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First ever conference on Negative CO2 Emissions

​To save the planet, it is not enough that we simply reduce the amount of carbon dioxide emitted into the atmosphere in future. We need to actually lower the current overall level, by removing the man-made carbon dioxide that we have already produced. The challenges and possibilities of doing this are the focus of the first international ‘Negative CO2 Emissions’ conference, May 22-24 at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden. 
Chalmers Professor Anders Lyngfelt is one of the leaders behind the conference. Since 1998, his work has focused on developing methods for carbon dioxide capture, an endeavour which has seen him become one of the most respected and highly cited academics in his field. 

– I'm worried about the climate. If we are to achieve the goals, we need big negative emissions and it is obvious to us that, apart from eliminating carbon dioxide, we need to clean up after us, says Anders Lyngfelt.
The conference will feature oral and poster presentations from around 180 international experts in the field, including from USA, UK, Germany, China, Japan, and more. Attendees and speakers will be researchers, politicians and figures from industry. 

Among the keynote speakers will be the so-called ‘father of climate change awareness’, James Hansen. A former director of NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies, now Adjunct Professor at Columbia University, New York, James Hansen will open the conference with his talk ‘Negative CO2 emissions – why, when, and how much?’ 

Also of particular interest will be Tuesday’s session on ‘Bio Energy with Carbon Capture and Storage (BECCS) in Sweden and the rest of the Nordic countries’. BECCS has been suggested as a potentially major technology in the efforts to reduce overall CO2 levels, and the Nordic countries are well placed to make widespread use of this technology. Representatives from Chalmers, KTH, and other Swedish universities, as well as figures from industry and government will discuss the implications and role of BECCS in Swedish climate change policy. 
Chalmers researchers will also be joined by representatives from the Norwegian Ministry of Petroleum and Energy, the Norwegian environmental organisation Bellona, and the University of Copenhagen, to discuss the potential for BECCS technologies throughout the whole Nordic region. 

This session starts with an invited lecture by State Secretary for Climate Policy Eva Svedling, who will also open the conference together with the president and CEO of Chalmers, Stefan Bengtsson. 


Published: Mon 21 May 2018.