normal"><span lang="EN-US">79 SEK</span></p> </td> <td width="168" valign="top" style="width:126.05pt;border:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-align:center;line-height:normal">New</p> </td> </tr> <tr style="height:0.2in"> <td width="255" valign="top" style="width:191.4pt;border-left:none;border-right:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-indent:11.05pt;line-height:normal"><b><span>Dishes</span></b></p> </td> <td width="66" valign="top" style="width:49.6pt;border-left:none;border-right:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-align:center;line-height:normal">0<span lang="EN-US"> SEK</span></p> </td> <td width="168" valign="top" style="width:126.05pt;border-left:none;border-right:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-align:center;line-height:normal">Second-hand</p> </td> </tr> <tr style="height:0.2in"> <td width="255" valign="top" style="width:191.4pt;border:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-indent:11.05pt;line-height:normal"><b><span>Glasses and cups</span></b></p> </td> <td width="66" valign="top" style="width:49.6pt;border:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-align:center;line-height:normal">0<span lang="EN-US"> SEK</span></p> </td> <td width="168" valign="top" style="width:126.05pt;border:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-align:center;line-height:normal">Second-hand</p> </td> </tr> <tr style="height:0.2in"> <td width="255" valign="top" style="width:191.4pt;border-left:none;border-right:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-indent:11.05pt;line-height:normal"><b><span>French press</span></b></p> </td> <td width="66" valign="top" style="width:49.6pt;border-left:none;border-right:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;line-height:normal"><span lang="EN-US">79 SEK</span></p> </td> <td width="168" valign="top" style="width:126.05pt;border-left:none;border-right:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-align:center;line-height:normal">New</p> </td> </tr> <tr style="height:0.2in"> <td width="255" valign="top" style="width:191.4pt;border:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-indent:11.05pt;line-height:normal"><b><span>Cutlery</span></b></p> </td> <td width="66" valign="top" style="width:49.6pt;border:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;line-height:normal"><span lang="EN-US">30 SEK</span></p> </td> <td width="168" valign="top" style="width:126.05pt;border:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-align:center;line-height:normal">Second-hand</p> </td> </tr> <tr style="height:0.2in"> <td width="255" valign="top" style="width:191.4pt;border-left:none;border-right:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-indent:11.05pt;line-height:normal"><b><span>Shower curtain</span></b></p> </td> <td width="66" valign="top" style="width:49.6pt;border-left:none;border-right:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;line-height:normal">20<span lang="EN-US"> SEK</span></p> </td> <td width="168" valign="top" style="width:126.05pt;border-left:none;border-right:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-align:center;line-height:normal">New</p> </td> </tr> <tr style="height:0.2in"> <td width="255" valign="top" style="width:191.4pt;border:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-indent:11.05pt;line-height:normal"><b><span>Soft towels</span></b></p> </td> <td width="66" valign="top" style="width:49.6pt;border:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;line-height:normal"><span lang="EN-US">139 SEK</span></p> </td> <td width="168" valign="top" style="width:126.05pt;border:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-align:center;line-height:normal">New</p> </td> </tr> <tr style="height:0.2in"> <td width="255" valign="top" style="width:191.4pt;border-left:none;border-right:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-indent:11.05pt;line-height:normal"><b><span>Cabinet</span></b></p> </td> <td width="66" valign="top" style="width:49.6pt;border-left:none;border-right:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;line-height:normal"><span lang="EN-US">150 SEK</span></p> </td> <td width="168" valign="top" style="width:126.05pt;border-left:none;border-right:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-align:center;line-height:normal">Second-hand</p> </td> </tr> <tr style="height:0.2in"> <td width="255" valign="top" style="width:191.4pt;border:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-indent:11.05pt;line-height:normal"><b><span>Home office organizer</span></b></p> </td> <td width="66" valign="top" style="width:49.6pt;border:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;line-height:normal"><span lang="EN-US">30 SEK</span></p> </td> <td width="168" valign="top" style="width:126.05pt;border:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-align:center;line-height:normal">Second-hand</p> </td> </tr> <tr style="height:0.2in"> <td width="255" valign="top" style="width:191.4pt;border-left:none;border-right:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-indent:11.05pt;line-height:normal"><b><span lang="EN-US">Office chair</span></b></p> </td> <td width="66" valign="top" style="width:49.6pt;border-left:none;border-right:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;line-height:normal"><span lang="EN-US">0 SEK</span></p> </td> <td width="168" valign="top" style="width:126.05pt;border-left:none;border-right:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-align:center;line-height:normal">Second-hand</p> </td> </tr> <tr style="height:0.2in"> <td width="255" valign="top" style="width:191.4pt;border:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-indent:11.05pt;line-height:normal"><b><span>Extra 22' monitor</span></b></p> </td> <td width="66" valign="top" style="width:49.6pt;border:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-align:center;line-height:normal">500<span lang="EN-US"> SEK</span></p> </td> <td width="168" valign="top" style="width:126.05pt;border:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-align:center;line-height:normal">Second-hand</p> </td> </tr> <tr style="height:0.2in"> <td width="255" valign="top" style="width:191.4pt;border-left:none;border-right:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-indent:11.05pt;line-height:normal"><b><span>Power outlet adapters</span></b></p> </td> <td width="66" valign="top" style="width:49.6pt;border-left:none;border-right:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-align:center;line-height:normal"><span lang="EN-US">297 SEK</span></p> </td> <td width="168" valign="top" style="width:126.05pt;border-left:none;border-right:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-align:center;line-height:normal">New</p> </td> </tr> <tr style="height:0.2in"> <td width="255" valign="top" style="width:191.4pt;border:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-indent:11.05pt;line-height:normal"><b><span>Cloth hangers</span></b></p> </td> <td width="66" valign="top" style="width:49.6pt;border:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;line-height:normal"><span lang="EN-US">15 SEK</span></p> </td> <td width="168" valign="top" style="width:126.05pt;border:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-align:center;line-height:normal">New</p> </td> </tr> <tr style="height:0.2in"> <td width="255" valign="top" style="width:191.4pt;border-left:none;border-right:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-indent:11.05pt;line-height:normal"><b><span lang="EN-US">TOTAL</span></b></p> </td> <td width="234" colspan="2" valign="top" style="width:175.65pt;border-left:none;border-right:none;padding:0in 5.4pt;height:0.2in"> <p class="MsoNormal" align="center" style="margin-bottom:0in;text-align:center;line-height:normal"><b><span lang="EN-US">2521 SEK</span></b><b></b></p> </td> </tr> </tbody></table> <div><span style="background-color:initial;text-align:center">  </span></div></div> <div> </div> <div style="text-align:center"> </div> <div style="text-align:center"> </div> <div style="text-align:center"> </div> <div style="text-align:center"> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div style="text-align:center"> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div style="text-align:center"> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div style="text-align:center"> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div style="text-align:center"> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div style="text-align:center"> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div style="text-align:center"> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div style="text-align:center"> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div style="text-align:center"> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div style="text-align:center"> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div style="text-align:center"> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div style="text-align:center"> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div style="text-align:center"> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div style="text-align:center"> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div style="text-align:center"> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div style="text-align:center"> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div style="text-align:center"> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div style="text-align:center"> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div style="text-align:center"> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div style="text-align:center"> </div> <div>Here is the average price I spent when buying the things I just mentioned, hope this is of big help to you. Some previous ambassadors also made a blog about <a href="/en/education/studying-at-Chalmers/stuamb/Pages/How-much-does-it-cost-to-live-in-Gothenburg.aspx" title="Link to how much does it cost to live in Gothenburg">how much does it cost to live in Gothenburg</a> and a cool <a href="/en/education/studying-at-Chalmers/stuamb/Pages/A-guide-to-cheap-student-living.aspx" title="Link to cheap living guide">guide to cheap living</a>. Happy decorating!<br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div> </div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/Student%20Ambassadors%20Pictures%20-%20Authors/Nathaly_studentblog.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="Picture of Nathaly" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><br />Author: <a href="https://api.unibuddy.co/og/chalmers-university-of-technology/buddies/students/5fa532ccac6e5303f48e5b5b?buddyPosition=share" title="Link to Nathaly's Unibuddy">Nathaly​</a></div> ​Mon, 17 May 2021 10:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/education/studying-at-Chalmers/stuamb/Pages/Networking-online-at-Chalmers.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/education/studying-at-Chalmers/stuamb/Pages/Networking-online-at-Chalmers.aspxNetworking online at Chalmers<p><b>​Chalmers biggest career fair CHARM went digital this year, but that didn’t stop me from networking! </b></p><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/banner_network.jpg" alt="Picture of CHARM fair catalogue in Sena's hand" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br />​<div><span style="background-color:initial">In my research about Chalmers, I learned that there is a big career fair for students that takes place every year. It is called <a href="https://www.charm.chalmers.se/" title="Link to CHARM website">Chalmers Studentkårs Arbetsmarknadsdagar, CHARM​</a>. Every year, this fair is arranged in February on campus Johanneberg at Chalmers to bring the students closer to the industry.  It is actually one of Scandinavia’s leading career fairs and has been held at Chalmers since 1975. Because of the pandemic, the event was held digitally this year. </span><div><br /><div>Weeks before the virtual fair, the booklets about the fair were put out at campus. These booklets had brief descriptions about the companies that we could meet, which positions they offered to students (summer jobs, internships, full-time jobs) and their contact information. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>Before the virtual fair time came, we were told to enter the CHARM 2021 website and create a user account. We got to fill out our interests, past experiences, and educational information. Thus, company employees could check our profiles and make offers to the candidates they thought were suitable. On the other hand, each company also had its own profile. When you browsed these profiles, you could see what time they were going to make a presentation, and for which positions you could apply to the company for a job. In addition, companies were offering one-on-one online meetings with some of their employees by making an appointment in advance to have more efficient interviews. You could also message them on this platform.</div> <div>After creating my own account, I started to like the companies I was interested in. With my background in Applied Mechanics, I was looking for summer jobs or internships in structural designs or analysis of vehicles like aircraft, seacrafts and automobiles. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>The companies had pages similar to those on Facebook, Instagram, and Linkedin. Afterward, I planned which presentations and one-on-one online meetings I could attend. I have noted the positions I could apply for. It surprised me that some of the job postings that I had not seen on the websites of companies were only published on this platform. One of the best things about the fair was that a project leader contacted me by messaging me directly on the platform. They said that my profile matched their positions to a great extent and asked if I wanted to meet with them. After that, I reviewed the postings which was an internship in my field, solid and fluid mechanics analysis and computations, and applied for the position they were offering. I also thought that if I would do this internship, then I can see the problems or methods in the industrial applications that could be helpful to me to determine my thesis topic next year. Keep your fingers crossed for me!</div> <div><br /></div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/photo_network.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="Picture of Sena while writing in her personal notebook" style="margin:5px" />Being able to get together with leading companies in their field, asking their employees about their experiences, and getting to know the company better was one of the best investments I made myself in the time of COVID (after learning how to bake bread at home). On the other hand, many parts of the world are having difficulty finding jobs due to the pandemic has raised questions in my mind for a while. During my meetings with companies at CHARM, I was able to ask them these questions. How did they work in pandemic time (they mostly worked remotely and followed pandemic regulations and restrictions), will there anything to change in their companies for the time for the new normal life (some companies realized that working remotely was more efficient and were considering switching to this practice some days of the week after the pandemic). </div> <div><br /></div> <div>In its 46-year history, CHARM was hosted digitally for the first time this year due to the pandemic. Admittedly, I was initially concerned about how this would happen and whether it would be fruitful for me. As a matter of fact, I have seen that the process is managed very smartly, even if it was conducted online. And I am already looking forward to what opportunities we will see at CHARM next year. </div></div></div> <div><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/Student%20Ambassadors%20Pictures%20-%20Authors/Sena_studentblog.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="Picture of Sena" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><br />Author: <a href="https://api.unibuddy.co/og/chalmers-university-of-technology/buddies/students/5fa71e8f728dc41b0ff73012?buddyPosition=share" title="Link to Sena Unibuddy">Sena</a></div>Mon, 10 May 2021 10:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/education/studying-at-Chalmers/stuamb/Pages/Surviving-the-first-month-in-Gothenburg-without-Bank-Account.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/education/studying-at-Chalmers/stuamb/Pages/Surviving-the-first-month-in-Gothenburg-without-Bank-Account.aspxSurviving the first month in Gothenburg without Bank Account<p><b>​Wondering how you can survive a cashless society like Sweden only with cash? Good News! Cash is not completely outdated yet.​</b></p><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/Banner-Cashless.jpg" alt="Picture of a paper bag and banking cards in Mohsen's hand" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><span style="background-color:initial">You all have heard about Sweden being a cashless society, right? But let me tell you, it is not 100% cashless, you can still use cash here. Due to international sanctions, we as Iranian don’t have access to international banking systems. It means I did not have access to Master Card or any other international payment systems when I arrived here from Iran. therefore, I had to spend my first month just by using cash until I could open a bank account in Sweden. </span><div><br /><div>When I first got here as a master’s student in Architecture and Urban Design at Chalmers, I only had Euro and Dollar with me and I had to exchange my money for Swedish Kronor (SEK) to be able to buy stuff. The majority of stores and businesses here do not accept Euro, even though Sweden is part of the EU, it has its own currency. Therefore, I exchanged part of my money at the airport. For this purpose, usually, the only option is FOREX bank branches.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Once I arrived at my student apartment in Gothenburg, I realized that it is going to be harder than I thought without an international bank card or SEK. I needed to buy groceries, dishes, cooking appliances, etc. But none of these options were available to me on the first night. Hopefully, I had a friend who was also an Iranian student here, who helped me to order food from Foodora, it is good if you find a friend or someone who is willing to help you before coming to Sweden since it is the most straightforward way of getting useful information. The following day, I did some research on the internet and I was able to find many places that accepted cash, but how could I reach those places if I could not buy a bus ticket? </div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Transportation</strong></div> <div>Well, I would say this is one of the few places that you have to either use your foreign bank to buy a ticket or if you are like me, you should take a walk to the central station, which is a beautiful place in the heart of Gothenburg, and it does not take more than 30-45 minutes to walk from the city center. Once you arrive there, you can buy a physical ticket for different periods of time depending on your preferences. There is also a student discount which requires you to have your student ID, but probably, you will not have it in the beginning, so It will be wise if you choose a ticket for a shorter period and once you get your Student ID you can buy a ticket for a longer period of time with a student discount. Once you got your ticket then congratulations! Now can go anywhere in the city that you want with one of the best public transportation systems in the world! The ticket will be valid for the trams, busses and ferries in Gothenburg.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Food</strong></div> <div>One of the best supermarket options which are also close to Chalmers and also have many branches around the city are “Willys” chain stores. They accept cash and they are also a cheap option for the most basic stuff you will need at your home. Another option is ICA, which is of course more expensive but also has more options. ICA is usually closer to the city centers, so if your house is a bit far from the city center, it might be easier to get your stuff from Willys! There are a couple of other options as well, like Coop and LIDL. All these stores accept both cash and cards. Some of these stores also support self-checkout which unfortunately does not support cash, but once you get your bank account, you can use them! Otherwise, you should always go to the cashier who accepts cash.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Dishes &amp; Furniture</strong></div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/cashless-picture.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="Picture of IKEA store from outside with a few cars in the background" style="margin:5px" />Do you have any doubt? IKEA. The good news is that IKEA branches also accept cash if you buy the items in person. There are currently two IKEA stores in Gothenburg, one in the north and one in the south of the city – Bäckebol and Kållered. You have to allocate time to visit here, since it is not in the city center, and it takes time to go there. But the good news is that you can take the bus! There are also secondhand shops around the city that you can buy stuff for a cheaper price, like Myrorna. Most of them also accept cash, but there are a few that only accept cards. You have to do some research before heading to one of these shops.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Electrical / Mechanical Accessories </strong></div> <div>I would suggest Biltema for this purpose, you can find most electrical things here for a cheap price, it also has a wide range of accessories for any type of vehicle. Almost anything can be found here, and it is way cheaper than any other place I have been to. They also accept cash if you buy the items in person, it is also located near IKEA, so you can visit both places on the same day!</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Facebook Groups (Recommended!)</strong></div> <div>For the final part, I want to remind you that you look for second-hand selling Facebook groups. If you live in one of the student housing areas, try to look for the one that is created specifically for your building! There are usually students that are leaving and sometimes giving away their stuff for a cheap price or even for free! You just need a sharp eye to find what you want. Also, since it is located in your area, you can easily give them cash without using your bank card.</div></div> <div><br /></div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/Student%20Ambassadors%20Pictures%20-%20Authors/Mohsen_studentblog.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="Picture of Mohsen" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><br />Author: <a href="https://api.unibuddy.co/og/chalmers-university-of-technology/buddies/students/5fa56d33bdd3773cfb4a1720?buddyPosition=share" title="Link to Mohsen's Unibuddy">Mohsen</a></div>Mon, 03 May 2021 10:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/education/studying-at-Chalmers/stuamb/Pages/Labs-during-the-pandemic,-part-2.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/education/studying-at-Chalmers/stuamb/Pages/Labs-during-the-pandemic,-part-2.aspxLabs during the pandemic, part 2<p><b>​This is how professors at Chalmers prepare hands-on lab experiments and other projects despite the pandemic.</b></p><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/Banner_Lab2-01.jpg" alt="Picture of the equipment for each group in the lab" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><div><span style="background-color:initial"><a href="/en/education/studying-at-Chalmers/stuamb/Pages/Lab-work-during-the-pandemic.aspx" target="_blank" title="Link to previous blog">In my previous blog​</a>, I wrote about how I experienced lab work during the pandemic. Now it’s time to describe it from a professors’ point of view. In my experience, all of the professors’ work is reflected on every assignment and experiment we have performed at Chalmers so far. </span><div><br /><div>I met Elio Venero last year when some of the 2019 SI scholarship holders, at Gothenburg, arranged a meeting with us scholars of 2020. I got the idea to share another point of view from him, as a second-year student in the master’s programme Interaction design and technologies. He is currently a teaching assistant in the course Tangible interactions. He was telling me about the hard work they put in to prepare classes for future students. I was amazed about all the preparation he mentioned that I asked to have a more in-depth conversation about it with the lab coordinator, Farshid Harandi, he provides teaching services to Chalmers with his independent company since 2009. He fulfilled his master’s programme in Intelligent Systems Design at Chalmers and now is a teacher in the Tangible Interactions course every year.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>You may wonder “What is tangible interaction?”, so did I! And the way I understand it, it is everything that can be felt, visualized, or even smelled. In this course, students present innovative, digital ideas for the final users of everyday items. Imagine you have a regular answering machine and every time you get a recorded message you need to press a button to hear it. How boring! Now imagine the machine would represent every recorded message with a marble piece that you can put into the answering machine to hear its message. It would be like holding the recording with your hand and making it tangible. How cool is that? But that was just an example, because perhaps in this course, the sky is the limit? The course consists of lab experiments and a collaborative project to build a prototype and construct a mockup. </div> <div><br /></div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/Picture_Lab2-01.jpg" alt="Picture of Nathaly's laptop and some tools in the lab" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" style="background-color:initial;margin:5px" />As you can imagine, this is a very hands-on kind of course. That got the coordinators (Morten Fjeld and<br />Farshid Harandi) and TA’s (Sjoerd Henricus and Elio Venero) to think about possible solutions when they realized that the pandemic's consequences would affect the standard way to conduct the class. They figured out that the best way to do it was by structuring take-home kits with all the elements a student would need when developing an electronics project (with a bit of crafting, of course). The professors at Chalmers put together the components, development boards and pre-soldered all of the parts to make it plug and play. They also made sure the kit contained a double amount of elements in case something happend (if someone was like that Harry Potter kid that blows stuff up). Since they weren’t allowed to meet with the students due to the pandemic to supervise their assignments, they included an additional web camera to show the workbench of students so the TA’s could have a better view of students circuits and observe results or provide better assistance when necessary.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>In total, there were eight groups, each of them delivering one final project plus the small lab experiments. I asked about their results, and Farshid was happy to say that all the circuit implementations on every assignment worked properly. Given that students were not in the usual environment and that the TA’s had it very difficult to detect failures and help to fix them without being in the same room. This doesn’t mean that there was nothing to improve, on the contrary, this first experience helped determine all the things that could be done better if they should do it again.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Here are some of the pros they discovered</div> <div><br /></div> <div><ul><li>They could easier find and book time slots for supervision sessions since there wasn’t a need for either of them to take themselves to university. Assistance could be provided and received from any location.</li> <li>They practiced collaboration on distance and built their electronics projects, did some crafting, and developed their skills in delivering prototypes, despite the remote-learning education from January to March.</li></ul></div> <div><br /></div> <div>By the end of my conversation with Farshid, some things were clear to me. The coordinators' and TA’s preparation was challenging but with a lot of enthusiasm they made it work in the end. This was done for us, the students, to make the best out of the course so that we didn’t miss important lab experiences. I truly appreciate the effort they put in to face these difficulties and that they were brave enough to think outside of the box.</div> <div><br /></div> <span style="background-color:initial"><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/Student%20Ambassadors%20Pictures%20-%20Authors/Nathaly_studentblog.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="Picture of Nathaly" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">Author: <a href="https://api.unibuddy.co/og/chalmers-university-of-technology/buddies/students/5fa532ccac6e5303f48e5b5b?buddyPosition=share" title="Link to Nathaly's Unibuddy">Nathaly</a></span></div></div>Mon, 26 Apr 2021 09:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/education/studying-at-Chalmers/stuamb/Pages/Studying-in-Gothenburg-as-a-family.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/education/studying-at-Chalmers/stuamb/Pages/Studying-in-Gothenburg-as-a-family.aspxStudying in Gothenburg as a family<p><b>​Do you wonder if having a family can be a limiting factor in studying at Chalmers? In this article, we interviewed an international family who chose to pursue their master's in Gothenburg.</b></p><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/FamilySweden-Banner,-Size-690px-x-340px.png" alt="Picture of Alberto, Citlalli and their daughter Isabella in the city center." style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><div><span style="background-color:initial">This is the story of Alberto, 35 (master's in Production engineering at Chalmers), Citlalli, 33 (master's in Communication, Gothenburg University), and their daughter Isabella, 3. Alberto was born in Toluca (Mexico); he met Citlalli in her natal Monterrey (Mexico) in 2009 when he moved there to study his first master's degree in automation. Ever since they got married in 2014, they started talking about moving abroad. Alberto was very interested in pursuing his dream to work in virtual commissioning and simulation of processes, and he found Chalmers as a great opportunity. That's how they started planning their next adventure.</span><div><br /><div><strong>What has it been like combining your studies with having a child?</strong></div> <div><strong><br /></strong></div> <div><strong>Citlalli:</strong> As a mom, I think the most challenging thing is dividing my attention. I'm in lectures when Isabella is in school, and in the afternoon when she comes back from school, I want to be with her. This means that I wait for her to go to bed to do my homework and study, which can be pretty hard as I'm tired by then. If you already know how to work late, it should be easy, especially because she goes to bed early.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Alberto:</strong> Isabella is in school during the day, which is when Citlalli has lectures. As I'm already working on my thesis, I don't have scheduled lectures anymore. Still, I remember team meetings were complicated (they both laugh) as Isabella would be very noisy when she played.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Citlalli:</strong> I think the difficult part is not having a space designed to study. This has been even more difficult since the pandemic started because both of us had to study from home. Whenever Alberto had a team meeting, I had to be with Isabella, but she obviously wanted to play when it should be quiet. Her school schedule is very flexible, which has made it easier for us to organize if both of us are busy. The number of hours that the daycare will look after her can be easily planned with a few weeks of notice.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Alberto:</strong> Thankfully, it was just one semester when we had to go through this. Now that I have more flexibility, if Citlalli can't pick her up or needs to go to school, I can work from home and adapt to the situation. Regardless, we have had a lot of flexibility here: there are not many restrictions in Sweden, which has played in our favor. It has been complicated but compared to others' situation, we haven't had to struggle as much because daycare is still open and running here, unlike in other countries due to the pandemic. </div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Citlalli:</strong> I ran out of ideas to keep her entertained! (laughs) After a couple of days, I didn't know what to do next. Sometimes she can be quiet for 5 minutes, but then she has to go back to playing.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>On the flip side, what have been the benefits of being here together as a family?</strong></div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Alberto:</strong> A lot of things, I think. Sweden is a wonderful country.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Citlalli:</strong> There have been many good things. Everything about Isabella's education is excellent. Although we don't have every benefit that the Swedish citizens have, we still get many of them. She gets called up for revisions every 6 months to inquire about her language skills, socializing, etc. as soon as she turned 3, she started going to the dentist for free. All of this is entirely new for us, and she hasn't been sick as frequently as she was back home. In those cases, we had to pay for a private doctor and her medicines, which is entirely different over here where it's tax reduced. Also, we always have a sense of safety here. We were shocked when we saw children riding the bus to school by themselves!</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Alberto:</strong> Sweden is one of the best countries to live in as a woman or child. Here, you can just walk a few meters, and you'll find a park where a kid can play, and they're given a lot of attention from the government. Additionally, we used to live in a big city where the air was very polluted. When we came here, even breathing was different. I used to get sick at least twice a year (perhaps because of the pollution), and I haven't been ill once here. We have been treated well, and we haven't experienced any kind of rejection. We also get to come home to family, which has also been great during the pandemic. </div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>How do you manage your finances?</strong></div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Alberto: </strong>I have been working for a while, so we have savings. We have also requested some loans, and we have the support of our parents and siblings. We also try to save a lot of money by buying our groceries in markets instead of big stores, where prices can be high. We also avoid eating in restaurants. At the same time, it's easy because we don't have as much opportunity to go out now that Isabella is here with us. I also made sure to get credit cards from Mexico that have lots of promotions abroad, which helps us. I'm mostly done with my degree, so I hope to find a job soon. In Sweden, it's common to have recycling rooms where people leave the things they don't need anymore and find others they can use. I think that's an excellent way to stock up on items without having to spend any money. </div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>What would you say has been the most significant adjustment you've had to go through now that you live in Sweden?</strong></div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Citlalli: </strong>With or without the pandemic? (laughs). Being away from my family as I had never been away for so long.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Alberto: </strong>It was a bit easier for me, as I already lived far away from my family before coming to Sweden. </div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Citlalli:</strong> I was concerned about where Isabella was going to attend school. Kids can adapt very quickly, but moms are always worried. Especially about the language, how she was going to make friends. Fortunately, the process went very well for us with the school, the teachers, etc. So, in the end, the obstacle wasn't very much the school, but the worries that came with it. There was a slight miscommunication issue once; most teachers speak English, but there was a meeting I wasn't able to attend because they didn't have a translator. Still, they sent over a letter in Swedish with what they talked about, which I could translate using Google Translate (laughs).</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Can you tell me a bit more about Isabella's school?</strong></div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Citlalli:</strong> I'm sure that all parents who come here with their kids think a lot about that. I'm pleased with her school because the schools here are great. She's super happy; she loves her school. Back then, she cried before going to school; now, she cries because we pick her up from school (laughs). </div> <div>There are several options in schools depending on orientation (some focus on music, others in maths, etc.). Montessori schools are obviously the ones that are the most in-demand. Still, we were really looking for whatever came first. There are both communal and private schools, and the applying process is different between both kinds of schools. We chose to focus on finding a communal (or public) school and on the government webpage. We were pretty lucky because we found a school within walking distance of where we're living, and as it is a new school, there was plenty of vacancies.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>How about tuition for Isabella's school?</strong></div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Alberto:</strong> It's completely different here. Tuitions are calculated off your salary, and as we are both master's students, we actually don't have to pay for her school. At first, we were paying a monthly fee because we didn't know better, and we were reimbursed when we clarified that we were students.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>What are you planning to do once you both finish your degrees?</strong></div> <div><b><br /></b></div> <div><b>Citlalli:</b> Right now, many things could change, so we don't have a clear answer. It depends on how our job situation looks like a year from now.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Alberto:</strong> What I'm specializing in is significantly developed in Sweden. The project I'm working on for my thesis is exactly what I came here for. Setting education aside (as I already had a Master's degree and experience), I like that I'm becoming proficient in the exact topic I was interested in. Studying at Chalmers has brought me closer to the employment opportunities I was looking for.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Would you like to add anything else to the parents who are thinking of coming to Sweden to study their masters?</strong></div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Citlalli:</strong> I would say that it's worth it. I know people who are still back home while they wait for remote education to be over but being here early gave us a longer period of adjustment. It's better to be here as soon as possible because you don't have to worry about too many things when you start doing schoolwork.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Alberto:</strong> It's also helpful to start socializing and getting to know people here. Coming here, we met a group of people from Mexico who, like me, dance Mexican folkloric ballet. With them, we had weekend plans, they taught us about the culture in Sweden as a lot of them have been here for years already, and it was an excellent start to our adaptation here.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Citlalli: </strong>I would have also liked to have started learning Swedish before coming here. Additionally, being here has many opportunities like the many conversational clubs with all fluidity levels that give you the confidence to start learning. I think sometimes we try to postpone the change instead of facing it head-on. I think it's good to get out of your comfort zone as long as you have the opportunity.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Alberto:</strong> At first, I felt very lazy to start learning Swedish, but once you're here, it's necessary. Sure, you can get along in English, but Swedish helps you integrate into the Swedish culture and understand what you learn riding the bus and what the road signs mean. I also like that there are many opportunities to study.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Citlalli:</strong> For example, in SFI (Swedish for Immigrants). It is a free Swedish course that you can take. When you<img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/FamilySweden-Picture,-Size-350px-x-305px-updated.png" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="Picture of the Citlalli and Alberto and their daughter together in front of a wall." style="margin:5px" /><br />graduate, you're able to start doing &quot;community service&quot; in jobs where you're not paid, but you're starting to be integrated into a community where you can develop your use of the language better, as well as an ability. I also think that it's excellent that Isabella has the opportunity to speak learn languages from a young age. </div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Alberto: </strong>I'd like to add that families have tons of flexibility. Assistance to lectures is seldom mandatory, and as a parent, you're granted more flexibility to turn in homework and for exams. When there are compulsory lectures, you can switch the date or time if your kid has health problems or other family-related issues.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Isabella:</strong> In our house, we speak Spanish, in school, we speak Swedish and my friends speak Persian. </div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Author's note:</strong></div> <div>The accommodation needs are as unique as every family is, which is why we recommend you look for the information that the Gothenburg Municipality provides. In the links below you will find more information about accommodation. </div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Link:</strong> <a href="/en/education/living-in-gothenburg/Pages/accommodation.aspx" title="Link to Chalmers accommodation page">https://www.chalmers.se/en/education/living-in-gothenburg/Pages/accommodation.aspx</a><br /><strong>Link:</strong><a href="/en/education/before-your-arrival/Pages/coming-with-family.aspx"> https://www.chalmers.se/en/education/before-your-arrival/Pages/coming-with-family.aspx</a></div> <span style="background-color:initial"><strong>Link:</strong> <a href="https://www.movetogothenburg.com/moving/find-home" target="_blank" title="Link to Movetogothenburg Website">https://www.movetogothenburg.com/moving/find-home</a></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/Student%20Ambassadors%20Pictures%20-%20Authors/Abril_studentblog.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="Picture of Abril" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">Author: <a href="https://api.unibuddy.co/og/chalmers-university-of-technology/buddies/students/5fcf4e54ffd52f015226e403?buddyPosition=share" title="Link to Abril's Unibuddy">Abril</a></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div></div> ​Mon, 19 Apr 2021 10:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/education/studying-at-Chalmers/stuamb/Pages/Can-I-handle-the-study-pressure-at-Chalmers.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/education/studying-at-Chalmers/stuamb/Pages/Can-I-handle-the-study-pressure-at-Chalmers.aspxCan I handle the study pressure at Chalmers?<p><b>​As you finally allow yourself to look forward to the adventure ahead, you may also experience a tiny bud of apprehension – will you be able to make it? </b></p><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/Academic_Pressure_Banner.jpeg" alt="Picture of Teanette's laptop,book,etc together." style="background-color:initial;margin:5px;width:690px;height:313px" /><div><br />S<span style="background-color:initial">o you’ve been admitted to Chalmers University of Technology – congratulations!! For many of us (myself included!) this was a dream come true. However, coming to Chalmers, my biggest fear was that my South African bachelor’s degree would not measure up to the Swedish education standard. I was worried that my knowledge would not be sufficient for me to pass the courses that I had signed up for. Or worse: that I would have to spend all my time working to keep up and pass the course, missing out on all the other experiences that make being an international student worthwhile. Many of my previous teachers and professors had warned me that pursuing a master’s degree in Europe would be challenging and not for the faint-hearted, and those words haunted me in the months before my departure to Sweden. The fact that my previous university did not have a high ranking, particularly when compared to Chalmers, did nothing to alleviate my worries. </span></div> <div><br /><div>In that time, I held onto one piece of advice which meant a lot to me: upon choosing the students for his study group, my South African study leader had said that a career in academia is not about intelligence, but rather about curiosity and courage. I had always been curious, and by pursuing this degree in Sweden, I hoped I was being courageous. Nevertheless, I prepared myself for a time in which my resolve would be put to the test.</div> <div>However, eight months later as I near the end of my first academic year at Chalmers, I am pleased to say that I was completely unprepared for what awaited me – and that was a very good thing! The education system and work culture at Chalmers was wildly different to anything I had experienced before. Each study period consists of eight weeks of class in which a student needs to earn 15 Credits (typically two courses are sufficient for this). The limited number of courses per study period gives students the freedom to really deep-dive into the subject matter. At my previous university it was typical to juggle five to six courses at a time – not great for a productive workflow, as you inevitably end up skipping from one subject to the other based on which deadline is coming up next. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>Even the approach towards academic achievement at Chalmers was completely new to me. Great emphasis is placed on learning, participation and understanding rather than on performing. Although the deadlines for assignment submissions were strict, we always had the opportunity to resubmit work that was improved based on comments from the lecturers or teaching assistants. As long as the original report was submitted timeously, these resubmissions could take place even after the set deadline. Having grown up in a system where you had one chance to submit and one chance only (often with the success of the entire course hanging in the balance) this was a breath of fresh air! It felt like Chalmers lecturers were allowing us to make mistakes while on the road to understanding, instead of expecting us to already know everything on our first try. Their classes were filled with pauses where students were encouraged to think, speak up, share and question. Complex problems were tackled as a group, where we often came up with a creative solution that even the lecturer had not considered. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>A similar approach is followed in the exams - I remember the first time I read on the front page of an assessment that “constructive, creative and valuable approaches are also rewarded”. In other words, even if you present a solution that is different from the one that the lecturer had in mind, you could still earn marks for it. Whatever effort and work you put into your education will be matched by the lecturers and teaching assistants around you. They will go the extra mile to understand your solution and approach, consider its validity, and then comment and guide you if necessary. Never once in my time here have I felt overwhelmed by the amount of work or the difficulty of a problem, because I know that help is only a Zoom call away.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Chalmers provided me with the opportunity to overcome my “Imposter Syndrome” and instead reach a space where I allowed myself to explore and make mistakes. Without the constant pressure of performing, I found I was learning more, working faster, and ultimately achieving better marks than ever before. I have seen the truth of my supervisor’s words in action – if a student is curious enough to learn and brave enough to ask, they will find success at Chalmers. </div></div> <div><br /></div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/Student%20Ambassadors%20Pictures%20-%20Authors/Teanette_studentblog.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="Picture of Teanette" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><br /></div> Author: <a href="https://api.unibuddy.co/og/chalmers-university-of-technology/buddies/students/5fb6991683fa8003cd884638?buddyPosition=share" title="Link to Teanette's Unibuddy">Teanette</a><br /><br />Mon, 12 Apr 2021 10:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/education/studying-at-Chalmers/stuamb/Pages/Call-me-by-my-first-name.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/education/studying-at-Chalmers/stuamb/Pages/Call-me-by-my-first-name.aspxCall me by my first name<p><b>​It has been exciting to see how the communication flows between students and lecturers here at Chalmers.</b></p><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/Banner_First_Name-01.jpg" alt="The programme director of Applied Mechanics and some of his first-year students on a hike while maintaining social distance." style="margin:5px" /><br /><strong><em>Photo:</em></strong><em> The programme director of Applied Mechanics and some of his first-year students on a hike while maintaining social distance.</em><br /><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span><div><span style="background-color:initial">Calling our lecturers, examiners, teaching assistants and coordinators, by their first name is normal here in Sweden. Even Chalmers’ president and CEO, Stefan Bengtsson, told us in his speech that when we see him on campus, we can call him Stefan. Back in our home countries, Turkey and Ecuador, you use titles to show respect. At Chalmers, we can show the same kind of respect without the formal language. </span><div><br /></div> <div><br /><div><strong>Sena’s experience:</strong></div> <div><strong><br /></strong></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">I</span><span style="background-color:initial"> felt a combination of worry and sadness starting a new chapter in my life with remote education due to the pandemic. Then I started to feel happiness after the presentation of the Applied Mechanics master’s programme director. In an informal way, he first talked about life in Gothenburg, like climate conditions and the beautiful nature here. He then mentioned that Gothenburg has very good football teams and advised us to go outside a lot when the weather was good. After that part, he gave us information about the programme. I especially liked the fact that he put the images of football teams since I am very interested in sports. Before coming to Chalmers, I’ve researched and contacted the sports teams that I could join. The fact that our lecturer also seemed interested in such social activities was an indicator, for me, that he would also encourage us to participate in social activities.</span><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div>I must admit that I struggled a bit during my first weeks at Chalmers because I didn’t know anyone from my department that I could brainstorm with. At the end of each study period, I mentioned this in the surveys that was sent to us students to evaluate the lecturers and the courses. After that, our lecturers encouraged us to have more dialogues in our online classes. Some fika sessions were organized through Zoom or break-out rooms. Those were created to discuss the lectures’ topics in small groups. Feedback is very important in the Swedish culture, and this is just one example of how your feedback can make a difference.</div> <div>With the start of spring, many companies have started to announce various summer-jobs and internship programmes for students. Our programme director has been kind of enough to create a group for us on LinkedIn where he shares interesting job positions that we can apply to. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>This was very helpful because no matter how much I researched, I could overlook some non-English postings because I didn’t know Swedish that well. He also organized a hiking activity and announced it on that platform. It was an event in which we could all get together physically while maintaining social distance due to the pandemic.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><strong>Na</strong></span><span style="background-color:initial"><strong>thaly’s</strong></span><span style="background-color:initial"><strong> experience:</strong></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><strong><br /></strong></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">At Chalmers, they put a lot of effort into incorporating feedback from the students. That’s why every time a course starts, they randomly chose a group of people to be “Student’s representatives.” This group is meant to be the bridge between students and professors. Even though we all can reach the TA’s and professors, some students prefer to handle some topics anonymously. So, they can always get in touch with the student’s representatives.</span><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div>I got to be a student representative in one of my courses in the Biomedical Engineering programme. Generally, the examiners check in with us about the course's pace, the academic load of the assignments, the lab or exercise sessions, and other similar topics. It was a pleasant experience for me to give this kind of feedback to them and realize that they do their best to find a solution when something is not working as expected. For example, in my Model Predictive Control course, we agreed that we would appreciate it if there were more consultation hours with the TA’s for the assignments to have better results. The week after that, we received a message with the new scheduled hours for this consultation. How great is that?</div> <div><br /></div> <div>I also had the chance to contact the lecturer, of Image Analysis, on one occasion when I felt a little lost on a topic. He immediately answered that he would repeat the subject in the next class. We started that lecture on Deep Learning, making a review of the neural network that I asked my question about. The lecturers are so quick on their feet with the feedback they receive from us students! That’s why I think that you can still manage to get the best out of the class, even during online studies.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>In my class Medicine for Engineers, where different medical doctors are responsible for the lectures based on their specializations we got to ask medical-related questions. Perhaps something weird happened to you once, and you never figured out the medical reason behind it. The cool thing was that they gave their expert opinion and analysis based on our questions, which got me more excited about studying Biomedical Engineering. It was a fantastic opportunity to be so virtually close to them and have this smooth type of communication. I’ve always said that your professional title doesn’t define you as a person, and Chalmers has proven that to me.</div> <br /></div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/Student%20Ambassadors%20Pictures%20-%20Authors/Nathaly_studentblog.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="Picture of Nathaly" style="margin:5px" /><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/Student%20Ambassadors%20Pictures%20-%20Authors/Sena_studentblog.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="Picture of Sena" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><br />Authors: <a href="https://api.unibuddy.co/og/chalmers-university-of-technology/buddies/students/5fa532ccac6e5303f48e5b5b?buddyPosition=share" title="Link to Nathaly's Unibuddy">Nathaly </a>&amp; <a href="https://api.unibuddy.co/og/chalmers-university-of-technology/buddies/students/5fa71e8f728dc41b0ff73012?buddyPosition=share" title="Link to Sena's Unibuddy">Sena</a><br /><br /><br /></div> ​</div>Tue, 06 Apr 2021 13:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/education/studying-at-Chalmers/stuamb/Pages/Pursuing-a-part-time-job-while-studying-at-Chalmers.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/education/studying-at-Chalmers/stuamb/Pages/Pursuing-a-part-time-job-while-studying-at-Chalmers.aspxPursuing a part-time job while studying at Chalmers<p><b>​Three international students at Chalmers share how they manage their work-study balance at Chalmers.</b></p><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/parttime-banner.jpg" alt="Three ambassadors holding the phone with logos of the companies they work for in their hand" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><span style="background-color:initial">We were surprised to learn that all international students that qualify for a Swedish residence permit are also allowed to work in Sweden - with no restrictions on the amount of hours they work! It certainly opened up new doors and hopes in our minds, but also a lot of questions: Am I qualified enough to work in Sweden? What job opportunities are available at Chalmers? How will a part-time job affect my studies? Will my lack of proficiency in Swedish be an obstacle? To answer these questions, we are going to share our experience of having a part-time job while studying at Chalmers. </span><div><br /><div>Teanette discusses her experience in a technical job that is affiliated with the Chalmers housing, Nathaly shares how her tutoring job helps her to give back to the community, and Mohsen explores the flexibility and independence of a food-delivery job. </div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Ambassador: </strong>Teanette</div> <div><strong> Programme: </strong>Wireless, Photonics and Space Engineering</div> <div><strong> Job:</strong> Software Development at Brainmill</div> <div><br /></div> <div>I started working as a software developer during my second study period at Chalmers. My company is in charge of managing the internet connection to Chalmers student housing. I was lucky to find the job advertisement on the day I moved into my apartment – it was the first thing I saw on the noticeboard as I entered my building! The employees are made up chiefly of Chalmers students, both to create a space for students to start their careers and to have employees who are personally aware of the connectivity needs and challenges of our clients. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>I saw the job advertisement for this job on the day that I moved into my apartment. Applying for this job was a huge leap of faith for me – software development was not a job I had been trained for, and diverged significantly from my skillset as a Wireless, Photonics and Space Engineering student. However, I was surprised to find that many of the skills I had learnt during my time at Chalmers actually translate very well to my job. For example: our lectures deal extensively with making decisions based on engineering trade-offs between manufacturing time, performance, and the robustness of the final design. Many of my software development projects require the same type of decision-making skills. Furthermore, I was surprised in how much my job has helped me perform academically. In growing my confidence as a programmer, I have started to automate large parts of my engineering design process. In fact, I am in the process of designing my own personal Microwave Engineering design library – something I would never have pursued with my previous programming skill. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>However, my job has been more than an opportunity to hone my technical competence – it has become my looking-glass into Swedish society. Like many other students, I was cautious about entering the Swedish job market, partly because of my lack of proficiency in the Swedish language and partly because of my lack of experience in Swedish society. I was surprised by how accommodating the Swedish working culture is. My manager believes that the best performing employees are happy employees, and it really shows in the way he interacts with us. The company is focused on creating an atmosphere where people are comfortable enough to grow, learn, collaborate and speak up when they do not know something. Not only is this conducive to good work practices, but it also creates a platform for people to get to know each other without judgement. My work colleagues are some of the only Swedish people I have had the opportunity to build relationships with during the pandemic. </div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Ambassador:</strong> Nathaly</div> <div><strong> Programme</strong>: Biomedical Engineering</div> <div><strong> Job:</strong> Tutor at Pluggstöd</div> <div><br /></div> <div>I used to work as an Electronics Instructor back in Ecuador, after finishing my undergraduate degree in Electrical and Electronic Engineering. The reason I applied to teaching positions is because of how passionate I am about giving back what I’ve learnt in my life. When I saw the tutoring position advertised on a banner outside of the Student Union building at Johanneberg campus, I was curious and immediately interested.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>The work as a tutor consists of going to different middle-schools in Gothenburg that are associated with Pluggstöd after their regular class schedules or even before a sports practice. Once there, we offer our help with math and other STEM related courses. If they feel like they need someone to explain things one more time or to clarify some of their doubts, the tutors are there to help them. So far, I have had the opportunity to explain some math and biology, because those are the things that I’m familiar with as a Biomedical engineering student. One time I also got to help someone with their Spanish assignment. That was a very exciting experience for me since I felt like we were helping each other instead of just me helping them. I got to practice more Swedish words and they got to learn new Spanish words from a native speaker - this is what I consider a win-win situation!</div> <div><br /></div> <div>You may be wondering if you need to be fluent in Swedish in order to perform in this job. Each job is different, but from what I’ve seen on LinkedIn, many companies have a phrase in common: ”fluent in English is mandatory, fluent in Swedish is preferred.”. I am not even on a intermediate level in Swedish, but I have a strong dedication and determination to improve my skills. I can help the students by communicating in English but, Google translate in Swedish certainly helps as well. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>And I would certainly add that, thanks to Pluggstöd, I’ve met wonderful people too! So if you are looking for something to work on while studying at Chalmers, I would definitely recommend this!</div> <div> </div> <div><strong>Ambassador:</strong> Mohsen</div> <div> <strong>Programme: </strong>Architecture &amp; Urban Design</div> <div><strong> Job:</strong> Foodora rider</div> <div><br /></div> <div>As an Architecture student, it is quite common to suddenly become busy quickly. Therefore I was looking for a<img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/parttime-picture.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="Picture of Foodora bag on a scooter" style="margin:5px;width:350px;height:305px" /><br />part-time flexible job where I can choose how and when I want to work. Fortunately, Foodora had just such a system. The company is basically a platform for food delivery where your role is to collect the food from restaurants and transport it to the customers. That’s all - nothing complicated! All I needed was a scooter and a phone. I found this job through an advertisement on Instagram, most of these platform companies usually advertise available jobs through social medias.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>I enjoyed the job because it gave me a good opportunity to explore the city, the restaurants, and the different neighbourhoods around Chalmers. However, the most important thing for me was the fact that there was no need to be fluent in Swedish at all. This meant that I could start working soon after I arrived in Gothenburg, and could immediately start earning a salary to help me with expenses. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>The biggest benefit of being a rider is that you basically work for yourself: you enter your available work times on the application and get shifts for each week accordingly. You can swop shifts with other riders, but there are certain hours that should be fulfilled each week. The payment is hourly and order-based - the more you work, the more you get.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>However, the job also offers its fair share of challenges. For instance, it is really hard to work as a rider during the dark and cold winters in Sweden, especially when it is raining or there is ice and snow. On the other hand, it can be a really interesting job during spring and summer when the weather is mild, as you can explore the city and enjoy Gothenburg’s vibe. </div> <div><br /></div> <span style="background-color:initial">Recently, Foodora signed an agreement with a trade union here in Sweden which will improve the working environment for riders. However, my personal opinion is that this kind of job works well as a temporary job for students. If you urgently need a place to make extra money besides your studies, or just want some extra pocket money, it should be perfect for you. </span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/Student%20Ambassadors%20Pictures%20-%20Authors/Teanette_studentblog.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="Picture of Teanette" style="margin:5px" /><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/Student%20Ambassadors%20Pictures%20-%20Authors/Nathaly_studentblog.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="Picture of Nathaly" style="margin:5px" /><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/Student%20Ambassadors%20Pictures%20-%20Authors/Mohsen_studentblog.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="Picture of Mohsen" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><br />Authors: <a href="https://api.unibuddy.co/og/chalmers-university-of-technology/buddies/students/5fb6991683fa8003cd884638?buddyPosition=share" title="Link to Teanette's Unibuddy">Teanette </a>&amp; <a href="https://api.unibuddy.co/og/chalmers-university-of-technology/buddies/students/5fa532ccac6e5303f48e5b5b?buddyPosition=share" title="Link to Nathaly's Unibuddy">Nathaly </a>&amp; <a href="https://api.unibuddy.co/og/chalmers-university-of-technology/buddies/students/5fa56d33bdd3773cfb4a1720?buddyPosition=share" title="Link to Mohsen's Unibuddy">Mohsen</a><br /><br /><br /><br /></span></div>Mon, 29 Mar 2021 10:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/education/studying-at-Chalmers/stuamb/Pages/Must-have-for-vegetarians-and-vegans.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/education/studying-at-Chalmers/stuamb/Pages/Must-have-for-vegetarians-and-vegans.aspxMust have for vegetarians and vegans<p><b>​Are you a vegetarian or vegan? Then you don’t have to worry about finding great meals while studying at Chalmers</b></p><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/Banner_veggie-01.jpg" alt="Picture of different beains in store's shelf" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><span style="background-color:initial">In this blog we will share our experiences from a vegetarian and non-vegetarian point of view, comparing what vegetarian and vegan options we’ve found while studying at Chalmers, with our own cultures back in Ecuador and Turkey.</span><div><br /><div>Our first impression was when we first went to Kårrestaurangen (The main restaurant located in the Student Union) There are three daily options where you can choose between meat, fish or a vegan dish. Always well-balanced and not at all boring. We can feel the inclusion for this group of people, which is not that small here. That’s not the only option at that building, there’s also a place called “Express” where you can buy take away with a student discount and there you also always have a vegan option. We feel that vegetarians/vegans don’t have to worry about finding their meals while studying at Chalmers.</div> <div>Since we are in an unusual situation due to the pandemic, we are not on campus all of the time. And since we are students that are on a budget, we don’t necessarily eat take-out or in a restaurant every day. So here are the experiences from two perspectives, the vegetarian from a not so vegan culture (Nathaly) and the not-yet vegetarian from a vegan friendly culture (Sena).</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Nathaly’s perspective:</strong></div> <div>In Ecuador, our traditional food usually involves some kind of meat. It was a bit of a challenge, as a vegetarian, going out to eat with friends or family back home, but I always found a way to make it possible. Sometimes I found it cheaper than normal dishes, which was a great advantage for me. When I knew I was going to come to Sweden to do my masters, I started the research about student life here. That research included the food culture, which was the least of my concerns because Sweden is known for its sustainable way of living. And being vegetarian or vegan truly makes a positive impact on the environment by having less CO2 emissions when cultivating vegetables rather than producing meat. And I wasn’t mistaken! At Kårrestaurangen, they even have a banner where they compare the gas emissions between meat, fish and vegan dishes. Truly inspiring to start eating consciously, I would say.</div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">Because I was already used to eating vegetables and fruits, when I just moved here those were the things I was looking for. I always store grains in my kitchen – which are also known to be a good source of protein – such as beans, chickpeas and lentils. For carbs I like to have rice, pasta, corn, sometimes potatoes and my beautiful cooking bananas (luckily, I can find some of them here all the way from Ecuador). The vegetables I</span><br /></div> <img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/Picture_Veggie-01.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="Picture of Nathaly holding two mushroom in front of her eyes" style="margin:5px" /><span></span><div> use to complete my meals are spinach, tomatoes, onions, peppers, and the list can go on and on, but my completely favorites are mushrooms. I am not completely vegan, that’s why I also sometimes buy some cheese to use in my meals. It’s a process to leave it behind, and hopefully I will achieve the goal someday. <span style="background-color:initial">I want to wrap up my perspective by letting you know that it doesn’t matter if you are not an excellent cooker, I wasn’t either when I first got here. There are a lot of apps or even online recipes about any dish you can think of. </span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">A</span><span style="background-color:initial">t the beginning, I needed the inspiration so those apps (Tasty, Yummly) were my best friends when it comes to cooking. Now, I am really confident to prepare meals for myself and, occasionally, for some friends without even looking at any recipe. I guess practice does really make perfect. So as my student ambassador friend, Marija, once said: I will be finishing my studies with two degrees, MSc. in Biomedical Engineering and MSc. in vegetarian cooking and baking.</span><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Sena’s perspective:</strong></div> <div>In Turkey, we have two types of meals: vegan (which contains olive oil) and non-vegan (which contains any kind of meat). And even though we have a lot of vegetarian recipes, we could also have trouble finding ingredients for those meals or, as Nathaly said, it was difficult to find vegetarian/vegan options when we wanted to eat out. I started a vegetarian diet a few months before the pandemic (for different personal reasons), and I researched how other Chalmers students got into this kind of lifestyle. According to the blog posts I read and the videos I watched; Chalmers was well adapted to this situation. It was possible and very accessible to find vegan options (even the milk you use in the coffee bought on campus). After starting my master’s programme, in Applied Mechanics, at Chalmers, I was delighted to see that the vegetarian/vegan world is even bigger, more diverse, and more important than I first thought.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>I still eat a lot like I did back in Turkey. The salads consist of mainly tomatoes, cucumbers, lettuce, onions,<br />lemon sauce and some species. The olives at breakfast are the most common part of my daily life. I also like to have in my kitchen a lot of mushrooms and vegetables that I cook with olive oil. Spinach, eggplant, cabbage, broccoli, zucchini, celery, potatoes, peppers, and carrots are important ingredients in my main meals. Also, I​</div> <img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/Picture_Veggie1-01.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="Picture of Sena holding two peppers in front of her eyes" style="margin:5px" /><span></span><div>make sure to take the time to cook soups that contain grains, such as lentils, every week. I can find most of these ingredients in Gothenburg grocery stores. I am excited by the richness of vegetarian and vegan options available at the supermarket, although there are very few ingredients that I still cannot find, such as fresh mint.</div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">One of the great advantages of studying at an international university for me is that when I talk with my friends about our culture, we always end up talking about food! We share new recipes and sometimes even​ try to cook together. If you are invited to an event, here in Gothenburg, you will always be asked about your food preferences and allergies. Food preparations are made accordingly. My first experience in this field was with the Chalmers International Student Committee (CIRC). Each semester, they prepare various orientation programs for international students who will start to study at Chalmers, and they started to contact us before we arrive. While we were still in our own countries, they sent us surveys and asked whether we are vegan/vegetarian and what kind of food we prefer (like bitter, sour, spicy, salty). To sum up, I want to draw attention to this: Being vegetarian or vegan is not just an individual’s dietary preference, it is a more sustainable choice for our entire world. &#128522;</span><br /></div></div> <div><br /></div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/Student%20Ambassadors%20Pictures%20-%20Authors/Nathaly_studentblog.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="Picture of Nathaly" style="margin:5px" /><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/Student%20Ambassadors%20Pictures%20-%20Authors/Sena_studentblog.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="Picture of Sena" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><br />Authors: <a href="https://api.unibuddy.co/og/chalmers-university-of-technology/buddies/students/5fa532ccac6e5303f48e5b5b?buddyPosition=share" title="Link to the Nathaly's Unibuddy">Nathaly ​</a>&amp; <a href="https://api.unibuddy.co/og/chalmers-university-of-technology/buddies/students/5fa71e8f728dc41b0ff73012?buddyPosition=share" title="Link to the Sena's Unibuddy">Sena</a><br /><br /></div> ​Mon, 22 Mar 2021 13:20:00 +0100https://www.chalmers.se/en/education/studying-at-Chalmers/stuamb/Pages/Making-friends-during-the-pandemic.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/education/studying-at-Chalmers/stuamb/Pages/Making-friends-during-the-pandemic.aspxMaking friends during the pandemic<p><b>​This is how I managed to find friends and community at Chalmers despite the pandemic. Here are my best tips and tricks!</b></p><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/senna-friendshipbanner.jpg" alt="Sena with her friend smiling" style="margin:5px;width:690px;height:313px" /><br /><br /><span style="background-color:initial">It is useful to divide the story of the social life I have established in my life in Gothenburg into two periods: What I did before I came to Sweden and what I did afterward. </span><span style="background-color:initial">I’ve been an orienteering team athlete in college and participated in the various communities in Turkey where I had a lively social life. When I was doing my research for Chalmers and checking the student societies, I thought I could establish such an environment in Gothenburg too. The first thing I did was to research the activities of the communities relevant to my interests and access their contact information.</span><div><br /><span style="background-color:initial"></span><div><span style="background-color:initial"> To do this, I’ve simply googled keywords like orienteering team in Chalmers, social life at Chalmers University, and Gothenburg… Then the home page led me to Chalmers web page, some student communities Facebook pages, and Gothenburg city pages. During this process, I noticed that Swedes are using Facebook very actively and that they usually answer their messages pretty quickly. I must admit that the people who entered my life in this way exceeded my expectations. Some of them even asked me questions! For example if I had found a place to stay, when I would arrive to Gothenburg or if I needed any help. These interactions made me very happy. My first social circle was formed: new teammates, mostly Swedes.</span></div> <div><br /><div>Another reasonable move I made before I came to Sweden was to contact other Chalmers students on<img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/ardasenna-friendship.png" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="Sena with her friend in the street" style="margin:5px" /><br />Unibuddy or graduates from my own country. While I was in Turkey, I asked my friends if they had any friends or relatives that are/were studying in Sweden. I wanted to learn about both Gothenburg life and the Chalmers education system from the perspective of one of my citizens. I started to communicate with these people with questions such as what their student life was like, what I should bring with me, how did the pandemic affect student life. <span style="background-color:initial">Then our conversations turned into me listening to their memories about studying at Chalmers and living in Gothenburg. This is how I became friends with many of them before I came! We decided to get fika to talk more when I arrived at Gothenburg. So our communication continued after I arrived, and they introduced me to their social circles. As a result, my second and third social circles were formed: My friends from my country and their friends from other countries!</span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div>The pandemic restrictions mostly affect indoor activities, but outdoor activities are very popular here in Gothenburg. Regardless of the weather, you can always see people going for a run outside, hiking in the natural parks, cycling, or having a barbecue. That is the advantages of living in a city surrounded by nature during the pandemic.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>So how did I expand my social circle after coming here? First, I realized that other international students were in the same situation as me. So, most of us are new here, everyone wants to make friends. For this reason, it<br />is very unlikely that a short walk or fika offer would be rejected. When you invite someone to an activity, the next offer is very likely to come from him or her. Most of the time, when you consider other offers, you are very likely to meet your friends’ friends. If you are an introverted person and aren’t active in inviting others, don’t worry though. Just think before rejecting any offers that might come your way &#128522; This led me to the fourth social circle: Friends of my friends from other countries!</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Finally, social media groups and activities. There are several groups in Sweden for people from other countries that you can find, specifically on Facebook. Moreover, they are surprisingly active. During the pandemic period, they continue their activities, most of them online, and are open to everyone. If you are staying in a student housing, you can join a Facebook group to chat with others who live in the same building. Do not forget to sign up because there will always be someone inviting you for a fika. The last social circle for now: My friends from social media platforms!</div> <div><br /></div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/Student%20Ambassadors%20Pictures%20-%20Authors/Sena_studentblog.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="Picture of ambassador(Sena)" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><br /></div> <div>Author: <a href="https://api.unibuddy.co/og/chalmers-university-of-technology/buddies/students/5fa71e8f728dc41b0ff73012?buddyPosition=share" title="Link to Senna's Unibuddy">Sena</a></div></div></div>Mon, 15 Mar 2021 09:45:00 +0100https://www.chalmers.se/en/education/studying-at-Chalmers/stuamb/Pages/The-women-who-made-me-a-scientist.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/education/studying-at-Chalmers/stuamb/Pages/The-women-who-made-me-a-scientist.aspxThe women who made me a scientist<p><b>​As we come closer to the International Women’s Day, let’s think about the influence women have in academic fields and in our lives as scientists.</b></p><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/The%20women%20who%20made%20me%20a%20scientist-banner.jpg" alt="Illustration of women" style="margin:5px;width:690px;height:313px" /><br /><br /><span style="background-color:initial">Gender stereotypes are part of a belief system that assigns a “gender” to clothes, activities, and other concepts like choice of career. It basically says that masculine things can’t possibly be feminine, and vice-versa. Following this trend, and after centuries of repression that led to men receiving the credit for most scientific advances, STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) fields are commonly viewed as “male” careers.</span><div><br /><div>Despite starting off from an unprivileged position in an already competitive area because of these stereotypes, many women have made themselves known for their brilliant work. Women have made life-changing discoveries and inventions such as chemotherapy, radiation, car heating, airplane mufflers, CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing and many others. Brilliant women like Hedy Lamarr (who was the mastermind of spread-spectrum radio, one of the principles on which Bluetooth and WiFi technologies were later based on, all the while being a Hollywood movie star) have demonstrated that women are capable to do so much more than what their gender stereotype limits them into.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>It was women who helped me embody the woman that I am, and it was women too who inspired me to pursue a career in STEM: my high school chemistry teacher told me what it means to succeed in the workplace when you’re the only woman around, and my clinical chemistry teacher passed onto me her unique passion of working with microscopic beings as if they had their own personalities and needs. My mom (who is not only an awesome woman, but also an awesome industrial engineer) was also my calculus teacher for two years and I was lucky enough to get her to teach me about life and about triple integrals.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Another thing that they ingrained very deeply in me is my right to be treated with the same respect as my<br />male peers, and that someone’s gender is not an indication of their capability to work, irrespective of the subject. I have been lucky to work in a field where the people I’ve encountered along the way were influenced<img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/womens,%20Size%20350px%20x%20105%20px.png" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="Picture of a female scientist" style="margin:5px" /> by similar people as the people who have influenced me. This has helped me join a solid scientific community, where I have encountered both women and men whom I admire and respect. I was very happy to come to Chalmers and experience from my peers a similar respect for ideas and perspectives regardless of who I am or where I come from.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">I</span><span style="background-color:initial">n</span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"> a field with a relatively larger female presence such as Biotechnology and life sciences, where more than half of doctorates are women the story is, however, very similar to that in the fields dominated by men: it is the men who win the most grants and publish their results more often as first and principal authors and work by female scientists tends to be cited less than the work of male authors. This problem is also a centuries-old one: Jocelyn Bell, who discovered pulsars in 1967, felt the need to remove her engagement ring before going into the lab to maintain her reputation as a serious researcher, and most biographies of women in science carry on the perception that “women who go into science are venturing into an alien male world”.</span></div> <div><br /></div> <div>As a female scientist and as a Chalmerist, it is my goal to inspire others as my role models have inspired me and to help the world to view science as a profession carried out by people rather than a field dependent of gender. It would be an honor if I could be even half of what I think about the women who made me.</div></div> <div><br /></div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/education/Student%20Life/Student%20Blogs/Student%20Ambassadors%20Pictures%20-%20Authors/Abril_studentblog.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="Picture of Abril" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><br /></div> <div>Author: <a href="https://api.unibuddy.co/og/chalmers-university-of-technology/buddies/students/5fcf4e54ffd52f015226e403?buddyPosition=share" title="Link to Ambassadors Unibuddy">Abril</a></div>Mon, 08 Mar 2021 17:05:00 +0100