News: Space, Earth and Environment, Rymd- och geovetenskap, Energi och miljöhttp://www.chalmers.se/sv/nyheterNews related to Chalmers University of TechnologyWed, 01 Dec 2021 04:08:54 +0100http://www.chalmers.se/sv/nyheterhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/ict/news/Pages/Call-for-hosting-a-WASP-distinguished-guest-professor-.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/ict/news/Pages/Call-for-hosting-a-WASP-distinguished-guest-professor-.aspx​Call for a proposal – hosting a WASP distinguished guest professor <p><b>​WASP is announcing funding for guest professors for a period of two years, expecting to stay at the host university approximately six months per year. The areas are: autonomous systems, software, AI/MLX and AI/math.​</b></p><div><b style="background-color:initial"><br /></b></div> <div><b style="background-color:initial">Deadline: Dec 20, 2021</b><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div>In total, <b>two positions will be founded</b>, and the WASP university partners can apply. The funding is valid for <b>all WASP areas</b> (autonomous systems, software, AI/MLX and AI/math).</div> <div>The main ranking criterium is the applicant's excellence, the probability of the realization, and finally, the program/aim of the visit. WASP also welcomes a combination with other initiatives or/and involvement of Swedish industry. </div> <div>Financial conditions are flexible and will match the levels of top-level researchers.  </div> <div>WASP is expecting to get the proposals during Q4 2021. Internal Chalmers deadline is Dec 20. A university can propose several candidates. </div> <div>During Q1 or Q2 2022, WASP will approve in total two proposals. A strict policy of gender balance (50/50) will be followed. </div> <div><b>The expected start of the visit</b> is Q3/Q4 2022, or Q1 2023. </div> <div><br /></div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">Proposal Submission</h3> <div>Send a proposal to <b>Chalmers WASP</b> <b>representative</b> to <a href="mailto:ivica.crnkovic@chalmers.se">Ivica Crnkovic</a>, <b>l</b><b>atest Dec 20, 2021</b>.</div> <div>The proposal should include:</div> <div><ul><li>Name and affiliation of the distinguished guest professor, with a short motivation, overall preliminary schedule and activity plan for the visit.</li> <li>The hosting department and division/research group.</li> <li>If possible, a letter of interest from the potential distinguished guest professor or a statement that the professor has been contacted ad has expressed interest in the visit.</li> <li>CV of the proposed guest professor</li> <li>The head of the department must sign the application</li></ul></div> <div><br /></div> <div>The applications will be analyzed by Chalmers internal committee (to be defined) before sending to WASP.  Note that Chalmers will follow the recommendations from WASP and try to provide a balanced list of the candidates. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>For more information, contact please, <a href="mailto:ivica.crnkovic@chalmers.se">Ivica Crnkovic</a></div> <div><a href="mailto:ivica.crnkovic@chalmers.se"></a><br /></div> ​Thu, 25 Nov 2021 13:00:00 +0100https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/see/news/Pages/EU-deforestation-proposals.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/see/news/Pages/EU-deforestation-proposals.aspxResearch at the centre of EU deforestation proposals<p><b>​In its new proposal aimed at reducing tropical deforestation, the European Commission has wrongly left out certain goods which make a significant contribution. This is the view of the researchers behind some of the data on which the Commission based its proposal. The proposed legislation places demands on those who import and sell beef, coffee, cocoa, wood, palm oil and soybeans to the EU. But rubber and maize should also be on the list, according to Martin Persson and Florence Pendrill at Chalmers University of Technology.​</b></p>​<span style="background-color:initial">Previous research from Chalmers has shown that the EU has a great responsibility for tropical deforestation. EU imports of products such as palm oil and soy cause around 200,000 hectares of tropical deforestation annually. Now, the European Commission is proposing ambitious legislation to halt the EU's contribution to deforestation.</span><div><br /><div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/SEE/Nyheter/Martin-Florence.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" />“In order to determine which products are to be covered by the legislation, the Commission has used our data on how EU imports of agricultural products contribute to deforestation. The only problem is that they have used our data incorrectly and therefore excluded maize and rubber, despite the fact that those products also contribute significantly to deforestation,” explains Martin Persson, who together with colleague Florence Pendrill works at the Division of Physical Resource Theory at Chalmers.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>The Commission has concluded that restrictions on rubber and maize would entail high costs while achieving a relatively small effect on deforestation, compared to the other six products on the list. But this conclusion is built on a flawed comparison – the Chalmers data on deforestation only concerns EU imports of unprocessed natural rubber, but in their calculations of the costs, the Commission have also included processed, recycled, and synthetic rubber, which then yields a  misleading cost-effectiveness ratio.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>In addition, import data from the period 2008–2017 has been used, while the data relating to deforestation come from a much shorter period, 2015–2019.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>“When we correct the calculations and instead compare the value of the import flows that correspond to the goods included in our deforestation analysis – during the same time period – there is no longer any significant difference between the different goods, and therefore we see no reason for the legislation to exclude rubber and maize,” says Martin Persson.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>To address this oversight, Martin Persson, Florence Pendrill and his colleague Thomas Kastner at Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Center wrote a <a href="http://www.focali.se/filer/Focali%20brief_2021_02_Flawed%20numbers%20underpin%20recommendations%20to%20exclude%20commodities%20from%20EU%20deforestation%20legislation.pdf">policy brief in which they addressed the miscalculations</a>.  </div> <div><br /></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><a href="https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/oct/26/reducing-scope-of-eu-anti-deforestation-law-misguided-say-scientists">The policy brief was picked up by the British newspaper The Guardian</a>, who also published <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/nov/17/eu-deforestation-beef-coffee-import-ban-commodities-endangered-forests">EU Environment Commissioner Virginijus Sinkevičius’ response to the criticism</a>. </span><br /></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><em>Text: Christian Löwhagen</em></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><em>Photo: Matt Zimmerman. Portraits: Anna-Lena Lundqvist/Chalmers</em></span></div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3"><span>Read more:  </span></h3> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><a href="http://www.focali.se/en/articles/artikelarkiv/new-focali-policy-brief-flawed-numbers-underpin-recommendations-to-exclude-commodities-from-eu-deforestation-legislation">​New Focali policy brief: Flawed numbers underpin recommendations to exclude commodities from EU deforestation legislation</a>  </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><br /></p> <div><span style="color:rgb(33, 33, 33);font-family:inherit;font-size:16px;font-weight:600;background-color:initial">Previous articles about </span><span style="color:rgb(33, 33, 33);font-family:inherit;font-size:16px;font-weight:600;background-color:initial">​</span><span style="color:rgb(33, 33, 33);font-family:inherit;font-size:16px;font-weight:600;background-color:initial">Martin and Florence’s research at chalmers.se</span><br /></div> <div><a href="/en/departments/see/news/Pages/How-the-EU-can-reduce-its-impact-on-tropical-deforestation.aspx">How the EU can reduce its impact on tropical deforestation</a> <br /></div> <div><a href="/en/departments/see/news/Pages/EU-consumption-plays-major-role-in-tropical-deforestation.aspx">EU consumption linked to tropical deforestation</a> <br /></div> <div><br /></div></div>Wed, 24 Nov 2021 11:00:00 +0100https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/see/news/Pages/Anders-Lyngfelt-Pioneer-in-Energy.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/see/news/Pages/Anders-Lyngfelt-Pioneer-in-Energy.aspxEnergy pioneer honoured by scientific journal<p><b>​The prestigious scientific journal Energy &amp; Fuels is dedicating a special issue to Anders Lyngfelt, professor of energy technology at Chalmers, in their series Pioneers in Energy Research. Anders has been chosen for his leading research on chemical looping combustion, a technology that is both very energy efficient and makes carbon capture simple and cheap.– I am glad to see an increasing interest in capturing carbon and a growing insight that it is one of the tools we must start using on a large scale. We need to do EVERYTHING, turn every stone, both to quickly reduce emissions and to capture carbon dioxide from the atmosphere with negative emissions, says Anders Lyngfelt.</b></p>​<span style="background-color:initial">Energy &amp; Fuels has been published since 1978 and as the name suggests, the content spans broad research areas related to energy and fuels. Anders is one of Chalmers and Sweden's most cited researchers and has been published in Energy &amp; Fuels about 40 times. He is the fourth researcher in the magazine's series on Pioneers in Energy Research, the previous three work in solar energy, crude oil and bioenergy and fuels. </span><div><br /></div> <div>– It feels great! In addition to me getting this acknowledgement, I enjoy the fact that our research area gets attention. Energy &amp; Fuels is definitely a significant and serious magazine, with a good impact factor.</div> <div>That Anders - and his research colleagues - are getting this honor is because they have led the development of the technology chemical looping combustion for a long time. It is an efficient combustion technology that makes it possible to easily and cheaply collect the carbon dioxide created during combustion, for further storage. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>Capturing and storing carbon dioxide is becoming an increasingly interesting method of reducing global warming. But the flue gases from conventional combustion - to produce district heating and electricity, for example - contain only about 15 percent carbon dioxide and separating it is expensive and also costs a lot of the energy that would go to producing district heating and electricity.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>– That is why carbon dioxide capture is only available at two power plants in the world today. But with chemical looping combustion, there is no need for the complicated gas separation. Ideally, in addition to water vapor, it is pure carbon dioxide that comes out of the chimney, ready for storage.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Although Anders and chemical looping combustion are now being featured in Energy &amp; Fuels, the technology is not used anywhere in the industry today. This is largely due to the fact that today there is already existing technology for combustion and that there is not strong enough pressure on the industry to collect carbon dioxide. But now that interest in carbon capture and storage is increasing, so is interest in chemical looping combustion. And the technology can make a big contribution, Anders believes.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>– The so called carbon dioxide budget, the amount of carbon dioxide that can be released into the atmosphere without us exceeding the target of 1.5 degrees temperature increase, I likely to be finished in 2028 at the rate we are keeping today.</div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">–</span><span style="background-color:initial"> </span>No matter how optimistic your calculations are, no one believes that we will stop emitting carbon dioxide in seven years - so all emissions after 2028 must be removed from the atmosphere with so-called negative emissions. Here, chemical looping combustion can be very useful.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>One area of use that may be relevant is BECCS, Bio-Energy with Carbon Capture and Storage. Carbon dioxide is then collected at, for example, bio-fired power plants to achieve a net reduction of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Anders is one of the organizers behind next year's conference on negative emissions, the second in a series of conferences that will increase knowledge about the various possibilities that exist for achieving negative emissions.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Anders now hopes that Sweden - from which the development of the technology has been led for many years - will be the first country where the technology is used on an industrial scale.</div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">–</span><span style="background-color:initial"> </span>My main focus right now is to get someone to dare take the step and use this technology. It is nonsense that it would not matter what we do in &quot;small&quot; Sweden. If we go first and show others how to do, then they will follow. I'm convinced of that.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><em>Text: Christian Löwhagen. </em></div> <div><br /></div> <div>Note that the Pioneers in Energy issue featuring Anders Lyngfelt will be published in late 2022, and already 37 other researchers has volunteered to participate in the issue .</div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="https://negativeco2emissions2020.com/">Read more about the 2nd International Conference on Negative CO2 Emissions, at Chalmers 14-17 June 2022</a>.</div> <div><br /></div> Thu, 18 Nov 2021 00:00:00 +0100https://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/Prestigious-funding-to-researchers-at-Chalmers.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/Prestigious-funding-to-researchers-at-Chalmers.aspxPrestigious funding to researchers at Chalmers<p><b>​The Swedish Research Council distributes 2.3 billion in natural and engineering sciences (2021 – 2025) and medicine and health (2021 –​ 2026).Of these project grants, a total of SEK 123 million go to 33 researchers at Chalmers.​</b></p>​These<span style="background-color:initial"> researchers at Chalmers receive grants – sorted by department:</span><span style="background-color:initial"> </span><h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">Department of Biology and Biological Engineering</h2> <div>Alexandra Stubelius, <span style="background-color:initial">Florian David and </span><span style="background-color:initial">​Verena Siewers</span><span style="background-color:initial"> about their projects: </span><span style="background-color:initial"><a href="/en/departments/bio/news/Pages/BIO-researchers-receive-prestigious-VR-grants.aspx">BIO researchers receive prestigious VR-grants​</a></span></div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">Department of Computer Science and Engineering</h2> <div>Ivica Crnkovic </div> <div>Mary Sheeran </div> <div>Marina Papatriantafilou </div> <div>Magnus Myreen </div> <div>Philippas Tsigas<span style="background-color:initial"> </span></div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">Department of Electrical Engineering</h2> <div>Erik Agrell </div> <div>Hana Dobsicek Trefna</div> <div>Giuseppe Durisi</div> <div>Mikael Persson</div> <div>Rui Lin<span style="background-color:initial"> </span></div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">Department of Physics</h2> <div>Christian Forssén , <span style="background-color:initial">Mats Halvarsson, </span><span style="background-color:initial">I</span><span style="background-color:initial">stvan Pusztai och </span><span style="background-color:initial">Mattias Thuvander</span><span style="background-color:initial"> tells about the projects they have received grants for: </span><span style="background-color:initial"><a href="/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Physics-researchers-receive-16-million-in-grants-from-the-Swedish-Research-Council.aspx">Physics researchers receive 16 million in grants from the Swedish Research Council​</a></span></div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">Department of Industrial and Materials Science</h2> <div>Ragnar Larsson <span style="background-color:initial"> </span></div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering</h2> <div>Joakim Andréasson</div> <div>Maths Karlsson</div> <div>Andreas Dahlin </div> <div>Louise Olsson</div> <div>Marcus Wilhelmsson<span style="background-color:initial"> <br />The Head of the Department comments on the news and the researchers tells about their projects: <br /><a href="/en/departments/chem/news/Pages/Chemistry-researchers-receive-prestigious-funding-.aspx" title="Link to newarticle ">Chemistry researchers recieve prime funding </a></span></div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">Department of Mathematical Sciences</h2> <div>Dennis Eriksson</div> <div>Anders Södergren<span style="background-color:initial"> </span></div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">Department of Mechanics and Maritime Sciences</h2> <div>Henrik Ström, who studies <span style="background-color:initial">systems where small reactive particles move in complex geometries. These can be sensors, for example, where you want to be able to detect as quickly as possible whether a certain type of particle is present in a liquid. Read more about his project </span><span style="background-color:initial"><a href="/en/departments/m2/news/Pages/Henrik-Ström-receives-prestigious-funding-from-the-Swedish-Research-Council.aspx">&quot;Migration, mixing and modulation in reactive Brownian systems of arbitrary geometric complexity.&quot;​</a></span><span style="background-color:initial">​</span></div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience</h2> <div>Saroj Prasad Dash </div> <div>Göran Johansson </div> <div>Samuel Lara Avila </div> <div>Simone Gasparinetti </div> <div>Shumin Wang</div> <div>Jochen Schröder</div> <a href="/en/departments/mc2/news/Pages/MC2-researchers-receive-millions-in-grants-from-the-Swedish-Research-Council.aspx"><div>Read more about some of the research projects</div></a><h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">Department of Space, Earth and Environment</h2> <div>Giuliana Cosentino, who is researching how and why stars form in the coldest and densest parts of the galaxies. Read more about her <a href="/en/departments/see/news/Pages/VR-grant-to-star-formation-project.aspx">Shock Compressions in the Interstellar Medium, as triggers of Star Formation</a><span style="background-color:initial">. </span></div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="https://www.vr.se/english/applying-for-funding/decisions/2021-08-25-natural-and-engineering-sciences.html" target="_blank" title="Link to teh Swedish research council"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Read more about the projects within natural and engineering sciences at the Swedish Research Council</a></div> <div><a href="https://www.vr.se/english/applying-for-funding/decisions/2021-08-25-natural-and-engineering-sciences.html" target="_blank" title="Link to teh Swedish research council"></a></div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="/en/news/Pages/Read%20more%20about%20the%20projects%20within%20natural%20and%20engineering%20sciences%20at%20the%20Swedish%20Research%20Council" target="_blank" title="Link to teh Swedish research council" style="outline:currentcolor none 0px"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Read more about the projects within medicin and health at the Swedish Research Council</a>  </div> ​Fri, 05 Nov 2021 00:00:00 +0100https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/see/news/Pages/History-fossil-dependence.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/see/news/Pages/History-fossil-dependence.aspxCan history teach us how to reduce fossil reliance?<p><b>​Limiting climate change to the 1.5°C target set by the Paris Climate Agreement will likely require coal and gas power use to decline at rates that are unprecedented for any large country, an analysis of decadal episodes of fossil fuel decline in 105 countries between 1960 and 2018 shows. The researchers also identified factors that has facitilitated rapid decline in fossil fuel use: competing technologies, strong motivation to change energy sources, and effective government institutions.</b></p><div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/SEE/Nyheter/Jessica-Jewell-200.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:120px;height:145px" />“Prior studies sometimes looked at the world as a whole but failed to find such cases, because on the global level the use of fossil fuels has always grown over time. So, w<span style="background-color:initial">e were surprised to find that the use of some fossil fuels, particularly oil, actually declined quite rapidly in the 1970s and the 1980s in Western Europe and other </span><span style="background-color:initial">industrialized countries like Japan,” says Jessica Jewell, </span><span style="background-color:initial">associate professor in energy transitions at Chalmers University in Sweden, and</span><span style="background-color:initial"> professor at the University of Bergen in Norway, and the corresponding author of the study. </span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div>“This is not the time period that is typically associated with energy transitions, but we came to believe that some important lessons can be drawn from there,” says Jessica. <div><br /></div> <div><div>To explore whether any periods of historical fossil fuel decline are similar to scenarios needed to achieve the Paris target, Jewell and her colleagues, Vadim Vinichenko, a post-doctoral researcher at Chalmers and Aleh Cherp, a professor at Central European University in Austria and Lund University in Sweden, identified 147 episodes within a sample of 105 countries between 1960 and 2018 in which coal, oil, or natural gas use declined faster than 5 per cent over a decade. <br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><div>The authors found that nearly all scenarios for the decline of coal in Asia in line with Paris Agreement’s goals would be historically unprecedented or have rare precedents. Over half of scenarios envisioned for coal decline in OECD countries and over half of scenarios for cutting gas use in reforming economies, the Middle East, or Africa would also be unprecedented or have rare precedents as well.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Historically, when fossil fuel use has declined rapidly in larger countries, to an extent corresponding to the necessary reduction according to the climate scenarios, it has required advances in competing technologies, effective government institutions to implement the required changes, and strong motivation to change energy systems, for instance to avoid energy security threats.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>“This signals both an enormous challenge of seeing through such rapid decline of fossil fuels and the need to learn from historical lessons when rapid declines were achieved on the national scale,” says Jewell.</div></div></div></div> <div><br /></div> <div>Read the scientific paper<span style="background-color:initial">: </span><span style="background-color:initial">“<a href="https://www.cell.com/one-earth/fulltext/S2590-3322%2821%2900534-0">Historical precedents and feasibility of rapid coal and gas decline required for the 1.5°C target</a>”, </span><span style="background-color:initial">Vadim Vinichenko, </span><span style="background-color:initial">Aleh Cherp, </span><span style="background-color:initial">Jessica Jewell, </span><span style="background-color:initial">published in One Earth.  </span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">Read a longer version of the press release: </span><span style="background-color:initial"><a href="https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/931598">Historical analysis finds no precedent for the rate of coal and gas power decline needed to limit climate change to 1.5°C</a>, on which the text above is based.</span><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div>Thu, 04 Nov 2021 06:00:00 +0100https://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/ict/news/Pages/next-Vice-Director.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/ict/news/Pages/next-Vice-Director.aspxICT AoA is looking for the next Vice-Director<p><b>Do you like to communicate, build relationships, and have a long-term vision and a desire to change the status quo? Do you also have an interest in leadership​ – take a look at this opportunity! ​We are looking for the next Vice-Director of Information and Communication Technology Area of Advance.</b></p>Chalmers' areas of advance are thematic platforms for strategy and long-term collaboration that aim to address specific challenges relevant to industry and society. They also offer common access to cutting-edge research infrastructures as well as to several targeted research centers. The aim is to generate new knowledge and solutions by breaking the boundaries of traditional academic disciplines and collaborating with various societal actors. <div><h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">Information and Communication Technology Area of Advance  (ICT AoA)</h3> <div>The vision of ICT <span style="background-color:initial">AoA</span><span style="background-color:initial"> </span><span style="background-color:initial">is to be a significant contributor t</span><span style="background-color:initial">o Chalmers and society in their digital transformations. In particular, the ICT AoA promotes the development of sustainable ICT tools and enablers for a sustainable transformation of society. To achieve this goal, the ICT AoA works with the departments, the education organization, and Chalmers strategic industrial partners to promote and support excellent research and education initiatives, especially those that do not naturally fall within the domain of a single department. </span></div> <div> </div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3"><span>The role of vice-director</span></h3> <div> </div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">As a vic</span><span style="background-color:initial">e-director, you have overall responsibility for the ICT AoA, together with the director, Prof. Erik Ström, and the ICT AoA management team. This means that you are expected to design activities and initiatives that help Chalmers address selected societal challenges within ICT. This involves engaging both Chalmers' faculty and relevant actors in society. </span></div> <div> </div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3"><span>Who are we looking for?</span></h3> <div> </div> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span>Y</span><span></span><span>ou are a </span><span>docent or professor</span><span> at Chalmers in an area that is relevant for ICT </span><span>AoA</span><span>. You like to communicate, build relationships, and have a long-term vision and a desire to change the status quo. You are well organized and have an interest in leadership, interdisciplinary research, and collaboration with industry and relevant actors in society. Understanding Swedish is advantageous for this role. The role is time-limited to 3 years with the possibility of a prolongment of additional 3 years (6 years in total). The required commitment, which is 15%-25% of full time, is negotiated individually, in a dialogue with the vice-rector for research, with the ICT AoA director, and the department.</span></p> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3"><span>Application procedure</span></h3> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><a href="https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=vsolict21" title="link to application form" target="_blank"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Please upload to EasyChair​</a><span> </span>containing the following information:</span></div> <div><ul><li><span style="background-color:initial">CV</span></li> <li><span style="background-color:initial">Personal letter of maximum 2 pages</span></li> <li><span style="background-color:initial">Additional material if needed</span></li></ul></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><b>Application deadline: </b>7 December, 2021</span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">If you have questions, please get in touch with the following persons:</span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><b><a href="mailto:erik.strom@chalmers.se">Erik Ström</a></b>, Director, ICT AoA</span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><b><a href="mailto:durisi@chalmers.se">Giuseppe Durisi</a></b>, Vice-Director, ICT </span><span style="background-color:initial">AoA</span><span style="background-color:initial"> </span></div> <div> </div> <div></div></div> ​Mon, 01 Nov 2021 07:00:00 +0100https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/see/news/Pages/William-Chalmers-lecture-2021-Susanne-Aalto.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/see/news/Pages/William-Chalmers-lecture-2021-Susanne-Aalto.aspxSusanne Aalto, this year’s William Chalmers lecturer<p><b>​How gigantic black holes in the centres of galaxies grow is one of the key questions of life, the universe and everything. And searching for an answer to that question is something that Susanne Aalto, a professor of radio astronomy, devotes her working life to. </b></p>​<span style="background-color:initial">“The black heart of the galaxies – where molecules feed monsters” is the title of this year’s William Chalmers lecture to be given by Aalto, which is derived from studies that her research team is conducting on what is contained at the centre of galaxies. With the aid of the ALMA telescope in Chile and its array of 66 synchronised antennas, they discovered something new in the universe – galaxies whose central parts are so enshrouded in dust and gas that not even an X-ray can pass through them. In visible light they look dull, without any signs of interesting activity. But measurements in the radio spectrum reveal hitherto unknown and very rapid growth behind the dust curtains.</span><div> It was</div> <div>“What is actually hiding in there? It’s difficult to see since the dust absorbs visible light – it’s rather like looking at a lamp through a blanket. Radio waves can, however, pass through the dust and give us an idea of what is happening in there, but it’s more tricky than I first thought.”</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Aalto suspects that it could be rapidly growing black holes. Supermassive black holes are generally assumed to have grown when the universe was considerably younger. But Aalto believes that this can also happen now, but that the growth mainly takes place behind vast quantities of dust.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/SEE/Nyheter/Susanne_Aalto_180.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" />“Supermassive black holes grow along with their host galaxy. But it’s not that they just swallow up everything that comes their way. The fact is that black holes, like awkward kids at the dinner table, are quite difficult to feed. They control their growth and a lot of matter that flows towards them is flung out in winds or narrow jets. The question is how the enormous galaxy and the tiny black hole – imagine a billion suns tucked away in a thimble – communicate with one another? How does the interaction work when they grow together? This is a key to understanding the development of galaxies, which is in turn an important piece of the puzzle for the development of the entire universe. My dream discovery is to solve this puzzle,” says Aalto.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>In order to try to see inside the dust curtains her research team, together with an international team, have developed a method by which they use molecules in the dust as a measuring instrument. The molecules absorb energy-rich infrared light from the interior of the galaxy and then send out corresponding energy in the form of radio waves that can force their way out through the dust. By studying radio waves Aalto and her colleagues have started to piece together the puzzle from the outside to find answers about the processes that have given rise to the energy-rich infrared light. A growing black hole, or perhaps a form of extreme star formation that we have never seen before?</div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">Welcome to the lecture</h3> <div>The William Chalmers Lecture is to be given in Swedish on 4 November at 18.00 in the RuNan conference hall, Students’ Union Building (Kårhus) , Chalmers. You can also follow the presentation live via YouTube. <a href="/sv/institutioner/see/kalendarium/Sidor/William-Chalmers-forelasning-2021-Susanne-Aalto.aspx">Read more about the lecture and register for it</a>. </div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">Read more: </h3> <div><a href="/sv/nyheter/magasin/Documents/Chalmers%20magasin%20nr2%202019.pdf">An extended interview with Susanne Aalto is available to read in the Chalmers’ journal Chalmers Magasin (in Swedish​</a>) . </div>Fri, 29 Oct 2021 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/see/news/Pages/Growth-of-solar-and-wind-power.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/see/news/Pages/Growth-of-solar-and-wind-power.aspxExpansion of wind and solar power too slow to stop climate change<p><b>​The production of renewable energy is increasing every year. But after analysing the growth rates of wind and solar power in 60 countries, researchers at Chalmers, Lund University and Central European University in Vienna, Austria conclude that virtually no country is moving sufficiently fast to avoid global warming of 1.5°C or even 2°C. </b></p>&quot;This is the first time that the maximum growth rate in individual countries has been accurately measured, and it shows the enormous scale of the challenge of replacing traditional energy sources with renewables, as well as the need to explore diverse technologies and scenarios&quot;, says Jessica Jewell, Associate Professor in Energy Transitions at Chalmers University of Technology.​<div><br /></div> <div>​The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has identified energy scenarios compatible with keeping global warming under 1.5°C or 2°C. Most of these scenarios envision very rapid growth of renewable electricity: on average   about 1.4 per cent of total global electricity supply per year for both wind and solar power, and over 3 per cent in more ambitious solar power scenarios. But the researchers’ new findings show that achieving such rapid growth has so far only been possible for a few countries.  <div><br /></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">Measuring and predicting the growth of new technologies like renewable energy is difficult, as they do not grow linearly. Instead, the growth usually follows a so-called S-curve. This means that when production of wind or solar power begins in a country it first accelerates exponentially, then stabilizes to linear growth for a while, and in the end slows down as the market becomes saturated.</span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/SEE/Nyheter/Jessica-Jewell-200.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" />&quot;Scholars typically assess technological growth by measuring how fast a given technology reaches market saturation. But for wind and solar power this method does not work, because we don’t know when and at what levels they will saturate. We came up with a new method: to use mathematical models to measure the slope of the S-curve, i.e. the maximum growth rate achieved at its steepest point. It is an entirely novel way to look at the growth of new technologies&quot;, says Jessica Jewell. </div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">Analysis of 60 countries</h3> <div>The researchers use these mathematical models to estimate the maximum growth rates achieved in the 60 largest countries which together produce ca 95% of the world’s electricity. They show that the average rate of onshore wind power growth achieved at the steepest point of the S-curves is 0.8% (with half of the countries falling within the 0.6-1.1% range) of the total electricity supply per year. For solar power, these estimates are somewhat lower: 0.6% on average (range 0.4-0.9%). </div> <div><br /></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">Higher rates, comparable to those required in climate scenarios, are indeed sometimes achieved, but typically in smaller countries. For example, wind power in Ireland expanded at some 2.6% per year while solar power in Chile has grown at 1.8% per year. However, fast growth is much rarer in larger countries. Among larger countries, only Germany has so far been able to sustain growth of wind power comparable with median climate scenarios (above 1.5% per year). </span><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/SEE/Nyheter/Aleh-Cherp-200.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" />&quot;In other words, to stay on track for climate targets, the whole world should build wind power as fast as Germany has recently&quot; says Aleh Cherp, a professor in Environmental Sciences and Policy at Central European University and Lund University. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>(As a side-note, Sweden has been growing wind power (including offshore) at about 1.6% per year in the last decade but this is at the upper end of the growth we observed in other countries.)</div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3"><span>​Why late adopter grow equally slow</span></h3> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span>To investigate future prospects of ren</span><span>ewables, the researchers have also compared th</span><span>eir growth in the pioneering countries (mostly in the European Union and other high-income industrialised nations) and in the rest of the world, where solar and wind power were introduced later. </span><span>The</span><span> latter group</span><span> includes most developing and emerging economies that would be responsible for the bulk of global energy use and thus need to deploy most of wind and solar power in the 21st century. It is hypothetically p</span><span>ossible that these countries could skip the trial-and-error stage which slowed down the early adopters, and thus leapfrog to higher growth rates. Unfortunately, the researchers discover that this is not the case. ​</span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span><br /></span></p> <div>&quot;There are usually reasons why they are late to enter the race. It can be because of vested interests, weaker institutions, and an investment environment that doesn’t support new technologies as well as from unsuitable geography. Those reasons have prevented renewable energy from taking off in the first place and make it especially difficult to replicate or exceed the growth rates achieved in leaders. Thus, we cannot automatically assume that the countries which introduce wind and solar power later would learn from prior experience and grow these technologies faster&quot;, says Cherp.</div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">Challenges for policy makers</h3> <div>The study highlights several policy challenges. One is for high-income countries to avoid the slowdown of solar and wind expansion, recently observed in several places. Another is for major Asian economies such as India and China to increase the growth rates so that renewables start growing faster than electricity demand and eventually push out fossil fuels. This can be achieved by widening the cost gap between renewables and the fossils, which include subsidies, phasing out or taxing competing technologies and supporting grid integration. </div> <div>&quot;Finally, we should recognize that there may be natural limits to how fast wind and solar can be expanded and thus we should systematically investigate the feasibility of other climate solutions&quot;, says Cherp.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><em>Text: Christian Löwhagen</em></div> <div><em>Image credits: Main photo: Pixabay. Jessica Jewell: Udo Schlög. Aleh Cherp: Johan Persson. </em></div> <div><br /></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">The article <a href="https://doi.org/10.1038/s41560-021-00863-0">National growth dynamics of wind and solar power compared to the growth required for global climate targets</a> was published in the journal Nature Energy, written by Cherp, A., Vinichenko, V., Tosun, J., Gordon, J. &amp; Jewell, J.. Nature Energy 6, 742–754 (2021). </span></div></div>Mon, 25 Oct 2021 13:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/energy/news/Pages/Sonia-Yeh-new-Co-Director-for-Energy-Area-of-Advance.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/energy/news/Pages/Sonia-Yeh-new-Co-Director-for-Energy-Area-of-Advance.aspxSonia Yeh new Co-Director for Energy Area of Advance<p><b>&quot;I am grateful to have Sonia Yeh in the management of the Energy area of Advance. As Area of Advance leaders, we will also have the support of Anders Hellman and Cecilia Geijer, who complement our competencies&quot;, says Tomas Kåberger, Director of Chalmers Energy area of Advance. Sonia Yeh, professor of energy and transport systems at Chalmers, replaces Anders Ådahl, as he has moved on to new assignments for the Chalmers University Foundation.​</b></p><span style="background-color:initial">&quot;I have for some time been considering getting more involved with central strategic planning at Chalmers. And this assignment seems to mean a good balance between increased responsibility and new experiences. So I am very happy to take on the task and really look forward to working with the management team over the next three years to manage one of Chalmers' largest research areas, says&quot; Sonia Yeh.<br /><br /></span><div><strong>What do you see as your most important task?</strong></div> <div>&quot;First and foremost, one of the most important tasks as a deputy is to support the Area of Advance leader's visions and strategies. In addition, I hope that my experience from researching, leading research programs and working in the public sector can contribute to new perspectives to complement and raise the already very high level of academic excellence at Chalmers&quot;, says Sonia Yeh.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Sonia Yeh</strong> is a professor at Physical Resource Theory at the Department of Space, Earth and Environment at Chalmers University of Technology. Her fields of research centres on alternative transportation fuels, consumer behaviour, urban mobility and sustainability standards. Her research has made her an internationally recognized expert on energy economics and modulation of energy systems.</div> <div> </div> <div>Among other things she co-led a large collaborative team from the University of California Davis and UC Berkeley advising the U.S. states of California and Oregon, and British Columbia, Canada to design and implement a market-based carbon policy targeting GHG emission reductions from the transport sector.</div> <div> </div> <div>Sonia Yeh came to Chalmers as Adlerbertska visiting professor and U.S Fulbright Distinguished Chair Professor in Alternative Energy Technology to foster the exchange of transport research among the U.S, Sweden and the rest of Europe.</div> <div> </div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/Bio/IndBio/cecilia5q_340x400.jpg" alt="Cecilia Geijer" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" style="margin:5px;width:300px;height:348px" /><span></span><strong>”As the new senior advisor,</strong> I look forward to getting a greater insight into the structure and management of AoA Energy. There are lots of exciting energy research being conducted at Chalmers, and I hope to be able to contribute to the management team with my knowledge on microbial conversion of biomass into products for a circular bioeconomy,” says Cecilia Geijer.<br /><br /><strong>Cecilia Geijer </strong>is an Assistant Professor, at the Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Industrial Biotechnology.</div> <div>Her research focus is to develop yeast strains that can effectively ferment all the sugar in lignocellulose into sustainable biofuels and biochemicals in a future biorefinery. To understand how yeast best absorbs and metabolizes different sugars, she works with both industrial strains of the model organism S. cerevisiae as well as non-conventional yeast species with interesting biotechnological properties.</div> <div>Cecilia Geijer and her research group use the Nobel Prize-winning CRISPR-Cas9 technology to provide the bakery yeast with genes from other organisms, which also enables fermentation of other sugars from plant biomass and broadens the yeast's areas of use.</div> Wed, 20 Oct 2021 23:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/researchinfrastructure/oso/news/Pages/SKAO-Chalmers-agreement.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/researchinfrastructure/oso/news/Pages/SKAO-Chalmers-agreement.aspxKey role in the world's largest radio telescope project<p><b>​Chalmers will lead Sweden’s participation in the project to build the world's largest radio telescopes. At a ceremony held in Manchester and Gothenburg on September 30, 2021, a new agreement was signed between Chalmers and the intergovernmental organisation SKA Observatory. The agreement covers the next two years, giving time for Sweden to establish a formal membership in the international organisation.</b></p>​<span style="background-color:initial">The international SKA Observatory (SKAO) was established in early 2021. Its two vast telescopes, located at remote sites in South Africa and Australia, will together become one of this century’s most important scientific facilities. </span><div><br /><span style="background-color:initial"></span><div>“With the new agreement in place, Chalmers has a new, official role as leading Swedish interests in the construction of the SKA Observatory's giant telescopes. Funding for Swedish participation in the construction project is already secured, thanks to support from the Swedish Research Council and Vinnova”, says Lars Börjesson, board member of the SKAO.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>The two SKA telescopes are made up of many individual antennas, each sensitive to invisible radio waves from space. In total, 197 dish antennas will be placed in South Africa, forming a telescope for shorter wavelengths. Over 130 000 smaller antennas will make up the other telescope, located in Australia, sensitive to longer wavelength. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>Both will be able to map radio waves from the cosmos with unprecedented sensitivity. <span style="background-color:initial">The telescopes will investigate the mysteries of dark energy, dark matter, and cosmic magnetism, study how galaxies have</span><span style="background-color:initial"> </span><span style="background-color:initial">evolved</span><span style="background-color:initial">, test Einstein’s theories, and search for clues to the origins of life.</span></div> <div><br /></div> <div>“Scientists in Sweden and all over the world want to use the SKA telescopes to ask some of our biggest questions about the universe. <span style="background-color:initial">Membership in the SKA Observatory makes it possible for Swedish science and technology to be involved in building of these unique telescopes. It also ensures access to scientific data, and the chance to make exciting discoveries in astronomy and physics</span><span style="background-color:initial">”, explains John Conway.</span></div> <div><strong><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Centrum/Onsala%20rymdobservatorium/340x/ska_signing1_bengtsson_72dpi_340x340.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><br />Openings for industry</strong></div> <div><br /></div> <div>The new agreement means that Swedish companies are now eligible to tender for industrial contracts on equal terms as the SKAO’s current member countries. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>“This is a great opportunity for Sweden’s high-tech industries to get involved in a challenging and extremely exciting project”, says John Conway, director of Onsala Space Observatory and professor of radio astronomy at Chalmers.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>When the SKA telescopes are operational, they will generate data in quantities that make what today counts as &quot;big data&quot; look small. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>The new agreement also means a green light for the establishment in Sweden of one of SKAO's regional data processing centres. These centres are designed to handle the flood of data from SKA’s telescopes and supply final data products to astronomers.</div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Centrum/Onsala%20rymdobservatorium/340x/ska_signing3_zoom_72dpi_340x193.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><br /></div> <div><strong>Swedish tech opening new windows on the universe</strong></div> <div><br /></div> <div>The documents signed on 30 September 2021 by Stefan Bengtsson, Chalmers' president, and Philip Diamond, Director General of the SKA Observatory, give Chalmers the responsibility of representing Sweden in the project during the next two years. During that time, national processes will continue towards establishing Sweden as a member country of SKAO.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>“Sweden has been involved in the SKA project since the start. It’s wonderful to welcome Chalmers and Onsala Space Observatory in this new official role, just as building work is starting in South Africa and in Australia”, says Philip Diamond.</div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Centrum/Onsala%20rymdobservatorium/340x/ska_signing2_chalmers_72dpi_340x201.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><br /><span style="background-color:initial">“Before long, the SKA telescopes will begin to show us a whole new universe, giving scientists all over the world new discoveries and new challenges. When that happens, we can be proud of having supplied key Swedish technology to the project, technology with its roots right here at Chalmers and at Onsala Space Observatory”, says Stefan Bengtsson.</span><br /></div> <div> </div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>More about Sweden’s role in the SKA project</strong></div> <div><br /></div> <div>Onsala Space Observatory represented Swedish interests in the SKA design process between 2012 and 2021 as a member of the SKA Organization. </div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Centrum/Onsala%20rymdobservatorium/340x/SKA-Mid_wide_angle_72dpi_340x340.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><br />Chalmers and Swedish companies have made important contributions to the design and prototyping of the SKA telescopes, with the support of Big Science Sweden and working together with colleagues in Canada, France, India, Spain and South Africa.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><ul><li>The telescopes’ physically largest radio receivers, known as Band 1, have been designed and prototyped at Onsala Space Observatory. After a competitive procurement process, they will be manufactured by a Swedish company and a complete set delivered to SKAO's telescope in South Africa. </li> <li><span style="background-color:initial">Innovative low-noise amplifiers for Band 1 and for two other SKA receiver bands will supplied by the Gothenburg company Low Noise Factory, making use of the Chalmers MyFab clean room facility for the fabrication of core components.</span><br /></li> <li><span style="background-color:initial">The digital sampler design for the telescope in South Africa is now being finalised by the Gothenburg company Qamcom Research &amp; Technology AB. T</span>he digital samplers will also be manufactured by a Swedish company after a competitive procurement process.<br /></li></ul></div> <div><br /></div> <div>Swedish involvement in the SKAO is also opening new opportunities in data storage, machine learning and artificial intelligence. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>“At Onsala Space Observatory we’ve already started exploring these opportunities, working together Chalmers Fraunhofer Centre for Industrial Mathematics. That was demonstrated recently by an outstanding Swedish team performance in a recent international data challenge, applying machine learning to simulated SKA data”, says John Conway.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>More about the SKA Observatory and Onsala Space Observatory</strong></div> <div><br /></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">The SKAO, formally known as the SKA Observatory, is a global collaboration of Member States whose mission is to build and operate cutting-edge radio telescopes to transform our understanding of the Universe, and deliver benefits to society through global collaboration and innovation.</span><br /></div> <div><div><br /></div> <div>Headquartered in the UK, its two telescope arrays will be constructed in Australia and South Africa and be the two most advanced radio telescope networks on Earth. A later expansion is envisioned in both countries and other African partner countries. Together with other state-of-the-art research facilities, the SKAO’s telescopes will explore the unknown frontiers of science and deepen our understanding of key processes, including the formation and evolution of galaxies, fundamental physics in extreme environments and the origins of life. Through the development of innovative technologies and its contribution to addressing societal challenges, the SKAO will play its part to address the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals and deliver significant benefits across its membership and beyond.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>The SKAO recognises and acknowledges the Indigenous peoples and cultures that have traditionally lived on the lands on which the SKAO facilities are located.</div></div> <div><br /></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">Onsala Space Observatory is Sweden's national infrastructure for radio astronomy, hosted by the Department of Space, Earth and Environment at Chalmers University of Technology. The observatory provides researchers with equipment for the study of both the distant universe and of our earth. At Onsala, 45 km south of Gothenburg, the observatory operates four radio telescopes and a station in the international telescope Lofar. The SKA project is one of several international projects that the observatory participates in. Onsala Space Observatory receives funding from the Swedish Research Council and from the Swedish National Mapping Agency to support its activities in astronomy and geoscience, respectively.</span><br /></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><strong>Contacts</strong></div> <div><br /></div> <div>Robert Cumming, communicator, Onsala Space Observatory, Chalmers, tel: +46 31-772 5500 or +46 70 493 3114, robert.cumming@chalmers.se.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>John Conway, professor and infrastructure director, Onsala Space Observatory, Chalmers, +46 31-772 5500, john.conway@chalmers.se</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong><em>Images</em></strong></div> <div><strong><em><br /></em></strong></div> <div><em>A (top) - Nighttime composite image of the SKA combining all elements in South Africa and Australia. Credit: SKAO, ICRAR, SARAO / Acknowledgment: The GLEAM view of the centre of the Milky Way, in radio colour. Credit: Natasha Hurley-Walker (Curtin / ICRAR) and the GLEAM Team.</em></div> <div><em>Image credit: SKAO</em></div> <div><em></em></div> <div><em><br /></em></div> <div><div><em>B - At a ceremony on 30 September 2021, Stefan Bengtsson, president of Chalmers (foreground) and </em><em style="background-color:initial">Philip Diamond director general of the SKAO </em><em style="background-color:initial">(right, on screen</em><em style="background-color:initial">) </em><em style="background-color:initial">signed the new agreement between the SKAO and Chalmers. </em></div> <div><em style="background-color:initial">Image credit: Chalmers/R. Cumming</em></div> <div><em> </em></div> <div><div><em>C - The signing ceremony was held at the SKAO headquarters at Jodrell Bank, UK, and at Chalmers, with guests participating digitally. This screenshot shows Stefan Bengtsson and the Chalmers event (upper right) and professor Catherine Cesarsky, chair of the SKAO Board (below).</em></div> <div><em>Image credit: SKAO</em></div> <div><em><br /></em></div> <div><em></em></div></div> <div><em>D - The signing ceremony on 30 September 2021 in Gothenburg was attended by John Conway, director of Onsala Space Observatory, Lars Börjesson, board member of the SKAO, Stefan Bengtsson, president of Chalmers and Eva Wirström, division head for Onsala Space Observatory. </em></div> <div><em>Image credit: Chalmers/R. Cumming</em></div></div> <div><br /></div> <div><div><em>E –  This image shows an artist’s impression of the array of 197 dish antennas in South Africa. Of these 64 antennas (right half of image) are already in place in the form of the MeerKAT telescope. </em></div> <div><em>Image credit: SKAO</em></div></div> <div> </div> <div><br /></div></div> ​Thu, 07 Oct 2021 08:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/ict/news/Pages/Can-automated-fact-checkers-clean-up-the-mess.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/ict/news/Pages/Can-automated-fact-checkers-clean-up-the-mess.aspxCan automated fact-checkers clean up the mess?<p><b>​The dream of free dissemination of knowledge seems to be stranded in a swamp of tangled truth. Fake news proliferates. Digital echo chambers confirm biases. Even basic facts seem hard to be agreed upon. So is there hope in the battle to clean up this mess?  </b></p>​Yes! Many efforts are made within the Information and Communications Technology (ICT) research area to find software solutions. Learn more about it at our <span style="background-color:initial">morning session, focusing on automated fact-checking, both in research and practice.</span><div><div><div><br /></div> <div><b>DATE: </b>18 November 2021</div> <div><b>TIME: </b>09:45–12:00 CET</div> <div><b style="background-color:initial">LOCATION:</b><span style="background-color:initial"> Online or at Lingsalen, Studenternas Hus, Götabergsgatan 17 </span><span style="background-color:initial">​(Registration link below</span><span style="background-color:initial">). </span><br /></div> <div><em>Note! The physical seminar is only for students and staff at Chalmers and University of Gothenburg.</em></div> <div><br /></div> <div><div><a href="https://youtu.be/jWL9vHJeXW8" style="outline:0px"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />TECHNICAL PROBLEMS! No livestream today! We will record it and send afterwards. Check here for link later.​</a></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">You can send in questions by mail to <a href="mailto:ict@chalmers.se">ict@chalmers.se</a></span></div> <span style="background-color:initial"></span><div><br /><span style="background-color:initial"></span><div><div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">AGENDA​</h3> <div><div></div> <div><div><b>09:45 Introduction </b></div> <div><b>Erik Ström</b>, Director, Information and Communications Technology Area of Advance</div> <div><b>10:00 Looking for the truth in the post-truth era</b></div> <div><b>Ivan Koychev,</b> University of Sofia, Bulgaria. He gives a brief overview of automatically finding the claims and facts in texts along with confirmation or refutation.</div> <div><b>10:30 Computational Fact-Checking for Textual Claims</b></div> <div><b>Paolo Papotti,</b> Associate Professor, EURECOM, France. He will cover the opportunities and limitations of computational fact-checking and its role in fighting misinformation. He will also give examples from the &quot;infodemic&quot; associated with the COVID-19 pandemic.</div> <div><b>11:00 Pause</b></div> <div><b>11:10 Panel discussion. </b></div> <div><b>In the panel:</b></div> <div>Moderator <b>Graham Kemp</b>, professor, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Chalmers. </div> <div><b>Sheila Galt</b>, retired professor of Applied Electromagnetics, Chalmers. Engaged researcher in the Swedish Skeptics Association (Vetenskap och Folkbildning, VoF) for many years.</div> <div><b>Bengt Johansson</b>, professor in Journalism, University of Gothenburg. He has a strong focus on the field of media, power, and democracy. </div> <div><b>Jenny Wiik</b>, researcher and project leader for Media &amp; Democracy. Her research is looking into, e.g., automation of journalism. </div> <div>The keynotes, <b>Ivan Koychev</b> and <b>Paolo Papotti </b>are also part of the discussion.</div> <div><b>12:00 The end​</b></div></div> <div><b><br /></b></div> <div></div></div> <div><em>Chalmers ICT Area of Advance arranges this event as part of the Act Sustainable week.</em></div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="https://www.actsustainable.se/thursday21" target="_blank" title="link to the Act Sustainable website"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Read more and register</a> (at theAct Sustainable website)</div> <div><a href="https://www.actsustainable.se/thursday21" target="_blank" title="link to the Act Sustainable website"></a><a href="https://www.actsustainable.se/" target="_blank" title="Link to start page Act Sustainable website"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Read more about the Act Sustainable week​</a>​<br /></div></div></div> <div><br /></div></div></div></div></div> ​Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/Daniel-Gillblad-new-Director-of-Chalmers-AI-Research-Center.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/Daniel-Gillblad-new-Director-of-Chalmers-AI-Research-Center.aspxChalmers AI Research Center gets a new director<p><b>​On 1 October, Daniel Gillblad will begin his role as the new Director of Chalmers AI Research Center (CHAIR). He will take on the responsibility of leading the continued development of Chalmers’ cutting-edge capabilities within artificial intelligence, with the goal of driving world-leading research for the benefit of Swedish industry and the public sector. ​</b></p>​<span></span><span style="background-color:initial">Daniel Gillblad currently works as Co-Director Scientific Vision at Sweden’s national AI centre, AI Sweden. He has previously worked as a researcher, research leader and laboratory head at the Swedish Institute of Computer Science, SICS, as well as Head of AI research at </span>Research Institutes of Sweden,<span style="background-color:initial"> Rise. </span><div><br /></div> <div>”Daniel’s comprehensive expertise and experience will be a huge advantage for the continued work of integrating Chalmers’ AI research within national and international research initiatives, supporting our educational assignment in AI as well as encouraging innovation and commercialisation and developing our collaborations with industrial partners in AI,” says Stefan Bengtsson, President and CEO of Chalmers University of Technology.  </div> <div>Daniel Gillblad will begin his role as the new Director of CHAIR on </div> <div>1 October, while also continuing his work as Co-Director at Sweden’s national AI center, AI Sweden.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>“I am extremely glad to be given this opportunity as Director of CHAIR to work together with Chalmers researchers to develop future AI methods and applications. I am also greatly looking forward to further strengthening the connections between academia, industry and the public sector through my continued work with AI Sweden,” says Daniel Gillblad. </div> <div><br /></div> <div><em>Text: Ingrid Claesson</em></div> ​Wed, 29 Sep 2021 14:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/see/news/Pages/Chalmers-host-IDDRR.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/see/news/Pages/Chalmers-host-IDDRR.aspxHow do we reduce the risk of future disasters?<p><b>On October 13, UN's International Day for Disaster Risk Reduction, Chalmers is hosting the first International Risk Reduction seminar, an event which aims to promote a global culture of disaster reduction, including disaster prevention, mitigation and preparedness. </b></p><div><span style="background-color:initial">​</span><span style="background-color:initial">Internationa</span><span style="background-color:initial">l Day for Disaster Risk Reduction, IDDRR, began in 1989, after a call by the United Nations General Assembly</span><span style="background-color:initial">. Held every 13 October, the day celebrates how people and communities around the world are reducing their exposure to disasters and raising awareness about the importance of reining in the risks that they face. </span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">The first IDDRR international seminar 2021 is an </span><span style="background-color:initial">online event, hosted by Chalmers University of Technology, and will focus on disaster mechanisms and risk governance. The speaker list includes </span><span style="background-color:initial">Miriam Cullen, Copenhagen University, whose </span><span style="background-color:initial">research examines the connections between law and governance, and people displaced for climate-related reasons, and </span><span style="background-color:initial">Virginie Le Masson, University College London, researching </span><span style="background-color:initial">gender inequalities and violence-related risks in places affected by environmental changes and disasters. </span></div> <div><br /></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">– </span><span style="background-color:initial">2020/2021 with the Covid-19 pandemic as well as volcanic eruptions, wildfires, flooding, and hurricanes in various regions on the earth reminds us that human society, despite scientific advances and technological progress, is not free of being exposed to disasters, says Yiting Cai, PhD Student at the Department of Space, Earth and Environment at Chalmers. She is part of the organizing committee together with colleagues Rüdiger Haas and Maxime Mouyen, all at the division of Geoscience and Remote Sensing. </span><br /></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">– The International Day for Disaster Risk Reduction (IDDRR), </span><span style="background-color:initial"> is thus a perfect opportunity to raise awareness and to recall our exposure to various natural hazards, i.e. what we know about them and how we can mitigate their impact on human populations because e.g. earthquakes or floods will keep happening. </span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><strong>How come Chalmers is hosting this event? </strong></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">– According to the UN Agenda 2030 goals, disaster risk reduction is crucial for the sustainable development of human society, and sustainability is an important ingredient of Chalmers' vision, goals, and strategies.</span><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>What is your expectations on the IDDRR seminar? </strong></div> <div>– For this year's IDDRR Chalmers edition we will hear from specialists about threats and risks related to water, climate, environment, and earthquakes and get an overview of the new challenges and risk-mitigating methods in these fields. We expect this seminar will promote risk awareness and trigger research questions on disaster reduction among the audience.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="/en/departments/see/calendar/Pages/IDDRR-seminar.aspx">Click for full programme and speaker list​</a>. </div></span></div>Wed, 29 Sep 2021 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/centres/chair/news/Pages/Theme-Semesters.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/centres/chair/news/Pages/Theme-Semesters.aspxTheme Semesters<p><b>​In the call CHAIR Theme Semesters, Chalmers AI Research Centre wants to promote cross-discipline collaboration and opens for funding of a visiting research leader or a group of visiting researchers of the field for a duration of 1 to 3 months. ​</b></p><strong>​</strong><span lang="EN-US"><span><strong>Moritz Schauer, associate senior lecturer at Mathematical Sciences, is part of the working group that developed the call.</strong></span></span><span><strong> </strong></span><div><br /><span></span><div><span lang="EN-US"><span><em>What kind of collaboration and science is it that CHAIR hopes </em></span><span><em>come</em></span><span><em> out of the call?</em></span></span><span><em> </em></span><span><br /></span></div> <div><span><em><br /></em></span></div> <div><span lang="EN-US"><span>The vision is to seed cross-disciplinary research cooperation that is sustaining itself beyond the call, that requires creating interest and support the respective communities by opening new </span><span>perspectives,</span><span> but it doesn’t prescribe how that scientific cooperation should look like.</span></span></div> <div><span lang="EN-US"><span><br /></span></span></div> <div><span lang="EN-US"><span lang="EN-US"><span><em>Is the call for those developing AI as their main discipline or can AI be one of the tools for the research?</em></span></span><span><em> </em></span><span><br /></span></span></div> <div><span lang="EN-US"><span><em><br /></em></span></span></div> <div><span lang="EN-US"><span lang="EN-US"><span>The call is not restricted to researchers that only have AI as their field of interest</span><span>. O</span><span>n the contrary</span><span>,</span><span> we ask for projects of cross</span><span>-d</span><span>isciplinary nature with AI bringing the different parts together.</span></span></span></div> <div><span lang="EN-US"><span lang="EN-US"><span><br /></span></span></span></div> <div><span lang="EN-US"><span lang="EN-US"><span lang="EN-US"><span><em>How will the visiting research groups contribute to strengthening the AI research at Chalmers in general?</em></span></span><span><em> </em></span><span><br /></span></span></span></div> <div><span lang="EN-US"><span lang="EN-US"><span><em><br /></em></span></span></span></div> <div><span lang="EN-US"><span lang="EN-US"><span lang="EN-US"><span>The visiting researcher or visiting research group will lead this effort together with the local hosts/applicants.</span></span><span> </span><span><em><br /></em></span></span></span></div></div>Wed, 29 Sep 2021 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/see/news/Pages/The-space-industry-gathers-at-Chalmers.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/see/news/Pages/The-space-industry-gathers-at-Chalmers.aspxThe space industry gathers at Chalmers<p><b>​​On 10–12 October, actors from the space industry gather in Gothenburg for the conference Rymdforum – Space Forum 2021, w​here the latest research, technical achievements and Sweden's role in space will be discussed for two days. The space industry has a key role in terms of our ability to handle the climate challenge, environment and safety – and, among others, Swedish &quot;Minister of Space&quot;, Matilda Ernkrans participates.​</b></p><div><span style="background-color:initial">More and more authorities, companies and individuals in Sweden use space technology for everything from climate research, env​ironment and weather forecasts to agriculture, fishing and traffic planning. And the number of satellites in operation is expected to reach tens of thousands within the next ten years. In the latest budget bill, the government proposes an annual increase in the space budget by SEK 100 million. </span><span style="background-color:initial">In short – space is more important than ever. </span></div> <div><br /></div> <div>And large part of the Swedish space industry can be found in Western Sweden, in an industry whose importance has increased exponentially in recent years.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><ul><li>But how is the work with a lunar base for space travel going?</li> <li>What are Europe's space plans?</li> <li>What significance do future satelliteshave for the communication networks?</li> <li>How does space operations contribute to entrepreneurship and growth?</li> <li>How can space systems help achieve the goals of Agenda 2030?</li> <li>And will we ever find life on other planets?</li></ul></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">This and much more will be discussed at the conference Space Forum 2021.</span><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div>The theme for this year's Space Forum is &quot;Space in new era&quot;. Among the participants are Minister for Higher Education and Research, <span style="background-color:initial">Matilda Ernkrans, Director General of the Swedish Space Agency, Anna Rathsman, as well as a number of foreign and Swedish experts, researchers, politicians and business leaders. There is also an exhibition where most Swedish space companies exhibit.​</span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><a href="https://rymdforum2021.se/english/">Read the full programme at Rymdforum's official website</a>. </span></div>Wed, 29 Sep 2021 00:00:00 +0200