Removal of Organic Contaminants in Stormwater Treatment Facilities

Recent research has shown that stormwater often contain organic pollutant at levels exceeding environmental quality standards. To comply with quality guidelines for receiving waters, stormwater treatment is considered critical. However, there is an overall lack of data available to describe the removal of organic contaminants in stormwater treatment technologies. The aim of this project is to clarify the fate of organic contaminants during stormwater treatment. The project will focus on pollutant fate in retention ponds and filtration media, two of the currently most used treatment methods for stormwater. The pollutant pathways in ponds will be studied by monitoring influent and effluent water quality and quantity, as well as quality and quantity of stagnant phases (biofilm and sediment). Batch tests will be used for comparing the capacity of a range of sorbents to remove dissolved pollutants in stormwater. Pollutant removal will be studied in lab-scale filters under controlled water quality and quantity conditions. Study of influent and effluent pollutant concentrations as well as concentrations in the filter material will reveal pollutant fate during filtration. This research will contribute data essential for the development of efficient treatment methods for organic pollutants in stormwater. The results are of interest for stakeholders responsible for the protection of stormwater and receiving water quality, such as landowners and municipal administrations.

Partner organizations

  • University of British Columbia (UBC) (Academic, Canada)
Start date 01/01/2013
End date The project is closed: 31/12/2016

​Stormwater from urban areas is often contaminated with metals, organic pollutants and nutrients. Filtration of stormwater is one of the most promising techniques for removal of dissolved, colloidal and particulate pollutants.

The aim of this research is to investigate the efficiency of different filter media to remove pollutants from stormwater. We use filter materials that are cheap, easily accessible and available in large quantities, show good water permeability and may be reused or recycled. The focus is on organic pollutants, because there is currently limited knowledge on the occurrence of these substances in urban runoff and the potential of using adsorption filters for removing organic stormwater contaminants. All filter media are first investigated using synthetic stormwater in the lab, in order to obtain a controlled environment so that the results from different tests can be easily compared. The next step is to investigate whether the filter materials are effective to remove pollutants in natural stormwater, where many external factors can affect the materials’ capacity and durability. The experiments are expected to provide valuable information on the effectiveness of a range of potential filter media for removal of pollutants in stormwater, and an estimate of filter life and maintenance requirements.

 

The project is carried out at the Division of Water Environment Technology.

Keywords: Urban runoff, organic pollutants, colloids, adsorption, filtration technologies, filter media, stormwater management

Project members

Project leader
Karin Björklund

Project members
Post doc Karin Björklund
Docent Ann-Margret Strömvall
Professor Loretta Li (UBC)

Contact
Karin Björklund

External partners at the project
​University of British Columbia, Kanada
Chalmers Areas of Advance
​Built Environment

Funded by

  • Formas (Public, Sweden)
  • J. Gust. Richert stiftelse (Non Profit, Sweden)

The project is carried out at the Division of Water Environment Technology.

Keywords: Urban runoff, organic pollutants, colloids, adsorption, filtration technologies, filter media, stormwater management

Published: Wed 14 Aug 2013. Modified: Thu 31 May 2018