News: Space, Earth and Environment, Rymd- och geovetenskap, Energi och miljöhttp://www.chalmers.se/sv/nyheterNews related to Chalmers University of TechnologySat, 16 Oct 2021 06:47:42 +0200http://www.chalmers.se/sv/nyheterhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/see/news/Pages/Growth-of-solar-and-wind-power.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/see/news/Pages/Growth-of-solar-and-wind-power.aspxExpansion of wind and solar power too slow to stop climate change<p><b>​The production of renewable energy is increasing every year. But after analysing the growth rates of wind and solar power in 60 countries, researchers at Chalmers, Lund University and Central European University in Vienna, Austria conclude that virtually no country is moving sufficiently fast to avoid global warming of 1.5°C or even 2°C. &quot;This is the first time that the maximum growth rate in individual countries has been accurately measured, and it shows the enormous scale of the challenge of replacing traditional energy sources with renewables, as well as the need to explore diverse technologies and scenarios&quot;, says Jessica Jewell, Associate Professor in Energy Transitions at Chalmers University of Technology.</b></p>​The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has identified energy scenarios compatible with keeping global warming under 1.5°C or 2°C. Most of these scenarios envision very rapid growth of renewable electricity: on average   about 1.4 per cent of total global electricity supply per year for both wind and solar power, and over 3 per cent in more ambitious solar power scenarios. But the researchers’ new findings show that achieving such rapid growth has so far only been possible for a few countries.  <div><br /></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">Measuring and predicting the growth of new technologies like renewable energy is difficult, as they do not grow linearly. Instead, the growth usually follows a so-called S-curve. This means that when production of wind or solar power begins in a country it first accelerates exponentially, then stabilizes to linear growth for a while, and in the end slows down as the market becomes saturated.</span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/SEE/Nyheter/Jessica-Jewell-200.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" />&quot;Scholars typically assess technological growth by measuring how fast a given technology reaches market saturation. But for wind and solar power this method does not work, because we don’t know when and at what levels they will saturate. We came up with a new method: to use mathematical models to measure the slope of the S-curve, i.e. the maximum growth rate achieved at its steepest point. It is an entirely novel way to look at the growth of new technologies&quot;, says Jessica Jewell. </div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">Analysis of 60 countries</h3> <div>The researchers use these mathematical models to estimate the maximum growth rates achieved in the 60 largest countries which together produce ca 95% of the world’s electricity. They show that the average rate of onshore wind power growth achieved at the steepest point of the S-curves is 0.8% (with half of the countries falling within the 0.6-1.1% range) of the total electricity supply per year. For solar power, these estimates are somewhat lower: 0.6% on average (range 0.4-0.9%). </div> <div><br /></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">Higher rates, comparable to those required in climate scenarios, are indeed sometimes achieved, but typically in smaller countries. For example, wind power in Ireland expanded at some 2.6% per year while solar power in Chile has grown at 1.8% per year. However, fast growth is much rarer in larger countries. Among larger countries, only Germany has so far been able to sustain growth of wind power comparable with median climate scenarios (above 1.5% per year). </span><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/SEE/Nyheter/Aleh-Cherp-200.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" />&quot;In other words, to stay on track for climate targets, the whole world should build wind power as fast as Germany has recently&quot; says Aleh Cherp, a professor in Environmental Sciences and Policy at Central European University and Lund University. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>(As a side-note, Sweden has been growing wind power (including offshore) at about 1.6% per year in the last decade but this is at the upper end of the growth we observed in other countries.)</div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3"><span>​Why late adopter grow equally slow</span></h3> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span>To investigate future prospects of ren</span><span>ewables, the researchers have also compared th</span><span>eir growth in the pioneering countries (mostly in the European Union and other high-income industrialised nations) and in the rest of the world, where solar and wind power were introduced later. </span><span>The</span><span> latter group</span><span> includes most developing and emerging economies that would be responsible for the bulk of global energy use and thus need to deploy most of wind and solar power in the 21st century. It is hypothetically p</span><span>ossible that these countries could skip the trial-and-error stage which slowed down the early adopters, and thus leapfrog to higher growth rates. Unfortunately, the researchers discover that this is not the case. ​</span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span><br /></span></p> <div>&quot;There are usually reasons why they are late to enter the race. It can be because of vested interests, weaker institutions, and an investment environment that doesn’t support new technologies as well as from unsuitable geography. Those reasons have prevented renewable energy from taking off in the first place and make it especially difficult to replicate or exceed the growth rates achieved in leaders. Thus, we cannot automatically assume that the countries which introduce wind and solar power later would learn from prior experience and grow these technologies faster&quot;, says Cherp.</div> <div><br /></div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">Challenges for policy makers</h3> <div>The study highlights several policy challenges. One is for high-income countries to avoid the slowdown of solar and wind expansion, recently observed in several places. Another is for major Asian economies such as India and China to increase the growth rates so that renewables start growing faster than electricity demand and eventually push out fossil fuels. This can be achieved by widening the cost gap between renewables and the fossils, which include subsidies, phasing out or taxing competing technologies and supporting grid integration. </div> <div>&quot;Finally, we should recognize that there may be natural limits to how fast wind and solar can be expanded and thus we should systematically investigate the feasibility of other climate solutions&quot;, says Cherp.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><em>Text: Christian Löwhagen</em></div> <div><em>Image credits: Main photo: Pixabay. Jessica Jewell: Udo Schlög. Aleh Cherp: Johan Persson. </em></div> <div><br /></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">The article <a href="https://doi.org/10.1038/s41560-021-00863-0">National growth dynamics of wind and solar power compared to the growth required for global climate targets</a> was published in the journal Nature Energy, written by Cherp, A., Vinichenko, V., Tosun, J., Gordon, J. &amp; Jewell, J.. Nature Energy 6, 742–754 (2021). </span></div>Thu, 14 Oct 2021 13:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/researchinfrastructure/oso/news/Pages/SKAO-Chalmers-agreement.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/researchinfrastructure/oso/news/Pages/SKAO-Chalmers-agreement.aspxLeading the world's largest radio telescope project<p><b>​Chalmers will lead Sweden’s participation in the project to build the world's largest radio telescopes. At a ceremony held in Manchester and Gothenburg on September 30, 2021, a new agreement was signed between Chalmers and the intergovernmental organisation SKA Observatory. The agreement covers the next two years, giving time for Sweden to establish a formal membership in the international organisation.</b></p>​<span style="background-color:initial">The international SKA Observatory (SKAO) was established in early 2021. Its two vast telescopes, located at remote sites in South Africa and Australia, will together become one of this century’s most important scientific facilities. </span><div><br /><span style="background-color:initial"></span><div>“With the new agreement in place, Chalmers has a new, official role as leading Swedish interests in the construction of the SKA Observatory's giant telescopes. Funding for Swedish participation in the construction project is already secured, thanks to support from the Swedish Research Council and Vinnova”, says Lars Börjesson, board member of the SKAO.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>The two SKA telescopes are made up of many individual antennas, each sensitive to invisible radio waves from space. In total, 197 dish antennas will be placed in South Africa, forming a telescope for shorter wavelengths. Over 130 000 smaller antennas will make up the other telescope, located in Australia, sensitive to longer wavelength. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>Both will be able to map radio waves from the cosmos with unprecedented sensitivity. <span style="background-color:initial">The telescopes will investigate the mysteries of dark energy, dark matter, and cosmic magnetism, study how galaxies have</span><span style="background-color:initial"> </span><span style="background-color:initial">evolved</span><span style="background-color:initial">, test Einstein’s theories, and search for clues to the origins of life.</span></div> <div><br /></div> <div>“Scientists in Sweden and all over the world want to use the SKA telescopes to ask some of our biggest questions about the universe. <span style="background-color:initial">Membership in the SKA Observatory makes it possible for Swedish science and technology to be involved in building of these unique telescopes. It also ensures access to scientific data, and the chance to make exciting discoveries in astronomy and physics</span><span style="background-color:initial">”, explains John Conway.</span></div> <div><strong><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Centrum/Onsala%20rymdobservatorium/340x/ska_signing1_bengtsson_72dpi_340x340.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><br />Openings for industry</strong></div> <div><br /></div> <div>The new agreement means that Swedish companies are now eligible to tender for industrial contracts on equal terms as the SKAO’s current member countries. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>“This is a great opportunity for Sweden’s high-tech industries to get involved in a challenging and extremely exciting project”, says John Conway, director of Onsala Space Observatory and professor of radio astronomy at Chalmers.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>When the SKA telescopes are operational, they will generate data in quantities that make what today counts as &quot;big data&quot; look small. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>The new agreement also means a green light for the establishment in Sweden of one of SKAO's regional data processing centres. These centres are designed to handle the flood of data from SKA’s telescopes and supply final data products to astronomers.</div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Centrum/Onsala%20rymdobservatorium/340x/ska_signing3_zoom_72dpi_340x193.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><br /></div> <div><strong>Swedish tech opening new windows on the universe</strong></div> <div><br /></div> <div>The documents signed on 30 September 2021 by Stefan Bengtsson, Chalmers' president, and Philip Diamond, Director General of the SKA Observatory, give Chalmers the responsibility of representing Sweden in the project during the next two years. During that time, national processes will continue towards establishing Sweden as a member country of SKAO.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>“Sweden has been involved in the SKA project since the start. It’s wonderful to welcome Chalmers and Onsala Space Observatory in this new official role, just as building work is starting in South Africa and in Australia”, says Philip Diamond.</div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Centrum/Onsala%20rymdobservatorium/340x/ska_signing2_chalmers_72dpi_340x201.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><br /><span style="background-color:initial">“Before long, the SKA telescopes will begin to show us a whole new universe, giving scientists all over the world new discoveries and new challenges. When that happens, we can be proud of having supplied key Swedish technology to the project, technology with its roots right here at Chalmers and at Onsala Space Observatory”, says Stefan Bengtsson.</span><br /></div> <div> </div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>More about Sweden’s role in the SKA project</strong></div> <div><br /></div> <div>Onsala Space Observatory represented Swedish interests in the SKA design process between 2012 and 2021 as a member of the SKA Organization. </div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Centrum/Onsala%20rymdobservatorium/340x/SKA-Mid_wide_angle_72dpi_340x340.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><br />Chalmers and Swedish companies have made important contributions to the design and prototyping of the SKA telescopes, with the support of Big Science Sweden and working together with colleagues in Canada, France, India, Spain and South Africa.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><ul><li>The telescopes’ physically largest radio receivers, known as Band 1, have been designed and prototyped at Onsala Space Observatory. After a competitive procurement process, they will be manufactured by a Swedish company and a complete set delivered to SKAO's telescope in South Africa. </li> <li><span style="background-color:initial">Innovative low-noise amplifiers for Band 1 and for two other SKA receiver bands will supplied by the Gothenburg company Low Noise Factory, making use of the Chalmers MyFab clean room facility for the fabrication of core components.</span><br /></li> <li><span style="background-color:initial">The digital sampler design for the telescope in South Africa is now being finalised by the Gothenburg company Qamcom Research &amp; Technology AB. T</span>he digital samplers will also be manufactured by a Swedish company after a competitive procurement process.<br /></li></ul></div> <div><br /></div> <div>Swedish involvement in the SKAO is also opening new opportunities in data storage, machine learning and artificial intelligence. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>“At Onsala Space Observatory we’ve already started exploring these opportunities, working together Chalmers Fraunhofer Centre for Industrial Mathematics. That was demonstrated recently by an outstanding Swedish team performance in a recent international data challenge, applying machine learning to simulated SKA data”, says John Conway.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>More about the SKA Observatory and Onsala Space Observatory</strong></div> <div><br /></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">The SKAO, formally known as the SKA Observatory, is a global collaboration of Member States whose mission is to build and operate cutting-edge radio telescopes to transform our understanding of the Universe, and deliver benefits to society through global collaboration and innovation.</span><br /></div> <div><div><br /></div> <div>Headquartered in the UK, its two telescope arrays will be constructed in Australia and South Africa and be the two most advanced radio telescope networks on Earth. A later expansion is envisioned in both countries and other African partner countries. Together with other state-of-the-art research facilities, the SKAO’s telescopes will explore the unknown frontiers of science and deepen our understanding of key processes, including the formation and evolution of galaxies, fundamental physics in extreme environments and the origins of life. Through the development of innovative technologies and its contribution to addressing societal challenges, the SKAO will play its part to address the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals and deliver significant benefits across its membership and beyond.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>The SKAO recognises and acknowledges the Indigenous peoples and cultures that have traditionally lived on the lands on which the SKAO facilities are located.</div></div> <div><br /></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">Onsala Space Observatory is Sweden's national infrastructure for radio astronomy, hosted by the Department of Space, Earth and Environment at Chalmers University of Technology. The observatory provides researchers with equipment for the study of both the distant universe and of our earth. At Onsala, 45 km south of Gothenburg, the observatory operates four radio telescopes and a station in the international telescope Lofar. The SKA project is one of several international projects that the observatory participates in. Onsala Space Observatory receives funding from the Swedish Research Council and from the Swedish National Mapping Agency to support its activities in astronomy and geoscience, respectively.</span><br /></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><strong>Contacts</strong></div> <div><br /></div> <div>Robert Cumming, communicator, Onsala Space Observatory, Chalmers, tel: +46 31-772 5500 or +46 70 493 3114, robert.cumming@chalmers.se.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>John Conway, professor and infrastructure director, Onsala Space Observatory, Chalmers, +46 31-772 5500, john.conway@chalmers.se</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong><em>Images</em></strong></div> <div><strong><em><br /></em></strong></div> <div><em>A (top) - Nighttime composite image of the SKA combining all elements in South Africa and Australia. Credit: SKAO, ICRAR, SARAO / Acknowledgment: The GLEAM view of the centre of the Milky Way, in radio colour. Credit: Natasha Hurley-Walker (Curtin / ICRAR) and the GLEAM Team.</em></div> <div><em>Image credit: SKAO</em></div> <div><em></em></div> <div><em><br /></em></div> <div><div><em>B - At a ceremony on 30 September 2021, Stefan Bengtsson, president of Chalmers (foreground) and </em><em style="background-color:initial">Philip Diamond director general of the SKAO </em><em style="background-color:initial">(right, on screen</em><em style="background-color:initial">) </em><em style="background-color:initial">signed the new agreement between the SKAO and Chalmers. </em></div> <div><em style="background-color:initial">Image credit: Chalmers/R. Cumming</em></div> <div><em> </em></div> <div><div><em>C - The signing ceremony was held at the SKAO headquarters at Jodrell Bank, UK, and at Chalmers, with guests participating digitally. This screenshot shows Stefan Bengtsson and the Chalmers event (upper right) and professor Catherine Cesarsky, chair of the SKAO Board (below).</em></div> <div><em>Image credit: SKAO</em></div> <div><em><br /></em></div> <div><em></em></div></div> <div><em>D - The signing ceremony on 30 September 2021 in Gothenburg was attended by John Conway, director of Onsala Space Observatory, Lars Börjesson, board member of the SKAO, Stefan Bengtsson, president of Chalmers and Eva Wirström, division head for Onsala Space Observatory. </em></div> <div><em>Image credit: Chalmers/R. Cumming</em></div></div> <div><br /></div> <div><div><em>E –  This image shows an artist’s impression of the array of 197 dish antennas in South Africa. Of these 64 antennas (right half of image) are already in place in the form of the MeerKAT telescope. </em></div> <div><em>Image credit: SKAO</em></div></div> <div> </div> <div><br /></div></div> ​Thu, 07 Oct 2021 08:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/ict/news/Pages/Can-automated-fact-checkers-clean-up-the-mess.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/ict/news/Pages/Can-automated-fact-checkers-clean-up-the-mess.aspxCan automated fact checkers clean up the mess?<p><b>​The dream of free dissemination of knowledge seems to be stranded in a swamp of tangled truth. Fake news proliferates. Digital echo chambers confirm biases. Even basic facts seem hard to be agreed upon. Is there hope in the battle to clean up this mess?  </b></p>​Yes! Within the research area of information and communications technology (ICT) a lot of effort is made to find software solutions. As part of the<span style="background-color:initial"> Act Sustainable week, starting 15th of November, t</span><span style="background-color:initial">h</span><span style="background-color:initial">e ICT Area of Advance </span><span style="background-color:initial">invites you to a morning session with focus on automated fact-checking.​ </span><div><br /><span style="background-color:initial"></span><div><div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">AGENDA 18 November</h3> <div><div></div> <div><div><b>09:45 Introduction </b></div> <div><b>Erik Ström</b>, Director, Information and Communications Technology Area of Advance</div> <div><b>10:00 Looking for the truth in the post-truth era</b></div> <div><b>Ivan Koychev,</b> University of Sofia, Bulgaria. He will give a brief overview of how to automatically find the claims and facts in the text and how further to look for their confirmation or refutation.</div> <div><b>10:30 Computational Fact Checking for Textual Claims</b></div> <div><b>Paolo Papotti,</b> Associate Professor, EURECOM, France. He will cover the opportunities and limitations of computational fact checking and its role in fighting misinformation. He will also give examples from the &quot;infodemic&quot; associated with the COVID-19 pandemic.</div> <div><b>11:00 Pause</b></div> <div><b>11:10 Panel discussion</b></div> <div>Moderator <b>Graham Kemp</b>, professor, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Chalmers together with an invited panel.​ More info to come!</div> <div><b>12:00 The end​</b></div></div> <div><b><br /></b></div> <div></div></div> <div>Welcome to learn more about how to sort out some of the tangle!​</div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="https://www.actsustainable.se/thursday21" target="_blank" title="link to the Act Sustainable website"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Read more and register here</a></div> <div><a href="https://www.actsustainable.se/thursday21" target="_blank" title="link to the Act Sustainable website"></a><a href="https://www.actsustainable.se/" target="_blank" title="Link to start page Act Sustainable website"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Read more about the Act Sustainable week​</a>​<br /></div></div></div> <div><br /></div></div>Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/Daniel-Gillblad-new-Director-of-Chalmers-AI-Research-Center.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/Daniel-Gillblad-new-Director-of-Chalmers-AI-Research-Center.aspxChalmers AI Research Center gets a new director<p><b>​On 1 October, Daniel Gillblad will begin his role as the new Director of Chalmers AI Research Center (CHAIR). He will take on the responsibility of leading the continued development of Chalmers’ cutting-edge capabilities within artificial intelligence, with the goal of driving world-leading research for the benefit of Swedish industry and the public sector. ​</b></p>​<span></span><span style="background-color:initial">Daniel Gillblad currently works as Co-Director Scientific Vision at Sweden’s national AI centre, AI Sweden. He has previously worked as a researcher, research leader and laboratory head at the Swedish Institute of Computer Science, SICS, as well as Head of AI research at </span>Research Institutes of Sweden,<span style="background-color:initial"> Rise. </span><div><br /></div> <div>”Daniel’s comprehensive expertise and experience will be a huge advantage for the continued work of integrating Chalmers’ AI research within national and international research initiatives, supporting our educational assignment in AI as well as encouraging innovation and commercialisation and developing our collaborations with industrial partners in AI,” says Stefan Bengtsson, President and CEO of Chalmers University of Technology.  </div> <div>Daniel Gillblad will begin his role as the new Director of CHAIR on </div> <div>1 October, while also continuing his work as Co-Director at Sweden’s national AI center, AI Sweden.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>“I am extremely glad to be given this opportunity as Director of CHAIR to work together with Chalmers researchers to develop future AI methods and applications. I am also greatly looking forward to further strengthening the connections between academia, industry and the public sector through my continued work with AI Sweden,” says Daniel Gillblad. </div> <div><br /></div> <div><em>Text: Ingrid Claesson</em></div> ​Wed, 29 Sep 2021 14:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/see/news/Pages/Chalmers-host-IDDRR.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/see/news/Pages/Chalmers-host-IDDRR.aspxHow do we reduce the risk of future disasters?<p><b>On October 13, UN's International Day for Disaster Risk Reduction, Chalmers is hosting the first International Risk Reduction seminar, an event which aims to promote a global culture of disaster reduction, including disaster prevention, mitigation and preparedness. </b></p><div><span style="background-color:initial">​</span><span style="background-color:initial">Internationa</span><span style="background-color:initial">l Day for Disaster Risk Reduction, IDDRR, began in 1989, after a call by the United Nations General Assembly</span><span style="background-color:initial">. Held every 13 October, the day celebrates how people and communities around the world are reducing their exposure to disasters and raising awareness about the importance of reining in the risks that they face. </span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">The first IDDRR international seminar 2021 is an </span><span style="background-color:initial">online event, hosted by Chalmers University of Technology, and will focus on disaster mechanisms and risk governance. The speaker list includes </span><span style="background-color:initial">Miriam Cullen, Copenhagen University, whose </span><span style="background-color:initial">research examines the connections between law and governance, and people displaced for climate-related reasons, and </span><span style="background-color:initial">Virginie Le Masson, University College London, researching </span><span style="background-color:initial">gender inequalities and violence-related risks in places affected by environmental changes and disasters. </span></div> <div><br /></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">– </span><span style="background-color:initial">2020/2021 with the Covid-19 pandemic as well as volcanic eruptions, wildfires, flooding, and hurricanes in various regions on the earth reminds us that human society, despite scientific advances and technological progress, is not free of being exposed to disasters, says Yiting Cai, PhD Student at the Department of Space, Earth and Environment at Chalmers. She is part of the organizing committee together with colleagues Rüdiger Haas and Maxime Mouyen, all at the division of Geoscience and Remote Sensing. </span><br /></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">– The International Day for Disaster Risk Reduction (IDDRR), </span><span style="background-color:initial"> is thus a perfect opportunity to raise awareness and to recall our exposure to various natural hazards, i.e. what we know about them and how we can mitigate their impact on human populations because e.g. earthquakes or floods will keep happening. </span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><strong>How come Chalmers is hosting this event? </strong></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">– According to the UN Agenda 2030 goals, disaster risk reduction is crucial for the sustainable development of human society, and sustainability is an important ingredient of Chalmers' vision, goals, and strategies.</span><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>What is your expectations on the IDDRR seminar? </strong></div> <div>– For this year's IDDRR Chalmers edition we will hear from specialists about threats and risks related to water, climate, environment, and earthquakes and get an overview of the new challenges and risk-mitigating methods in these fields. We expect this seminar will promote risk awareness and trigger research questions on disaster reduction among the audience.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="/en/departments/see/calendar/Pages/IDDRR-seminar.aspx">Click for full programme and speaker list​</a>. </div></span></div>Wed, 29 Sep 2021 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/centres/chair/news/Pages/Theme-Semesters.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/centres/chair/news/Pages/Theme-Semesters.aspxTheme Semesters<p><b>​In the call CHAIR Theme Semesters, Chalmers AI Research Centre wants to promote cross-discipline collaboration and opens for funding of a visiting research leader or a group of visiting researchers of the field for a duration of 1 to 3 months. ​</b></p><strong>​</strong><span lang="EN-US"><span><strong>Moritz Schauer, associate senior lecturer at Mathematical Sciences, is part of the working group that developed the call.</strong></span></span><span><strong> </strong></span><div><br /><span></span><div><span lang="EN-US"><span><em>What kind of collaboration and science is it that CHAIR hopes </em></span><span><em>come</em></span><span><em> out of the call?</em></span></span><span><em> </em></span><span><br /></span></div> <div><span><em><br /></em></span></div> <div><span lang="EN-US"><span>The vision is to seed cross-disciplinary research cooperation that is sustaining itself beyond the call, that requires creating interest and support the respective communities by opening new </span><span>perspectives,</span><span> but it doesn’t prescribe how that scientific cooperation should look like.</span></span></div> <div><span lang="EN-US"><span><br /></span></span></div> <div><span lang="EN-US"><span lang="EN-US"><span><em>Is the call for those developing AI as their main discipline or can AI be one of the tools for the research?</em></span></span><span><em> </em></span><span><br /></span></span></div> <div><span lang="EN-US"><span><em><br /></em></span></span></div> <div><span lang="EN-US"><span lang="EN-US"><span>The call is not restricted to researchers that only have AI as their field of interest</span><span>. O</span><span>n the contrary</span><span>,</span><span> we ask for projects of cross</span><span>-d</span><span>isciplinary nature with AI bringing the different parts together.</span></span></span></div> <div><span lang="EN-US"><span lang="EN-US"><span><br /></span></span></span></div> <div><span lang="EN-US"><span lang="EN-US"><span lang="EN-US"><span><em>How will the visiting research groups contribute to strengthening the AI research at Chalmers in general?</em></span></span><span><em> </em></span><span><br /></span></span></span></div> <div><span lang="EN-US"><span lang="EN-US"><span><em><br /></em></span></span></span></div> <div><span lang="EN-US"><span lang="EN-US"><span lang="EN-US"><span>The visiting researcher or visiting research group will lead this effort together with the local hosts/applicants.</span></span><span> </span><span><em><br /></em></span></span></span></div></div>Wed, 29 Sep 2021 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/see/news/Pages/The-space-industry-gathers-at-Chalmers.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/see/news/Pages/The-space-industry-gathers-at-Chalmers.aspxThe space industry gathers at Chalmers<p><b>​​On 10–12 October, actors from the space industry gather in Gothenburg for the conference Rymdforum – Space Forum 2021, w​here the latest research, technical achievements and Sweden's role in space will be discussed for two days. The space industry has a key role in terms of our ability to handle the climate challenge, environment and safety – and, among others, Swedish &quot;Minister of Space&quot;, Matilda Ernkrans participates.​</b></p><div><span style="background-color:initial">More and more authorities, companies and individuals in Sweden use space technology for everything from climate research, env​ironment and weather forecasts to agriculture, fishing and traffic planning. And the number of satellites in operation is expected to reach tens of thousands within the next ten years. In the latest budget bill, the government proposes an annual increase in the space budget by SEK 100 million. </span><span style="background-color:initial">In short – space is more important than ever. </span></div> <div><br /></div> <div>And large part of the Swedish space industry can be found in Western Sweden, in an industry whose importance has increased exponentially in recent years.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><ul><li>But how is the work with a lunar base for space travel going?</li> <li>What are Europe's space plans?</li> <li>What significance do future satelliteshave for the communication networks?</li> <li>How does space operations contribute to entrepreneurship and growth?</li> <li>How can space systems help achieve the goals of Agenda 2030?</li> <li>And will we ever find life on other planets?</li></ul></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">This and much more will be discussed at the conference Space Forum 2021.</span><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div>The theme for this year's Space Forum is &quot;Space in new era&quot;. Among the participants are Minister for Higher Education and Research, <span style="background-color:initial">Matilda Ernkrans, Director General of the Swedish Space Agency, Anna Rathsman, as well as a number of foreign and Swedish experts, researchers, politicians and business leaders. There is also an exhibition where most Swedish space companies exhibit.​</span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><a href="https://rymdforum2021.se/english/">Read the full programme at Rymdforum's official website</a>. </span></div>Wed, 29 Sep 2021 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/centres/chair/news/Pages/X-AI.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/centres/chair/news/Pages/X-AI.aspxX+AI<p><b>​With the new Chalmers initiative, CHAIR aims to establish an instrument that allows Chalmers-based researcher in any field (X) with a strong international standing to develop an environment that leverages AI to reach global excellence. ​​</b></p><strong>​</strong><span lang="EN-US"><span><strong>Karinne</strong></span><span><strong> Ramirez-Amaro, Assistant Professor at Electrical Engineering, is part of the working group that developed the call. <br /><br /></strong></span></span><div><span lang="EN-US"><span lang="EN-US"><span><em>What kind of collaboration and science is it that CHAIR hopes come out of the call?</em></span></span><span><em> <br /></em></span><span><strong><br /></strong></span></span></div> <div><span lang="EN-US"><span lang="EN-US"><span>This call aims to find one or more research topics (X) that can be combined with AI in a way that unifies and excites excellent research groups at Chalmers. We encourage a multi-disciplinary collaboration to find synergistic connections of different research topics (X) that can benefit from AI methods by assembling teams with internal, national, international, or industrial partners.</span></span><span> </span><span><em><br /></em></span></span></div> <div><span lang="EN-US"><span lang="EN-US"><span><em><br />Is the call for those developing AI as their main discipline or can AI be one of the tools for the research?</em></span></span><span><em> <br /></em></span><span><br /></span></span></div> <div><span lang="EN-US"><span lang="EN-US"><span>Both cases are encouraged to apply. One of the main goals of this new call is to support the creation or development of consortia that can potentially lead to novel project applications.</span></span><span> </span><span><em><br /></em></span></span></div> <div><span lang="EN-US"><span><br /></span></span></div> <div><span lang="EN-US"><span lang="EN-US"><span><em>How great is the potential for Chalmers researchers to develop unique collaborations between AI-researchers and non-AI researchers? What do you hope it will lead to?</em></span></span><span><em> <br /></em></span><span><br /></span></span></div> <div><span lang="EN-US"><span lang="EN-US"><span>We expect that this new grant can he​lp researchers to create new networks or to participate in existing ones focusing on areas/problems that can greatly benefit from developing and applying AI methods. </span></span><span><em><br /></em></span></span></div>Tue, 28 Sep 2021 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/centres/chair/news/Pages/Call-CHAIR-Theme-Semesters.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/centres/chair/news/Pages/Call-CHAIR-Theme-Semesters.aspxCall CHAIR Theme Semesters<p><b>​CHAIR Theme Semesters is a programme designed to bring together Chalmers researchers from different disciplines under a common theme to jointly advance fundamental problems in AI/machine learning: led by a visiting researcher leader or a group of visiting researchers of the field for a duration of 1 to 3 months.</b></p>​<span>We are looking for</span><span> </span><span>applications by </span><span>a</span><span>n interdisciplinary</span><span> consortium of</span><span> three</span><span> to </span><span>five</span><span> researchers </span><span>at Chalmers (and common GU </span><span>d</span><span>epartments)</span><span> with common focal interest in AI/machine learning </span><span>to </span><span>work for</span><span> </span><span>for the duration </span><span>together on a jointly agreed research programme. </span><span>A dedicated physical working space </span><span>is</span><span> available in collaboration with AI Innovation of Sweden</span><span>.</span><span> </span><span>The </span><span>researchers would be expected to interact together intensively on a daily basis.<br /><br /></span><div></div> <div><div><span>The consortium nominates and invites an</span><span> internationally recognized research leader in AI/machine learning or a group of internationally recognized rising stars</span><span> to be funded and hosted at Chalmers and to </span><span>scientifically</span><span> lead the theme semester </span><span>together with the local consortium of Chalmers researchers. The international researcher(s) would spend this period hosted by Chalmers. During the theme semester,</span><span> </span><span>10-15 </span><span>external researchers will be hosted </span><span>at Chalmers to participate in seminars, workshops and open events (</span><span>we encourage people to stay for at least one week</span><span>)</span><span>. The thematic programs are envisioned to attract a broad range of scientists, from different fields, with AI as a focal point and to be arranged such that there are close interactions between the involved scientists.</span><span> We expect that the local consortium will continue the initiated collaboration after the theme semester and build long term research efforts.</span></div> <div><br /></div> <div><span>It is also expected that</span><span> outreach activities</span><span> such as a day of talks aimed at the general public</span><span> are</span><span> arranged during the period that the theme semester runs. </span><span>CHAIR's Ethical Policy (</span><span><a href="/en/centres/chair/research/Pages/Ethical-policy.aspx" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer nofollow">https://www.chalmers.se/en/centres/chair/research/Pages/Ethical-policy.aspx</a></span><span>)</span><span> shall be regarded during the semester</span><span>. <br /><br /></span></div> <div><div><span>Each project will be supported by a budget of </span><span>up to</span><span> 600 k SEK</span><span>. It will be left up to the team of coordinating researchers at Chalmers to spend the budget as they see fit. </span><span>The budget</span><span> may be used for supporting travel, local accommodation of visitors </span><span>and</span><span> also to pay a salary </span><span>component or honorarium </span><span>to the international theme leader</span><span>(s). However, no more than 10% of the budget can be used for salary for the local researchers at Chalmers.  There may be a light check on how the budget is proposed to be used and minor adjustments may be suggested by the CHAIR management.</span></div> <div><span><br /></span></div> <div><div><span><strong>Call for Proposals and Nomination of a Distinguished Research Leader</strong></span></div> <div><div><span>We invite proposals from a consortium of researchers at Chalmers and GU for AI Theme Semesters.  This proposal should include a nomination of an internationally distinguished research leader in</span><span> </span><span>AI/machine learning or a group of rising stars.  </span><span>We are looking for nominees with an outstanding scientific track record. There is no particular age bracket to be considered. </span></div> <div><br /></div> <div><span>The nomination should contain:</span></div> <ul><li><span>A cover letter (of at most 3 pages)  outlining the research programme for theme semester</span><span> </span></li> <li><span>A</span><span> two-page CV of the international researcher</span><span>(s) </span><span> together with list of publications (and preferably a researcher ID such as ORCID).</span></li> <li><span>P</span><span>ropose, and shortly justify, a budge</span><span>t</span><span> total </span><span>up to 600 k SEK</span><span> (maximum 1/2 of a page). </span></li> <li><span>A</span><span> letter of intent from the nominee</span><span>(s) </span><span> stating the time period </span><span>they </span><span>will be present in Gothenburg. </span><span>(Note: only one letter of intent from the </span><span>main visiting researche</span><span>r </span><span>(rather than all participants) is required)</span></li> <li><span>Ethical aspects of the programme, in keeping with CHAIR's Ethical Policy, should also be addressed in the application. </span></li></ul> <div><span>The proposals will be evaluated and selected by the Management </span><span>Group</span><span> of CHAIR. </span></div> <div><br /></div> <div><span>There is the possibility to get CHAIR core partners </span><span>(</span><span><a href="/en/centres/chair/consortium/Pages/default.aspx" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer nofollow">https://www.chalmers.se/en/centres/chair/consortium/Pages/default.aspx</a></span><span>)</span><span> involved in the project, giving the visiting researcher and the group a chance to work on problems together with partners, and also benefit from data, while the partners benefit from the research, and can contribute to the project.  </span></div> <div><br /></div> <div><span>Complementary funding and activities could also be arranged together with GENIE if the theme is led by female researcher(s).</span></div> <div><span><br /></span></div> <div><div><span><strong>Mandatory Requirements:</strong></span><span><strong> </strong></span></div> <ul><li><span>AI should be the focal point of the proposal.</span></li> <li><span>T</span><span>he consortium submitting the proposal shou</span><span>l</span><span>d consist of at least three PIs </span><span>from Chalmers</span><span> from at least </span><span>three</span><span> different local departments.</span><span> We also encourage additional external PIs</span><span> </span><span>from e.g. GU, industry partners or the  CHAIR consortium.</span></li></ul> <div><span><strong><br />Ev</strong></span><span><strong>aluation criteria: </strong></span></div> <ul><li><span>AI as the focal point</span><span> of the proposal</span><span>.</span></li> <li><span>Novelty and originality</span><span>.</span></li> <li><span>Scientific quality of the proposed research</span><span>.</span></li> <li><span>Merits of the nominee</span><span>s.</span></li> <li><span>Feasibility - prior experience of coordinating larger projects or networks is thus an advantage</span><span>.</span></li> <li><span>Cross-disciplinary </span><span>nature</span><span> of the project. </span></li> <li><span>Added value for the extended research community at Chalmers</span><span>.</span></li> <li><span>Ability to continue with the cooperation after the project completion</span><span>.</span></li></ul> <div><br /></div> <div><span><strong>Important dates</strong></span><span><strong> and submission:</strong></span></div> <ul><li><span>Submission due : 15 November, 2021</span></li> <li><span>N</span><span>otification: </span><span>December 20, 2021</span></li> <li><span>Project start: </span><span>2022</span></li> <li><span>Project end: </span><span>December 31, 2022</span></li></ul> <div><br /></div> <div><span> Informal enquiries can be sent to Rebecka Jörnsten (</span><span><a href="mailto:jornsten@chalmers.se">jornsten@chalmers.se​</a></span><span>). </span></div> <div><br /></div> <div><span>The proposals should be submitted as one PDF file consisting of the above-mentioned parts.  The proposal should be submitted via this channel </span><span><a href="https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=chaits2021" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer nofollow">Submit your PDF proposal to Easychair​</a>.</span></div> <div></div> <span></span></div> <div></div> <span><strong></strong></span></div> <div></div> <span></span></div> <div></div> <span></span></div> <span></span></div> ​​Tue, 14 Sep 2021 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/centres/chair/news/Pages/Call-for-projects-CHAIR-X---AI-Project-Plan.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/centres/chair/news/Pages/Call-for-projects-CHAIR-X---AI-Project-Plan.aspxCall for projects: CHAIR X + AI<p><b>With the new X+AI initiative, CHAIR aims to establish an instrument that allows Chalmers-based researchers in any field (X) with a strong international standing to develop an environment that leverages AI to reach global excellence. The goal of this new CHAIR X+AI grant is to support the development of consortia that can potentially lead to new project applications, create new networks or participate in existing ones.</b></p><strong>​</strong><span><strong>We invite team leaders</strong> to apply for the new CHAIR X+AI grants and submit their strong applications which should fulfill the following criteria:</span><ol type="1"><li><span lang="EN-US">The main PI should be an employee from Chalmers. External partners are allowed to participate but cannot be direct beneficiaries of this grant.</span></li> <li><span lang="EN-US">Establishes synergistic and unusual connections of X to AI with internal, national, international, or industrial partners.</span></li> <li><span lang="EN-US">Explores promising synergies between X and AI, to achieve goals that can only be possible by working together.</span></li> <li><span lang="EN-US">Enable concrete discussions between X and AI, and build a collaborative environment.</span></li> <li><span lang="EN-US">Identifies and aligns resources and needs to facilitate effective connection of X and AI.</span></li></ol> <p><span lang="EN-US"> </span></p> <p><strong>Budget and instrument details:<br /></strong></p> <ol type="1"><li><span lang="EN-US">We aim to fund 2-3 projects with budgets between 300 kSEK to 750 kSEK. The total budget for this call is 1.5 MSEK. Budgets can be used freely for salaries, travel, consumables, etc. However, larger budget allocations (&gt;50 kSEK) should be clearly justified in the application text.</span></li> <li><span>​​​Outcome: A final project report should be delivered and presented (could also include a video, presentation, etc.) describing the outcome and a plan for upscaling, e.g. grant applications, partner in consortiums, coordination of consortiums etc. </span><span>The scope of the final report is 5 pages.</span></li></ol> <div><strong><br /></strong></div> <div><strong>Deadline for call: Nov 15th, 2021</strong></div> <div><p><span lang="EN-US">The application should be maximum 3 pages long, font Times–roman, size 11. In addition, max 1 page can be used for references. Also, two- page CV of the main applicants should be included (max 4 CVs).</span></p> <p><span lang="EN-US"> </span></p> <p><span><strong>The proposal should include:</strong></span></p> <strong> </strong><ol type="1"><li><span lang="EN-US">T</span><span lang="EN-US">he project acronym and the project title (does not count towards 3 page limit)</span></li> <ol type="a"><li><span lang="EN-US">name, e-mail, of the project applicants (PIs)</span></li></ol> <li><span lang="EN-US">Current status and expected outcome from this newly developed connection.</span><span lang="EN-US"></span></li> <ol type="a"><li><span lang="EN-US">Why should research area X be combined with AI? - why is this connection/synergy important to advance the state-of-the-art?</span><span lang="EN-US"></span></li> <li><span lang="EN-US">Explain the scope of the new and potential synergies of the proposed network.            </span></li></ol> <li><span lang="EN-US">Implementation plan for synergy of</span><span lang="EN-US"> X + AI at Chalmers </span><span lang="EN-US">(workshops, visits, proposals, consortia, and networks)</span><span lang="EN-US"></span></li> <li><span lang="EN-US">E</span><span lang="EN-US">thical aspects </span><span lang="EN-US">and Diversity and inclusion strategy </span><span lang="EN-US">of the project (e.g. </span><span lang="EN-US">age, gender, seniority level, etc.</span><span lang="EN-US">)</span></li> <li><span>B</span><span>enefits for Chalmers</span></li> <li><span>Project partners</span><span></span></li> <li><span>Project budget</span><span></span></li></ol> <div><br /></div> <div><p><strong>Main evaluation criteria:</strong></p> <ol type="1"><li><span lang="EN-US">Establish the connections between X and AI (during grant application: internal, national, international, or industry)</span></li> <li><span lang="EN-US">Explore potential synergies between X and AI (more details, planning for grant applications, conceptualizing concrete ideas)</span></li> <li><span lang="EN-US">Enable Discussions between X and AI (ensure commitment or time)</span></li> <li><span lang="EN-US">Innovative explorations -- unusual partners -- and their potentials</span></li> <li><span lang="EN-US">Identifying and Aligning the resources to expertises to connect X and AI?</span></li></ol> <div><strong><br /></strong></div> <div><strong>Submission:</strong></div></div></div> <div><div>The application should be submitted as one PDF document to:<br /><a href="https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=caix2021" target="_blank">https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=caix2021</a><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><span style="font-weight:700">General questions about the call can be addressed to:</span><br /></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">Fredrik Kahl, <a href="mailto:fredrik.kahl@chalmers.se">fredrik.kahl@chalmers.se​</a>, CHAIR management group</span><a href="mailto:ivica.crnkovic@chamers.se%E2%80%8B">​</a></div></div>Sun, 12 Sep 2021 10:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/see/news/Pages/New-climate-course.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/see/news/Pages/New-climate-course.aspxNew course offers a holistic approach to the climate<p><b>​Climate change is in focus for a new new open evening course Chalmers in the spring of 2022: &quot;The climate – science, measures, policy instruments&quot;. The course will address the climate as a system, how humans and the climate affect each other, and what technical and political ways there are to reduce our climate impact.– For those of us who work with these issues, the climate is always relevant and has been for a long time. And after IPCC, the UN climate panel, recently established the human impact and the urgency of the matter, it has become an incredibly relevant issue, says Erik Ahlgren, course coordinator.</b></p>​<span style="background-color:initial">The fact that the issue of climate change is highly topical is also one of the reasons why the course will be given to those who have general admission requirements, without special prior knowledge. This will make course eligible to a wider target group than those who study at Chalmers.</span><div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/EoM/Profilbilder/erik_ahlgren2_170x220.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" />– In the preparatory work, we have discussed sev</span><span style="background-color:initial">eral specific target groups, such as high school (gymnasium) teachers, journalists and politicians, but these are issues that engage many different groups. It will be exciting for us researchers and teachers to go outside our comfort zone, beyond Chalmers students, says course coordinator Erik Ahlgren, assistant professor in energy systems at the Department of Space, Earth and Environment at Chalmers, where all teachers of the course are based.</span></div> <div><br /><div>– At our department, there is a broad competence in these issues that we now look forward to gathering for the first time in one course. A challenge will be to find the right level when presenting physical and chemical mechanisms, as well as create an understanding of complicated systems and contexts.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Those who take the course will get an introduction to the climate as a system, how humans have affected the climate and how a changed climate with rising temperatures affects land, water and ecosystems. The course will also address which measures we can take to reduce our emissions, with a focus on technical solutions in energy, transport, industry and land use as well as what types of policy instruments are relevant.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>As course coordinator and examiner, one of Erik's main tasks is to bring the whole together and to create a common thread through the research areas that will emerge during the course.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>– It is fantastically exciting to work with such a different course, which runs across our various research disciplines. The goal is to create an entirety that shows where science stands today in the various areas, says Erik Ahlgren.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/SEE/Profilbilder/Kristell_Perot_170.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" />Kristell Pérot, associate professor at the department of earth sciences and remote sensing, is one of the teachers who teaches early in the course.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>– I will give an introduction to research on climate change. My goal – together with the other researchers in my department – will be to explain the physics behind the climate system: How the earth's energy balance and the circulation between the atmosphere and the oceans work and how the balance is disturbed by emissions that we humans have caused. I believe that a basic understanding of the climate system is an important first step in understanding how our lives and the environment can be affected by the changes in the system and how we can behave to meet this societal challenge, says Kristell Pérot.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>She also thinks that it is important to inform a broad target group about these issues, partly because climate change is the biggest threat that humans have faced and partly because we live in a time when incorrect information is spreading rapidly.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>– I am looking forward to seeing who the people taking this course are and what their motivations are. I hope that they will come out of the course more knowledgeable and more motivated to act on climate change, and that they will spread their new knowledge to other people in the public society, Kristell concludes.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><em>Text: Christian Löwhagen</em></div> <div><em><br /></em></div> <div><span style="color:rgb(33, 33, 33);font-family:inherit;font-size:16px;font-weight:600;background-color:initial">Read​ more</span><br /></div> <div><a href="/sv/utbildning/vidareutbildning/Sidor/Fristaende-kurser-VT.aspx">The practical course and application info is in Swedish only​</a>. The course &quot;Climate – science, measures, policy instruments&quot;, is 7.5 credits and is given in Swedish between January and May 2022. It must be given at a distance in the evening. The teachers come from the departments of Energy Technology, Physical Resource Theory and Geoscience and Remote Sensing at the Department of Space, Geo- and Environmental Sciences. The course is at the undergraduate level and requires only basic eligibility for higher education. It can accommodate a maximum of 150 students.</div> </div>Thu, 09 Sep 2021 14:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/energy/news/Pages/Utilization-in-focus-for-the-new-Director-for-Energy-Area-of-Advance.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/energy/news/Pages/Utilization-in-focus-for-the-new-Director-for-Energy-Area-of-Advance.aspxUtilization in focus for the new Director for Energy Area of Advance<p><b>​Tomas Kåberger is the new Director of Chalmers Energy Area of Advance. He took office on 1 September.– It feels so good to hand over to Tomas, he has the knowledge, experience and network in the society and industry to pursue strategic sustainability issues that benefit societal development, says Maria Grahn who is now leaving the assignment.</b></p>​<img src="/sv/styrkeomraden/energi/PublishingImages/Tomas_Kåberger_4_Highrez.jpg" alt="Tomas Kåberger" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" style="margin:5px 10px;width:350px;height:337px" /><span style="background-color:initial"><strong>Tomas Kåberger's</strong> hallmark is to drive change from different platforms. So what does the vision look like when you now take on this task?</span><div>– The world's energy supply is developing rapidly and research results and new technology are valuable. Chalmers’ researchers have a lot to offer and I want to help in making this knowledge useful, says Tomas Kåberger, who is reinstated professor of Industrial Energy Policy at Chalmers University of Technology.<br /><br /></div> <div>Tomas left his professorship at Chalmers three years ago, to work with energy technology innovations and industrial development together with InnoEnergy, which is part of the EIT, European Institute of Innovation and Technology. He has also until recently been a member of the Swedish Government's Climate Policy Council and will continue as chairman of the Renewable Energy Institute in Tokyo and board member of Vattenfall.<br /><br /></div> <div><strong>– The key word during my years </strong>as Director for Chalmers Energy Area of Advance has been collaboration and achieving exciting strategic collaborations together with academia, authorities and industry, says Maria Grahn, associate professor at the Department of Mechanics and Maritime Sciences.</div> <div>For research on complex systems, the term wicked sustainability problems is sometimes used. One example is the transition into sustainable energy and transport systems.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><img src="/sv/styrkeomraden/energi/nyheter/PublishingImages/Maria_G.jpg" alt="Maria Grahn" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" style="margin:5px" />– Now, for example, electric cars are part of the solution, but as soon as you introduce electric cars, you have to deal with new challenges - you have to think about cobalt and lithium with all that entails regarding resource constraints and other risks such as child labor. But there is no actor who can solve a wicked problem on his own. So we have to take on the challenge from a larger perspective so that we really create a sustainable society and achieve the UN's sustainability goals, says Maria Grahn.</div> <div>During her time as Director for the Energy area, she introduced a special track for collaborative projects, where researchers can apply for funding where they take on a challenge based issue from at least two different aspects to find as sustainable solutions as possible.<br /><br /></div> <div><strong>The IPCC's latest report,</strong> Climate Change 2021: The Physical Science Basis, is the sharpest to date, with the same message as previous reports but now with even larger letters and with even more consensus among the researchers. In media reporting, one hears that much must change, not just the energy system, but everything from what we consume, to how it is produced. Here you have to be wise strategically and have a long-term focus.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>How do you see the role of Chalmers University of Technology and the Areas of Advance in contributing to this transition?</strong></div> <div>– Yes, the threat levels look worse. But at the same time, the technical solutions have become better and economically competitive. Now it is more about quickly putting the new technology into use and developing the industry in Sweden and Europe to enable global economic prosperity. Now it is more important and more fun to engage in energy technologies than it has been in 100 years, says Tomas Kåberger.</div> <div>Tomas is constantly moving between academia, authorities, environmental organizations, and companies, and they are also the ones who gather at our seminars.</div> <div>– Here, he points out, that Chalmers Areas of Advance has, in organized collaborations with companies at open seminars, managed to establish an arena that attracts participants from Chalmers and society. With these contacts with the outside world, Chalmers also contributes to the formation of new constellations of researchers to handle research tasks that are relevant to the outside world.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>What do you especially want to highlight?</strong></div> <div>– After the pandemic year, I hope that we will be able to have more creative meetings both internally and externally, and that the combination of real meetings and all the communication methods we have now learned will give us even more international exchange.</div> <div>Tomas Kåberger wants to contribute with efficient internal processes and focus on getting results in use.</div> <div>– It will be inspiring to, together with talented Chalmers researchers, contribute to the industrial development of western Sweden, Sweden and Europe, he concludes.<br /><br /><b>Related:<br /></b><span></span><a href="https://www.renewable-ei.org/en/about/leadership_team/profiles/"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Renewable Energy Institute, Japan</a><br /><a href="https://group.vattenfall.com/se/om-oss/bolagsstyrning/styrelsen/tomas-kaberger"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Vattenfall</a><br /><a href="https://www.klimatpolitiskaradet.se/en/"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Swedish Climate Policy Council</a><br /><a href="https://www.innoenergy.com/"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />InnoEnergy</a><br /><a href="https://sv.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tomas_K%c3%a5berger"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Tomas Kåberger – Wiki​</a><br /><br /><br />Photo: Christian Löwhagen<br />Text: Ann-Christine Nordin</div> <div><br /></div> ​Thu, 09 Sep 2021 10:15:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/researchinfrastructure/oso/news/Pages/Galaxies-inner-secrets-LOFAR.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/researchinfrastructure/oso/news/Pages/Galaxies-inner-secrets-LOFAR.aspxGalaxies’ inner secrets revealed in detail<p><b>​Astronomers at Chalmers are part of the international team behind new, uniquely detailed images from the gigantic radio telescope Lofar which reveal the inner workings of galaxies. The images are the culmination of almost a decade of work in combining data from a network of over 70 000 antennas spread over nine European countries, among them Sweden.</b></p><div><span style="background-color:initial"><strong>Revealing a hidden universe in high definition</strong></span><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div>The universe is awash with electromagnetic radiation, of which visible light comprises just the tiniest slice. From short-wavelength gamma rays and X-rays, to long-wavelength microwave and radio waves, each part of the light spectrum reveals something unique about the universe. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>The Lofar network captures images at FM radio frequencies that, unlike shorter wavelength sources like visible light, are not blocked by the clouds of dust and gas that can cover astronomical objects. Regions of space that seem dark to our eyes, actually burn brightly in radio waves – allowing astronomers to peer into star-forming regions or into the heart of galaxies themselves.</div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Centrum/Onsala%20rymdobservatorium/340x/I3_HerculesA_Timmerman_72dpi_340x340.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><br />The new images, made possible because of the international nature of the collaboration, push the boundaries of what we know about galaxies and super-massive black holes. A special issue of the scientific journal <em>Astronomy &amp; Astrophysics</em> is dedicated to new research papers describing these images and the scientific results.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>The international team of scientists, led by Leah Morabito at Durham University, UK, includes Chalmers astronomers John Conway and Eskil Varenius, and Deepika Venkattu, Ph.D. student at the Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University. </div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Better resolution by working together</strong></div> <div><br /></div> <div>The images reveal the inner workings of nearby and distant galaxies at a resolution 20 times sharper than typical Lofar images. This was made possible by the unique way the team made use of the array.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>The 70 000 Lofar antennas are spread across Europe, with the majority being located in the Netherlands. In standard operation, only the signals from antennas located in the Netherlands are combined, and creates a “virtual telescope” equivalent to a dish with a diameter of 120 kilometres. By using the signals from all the European antennae, the team have increased this diameter to almost 2000 kilometres, which provides twenty-fold sharper resolution.</div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Centrum/Onsala%20rymdobservatorium/340x/M2_Resolution_Fade_Movie_72dpi_340x340.gif" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><br /><span style="background-color:initial">Unlike other radio telescope arrays that combine multiple signals in real time to produce images, Lofar uses a new concept where the signals collected by each antenna are digitised, transported to central processor, and then combined to create an image. Each Lofar image is the result of combining the signals from tens of thousands of antennas, which is what makes their extraordinary resolution possible.</span><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div>- With its network of antennas over the whole of Europe, Lofar is showing us that it’s possible to make astonishingly detailed images of universe as we have never seen it before”, said John Conway, professor of radio astronomy at Chalmers, director of Onsala Space Observatory, and member of the team.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Jets and outflows from supermassive black holes</strong></div> <div><br /></div> <div>Supermassive black holes can be found lurking at the heart of many galaxies. Many of these are “active” black holes, which devour infalling matter and belch it back out into the cosmos as powerful jets and outflows of radiation. These jets are invisible to the naked eye, but they burn bright in radio waves and it is these that the new high-resolution images have focused upon. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>“These high-resolution images allow us to zoom in to see what’s really going on when supermassive black holes launch radio jets, which wasn’t possible before at frequencies near the FM radio band”, said team </div> <div>member Neal Jackson, University of Manchester, UK.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>The team’s work forms the basis of nine scientific studies that reveal new information on the inner structure of radio jets in a variety of different galaxies. </div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Centrum/Onsala%20rymdobservatorium/340x/badole_gravitational_lens_sv_72dpi_340x164.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><br /><strong style="background-color:initial">A decade-long challenge</strong><br /></div> <div><strong><br /></strong></div> <div>Even before Lofar started operations in 2012, the European team of astronomers began working to address the colossal challenge of combining the signals from more than 70 000 antennas located as much as 2000 km apart. The result, a publicly-available data-processing pipeline, which is described in detail in one of the scientific papers, will allow astronomers from around the world to use Lofar to make high-resolution images with relative ease.</div> <div><br /></div> <div> “Our aim is that this allows the scientific community to use the whole European network of Lofar telescopes for their own science, without having to spend years to become an expert”, said Leah Morabito.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Super images require supercomputers</strong></div> <div><strong><br /></strong></div> <div>The relative ease of the experience for the end user belies the complexity of the computational challenge that makes each image possible. Lofar doesn’t just take pictures of the night sky; it must stitch together the data gathered by more than 70 000 antennas, which is a huge computational task. To produce a single image, more than 13 terabits of raw data per second – the equivalent of more than a three hundred DVDs every second – must be digitised, transported to a central processor and then combined. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>“To process such immense data volumes we have to use supercomputers. These allow us to transform the terabytes of information from these antennas into just a few gigabytes of science-ready data, in only a couple of days”, said team member Frits Sweijen, Leiden University, Netherlands.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Contacts:</strong></div> <div> </div> <div>Robert Cumming, communicator, Onsala Space Observatory, Chalmers, tel: +46 70 493 3114, ro-bert.cumming@chalmers.se</div> <div>John Conway, professor of radio astronomy and director of Onsala Space Observatory, Chalmers, +46 31-772 5500, john.conway@chalmers.se</div> <div><br /></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><strong>More about Lofar</strong></span><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div>The International Lofar Telescope is a trans-European network of radio antennas, with a core located in Exloo in the Netherlands. Lofar works by combining the signals from more than 70,000 individual antenna dipoles, located in antenna stations across the Netherlands and in partner European countries. The stations are connected by a high-speed fibre optic network, with powerful computers used to process the radio signals in order to simulate a trans-European radio antenna that stretches over 1,300 kilometres. The International Lofar Telescope is unique, given its sensitivity, wide field-of-view, and image resolution or clarity. The Lofar data archive is the largest astronomical data collection in the world. </div> <div>Lofar was designed, built and is presently operated by Astron, the Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy. France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, the Netherlands, Poland, Sweden and the UK are all partner countries in the International Lofar Telescope.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Images</strong></div> <div><strong><br /></strong></div> <div>For a complete set of images, animations and infographics, see the <a href="https://www.astron.nl/most-detailed-ever-images-of-galaxies-revealed-using-lofar/">press release at Astron​</a>.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><em>A – Merging galaxies Arp 299. A galaxy-sized wind is revealed billowing out from a giant star factory, in a dust-enshrouded nucleus, that was triggered as two galaxies merge. Here, Lofar’s observations are shown in orange together with an image taken in visible light by the Hubble Space Telescope. </em><i style="background-color:initial"><a href="/SiteCollectionImages/Centrum/Onsala%20rymdobservatorium/665x318%20Enskilda%20artikelbilder/arp299_rev_300dpi_full.jpg">Access high-resolution image</a></i><em><br /></em></div> <div><em>Image credit: N. Ramírez-Olivencia et el. [radio]; NASA, ESA, the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)-ESA/Hubble Collaboration and A. Evans (University of Virginia, Charlottesville/NRAO/Stony Brook University), edited by R. Cumming [optical]</em></div> <div><em>Science paper: </em><span style="background-color:initial"><i><a href="/SiteCollectionDocuments/Centrum/Onsala%20rymdobservatorium/Forskningsartiklar/P5_MergingGalaxies_Ramirez-Olivencia.pdf">Ramírez-Olivencia m. fl. (pdf)​</a></i></span></div> <div><em><br /></em></div> <div><em>B – Hercules A. This galaxy is powered by a supermassive black hole located at its centre, which feeds on the surrounding gas and channels some of this gas into extremely fast jets. The new high-resolution observations reveal that this jet grows stronger and weaker every few hundred thousand years. This variability produces the beautiful structures seen in the giant lobes, each of which is about as large as the Milky Way galaxy. </em><i style="background-color:initial"><a href="/SiteCollectionImages/Centrum/Onsala%20rymdobservatorium/665x318%20Enskilda%20artikelbilder/I3_HerculesA_Timmerman_300dpi_full.jpg" style="outline:0px">Access high-resolution image</a></i></div> <div><em>Image credit: R. Timmerman; LOFAR &amp; Hubble Space Telescope</em></div> <div><em>Science paper: </em><span style="background-color:initial"><i><a href="https://doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361/202140880">https://doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361/202140880</a></i></span></div> <div><em><br /></em></div> <div><em>C - Sharper galaxy images with Lofar. This animation shows real radio galaxies from the science paper Morabito et al. (2021). The animation fades from the standard resolution to the high resolution, showing the detail we can see by using the new techniques.</em></div> <div><em>Image credit: L. K. Morabito; LOFAR Surveys KSP</em></div> <div><em>Science paper: </em><span style="background-color:initial"><i><a href="https://doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361/202140649">https://doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361/202140649</a></i></span></div> <div><em><br /></em></div> <div><em>D – Gravitational lens.  Lofar’s observations reveal the structure of a distant galaxy – a quasar - whose light has been bent by gravity around a massive cluster of galaxies in front of it. The illustration in the left panel shows how a gravitational lens works. </em></div> <div><em>Image credit: S. Badole; NASA, ESA &amp; L. Calçada</em></div> <div><em>Science paper: </em><span style="background-color:initial"><i><a href="https://doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361/202141227">https://doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361/202141227</a></i></span></div> ​Tue, 17 Aug 2021 18:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/energy/news/Pages/Energy-transition-needs-to-accelerate-urgently.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/energy/news/Pages/Energy-transition-needs-to-accelerate-urgently.aspxEnergy transition needs to accelerate urgently<p><b>​There are several viable paths towards a carbon-neutral future, and it is possible to achieve it by 2050. But it requires immediate action. That is the message from various European academies, including the Royal Academy of Engineering Sciences (IVA), which has been commissioned by the European Commission to provide advice on how to facilitate the energy transition  in Europe.</b></p>​<img src="/sv/styrkeomraden/energi/nyheter/PublishingImages/filipj.jpg" alt="Filip Johnsson" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" style="margin:5px" /><span style="background-color:initial"><strong>&quot;Our report shows </strong>big challenges but also significant opportunities in the transformation of the energy system&quot;, says IVA fellow Filip Johnsson, professor of Energy Systems at Chalmers, one of the experts behind the advice prepared for the European Commission. </span><div><br /></div> <div><strong>On 29 June 2021</strong>, the European Commission’s Scientific Advice Mechanism publishes two major documents on a systemic approach to the energy transition in Europe: </div> <div><ul><li>​An Evidence Review Report from SAPEA presents the latest scientific evidence and a series of evidence-based policy options.</li> <li>The Group of Chief Scientific Advisors’ Scientific Opinion, informed by this evidence, presents key policy recommendations.</li></ul></div> <div><strong>The expert group emphasises</strong> that the transition to sustainable energy is not just a technical challenge. To enable the transition, a huge systemic problem must be solved by coordinating investment, consumption, and behavior across Europe. This means transforming the entire European energy system — a change which will affect every part of our society and require huge investment during the transition. And we already need to accelerate progress if we want to achieve the EU’s target of net zero emissions by 2050.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>“Thanks to the enthusiastic</strong> engagement of top experts from academies across Europe, both within Euro-CASE and across many other disciplines represented within the SAPEA consortium, we are able to present this comprehensive report to the European Commission. Our advice could not be more timely, as the EU prepares to publish its strategy for a zero-carbon future, and the world wakes up to the urgency of fighting climate change.” says Tuula Teeri, IVA’s President.</div> <div><br /><div>In the work on the Evidence Review Report, SAPEA selected experts from different disciplines. The group was led by Professor Peter Lund.<br /><br /></div> <div><strong>The full report and a complete list of the working group can be found at</strong> <a href="http://www.sapea.info/energy" style="outline:currentcolor none 0px"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />www.sapea.info/energy​​</a></div></div> <div><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Facts about Euro-CASE</strong></div> <div>Five years ago, the European Commission set up SAM (The Scientific Advice Mechanism). Through it, the Commission asks European academies to provide scientific evidence for future policy decisions. One of the networks is Euro-CASE (European Council of Academies of Applied Sciences, Technologies and Engineering) that brings together European academies that focus on engineering and technology, IVA being one of the academy members.</div>Wed, 30 Jun 2021 15:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/researchinfrastructure/oso/news/Pages/Eclipse-linked-Gothenburg-kids-to-space-and-Chalmers.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/researchinfrastructure/oso/news/Pages/Eclipse-linked-Gothenburg-kids-to-space-and-Chalmers.aspxSolar eclipse linked Gothenburg kids to space - and to Chalmers<p><b>​Seeing a solar eclipse can be a memorable experience. In three new Chalmers projects, the solar eclipse on 10 June gave young people extra access to space and to science. But not without a bit of luck with the weather, technology and social distancing.</b></p>​<span style="background-color:initial">One of the sky’s biggest events of the year began at 11:30 on the second Thursday in June, when the moon slid gently in front of the sun, a partial solar eclipse visible from Gothenburg and many other places. The event was also an important part of three different initiatives, in three different places, all with the aim of giving young people extra science capital, with the help of Chalmers. </span><div><br /><span style="background-color:initial"></span><div>In all three locations, plans had been changing, right until the last minute. This was the moment of truth for two school classes and their teachers, a handful of Chalmers students, several radio astronomers and two unsuspecting telescopes.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Centrum/Onsala%20rymdobservatorium/340x/lovgardet_solf_lank_72dpi_340x340.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><br /></div> <div>On the stone steps to the playground at the Lövgärdesskolan, a school on the north side of Gothenburg, the entire year 4 gathered to look at the eclipse. They were well prepared. Science teacher Catrine Berglund had sneaked in micro-lessons about space throughout the spring term, and students had painted space motifs on corridor walls to add to the excitement. And the day before, Robert Cumming from Onsala Space Observatory had delivered two &quot;sun cradles&quot; for projecting the sun safely.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>The school had also bought in special eclipse glasses for the whole class - useful for anyone who wants to look at the sun. But the clouds looked dishearteningly dense and grey. Would the sun come out at all?</div> <div><br /></div> <div>In Slottsskogen Park in central Gothenburg, another group gathered: a handful of students in the newly started network Upprymd. During the spring, they had met over Zoom to be trained in public engagement about space. Now getting to know each other in person for the first time, they could start their mission as communicative astronomers.</div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Centrum/Onsala%20rymdobservatorium/340x/slottsskogen2_72dpi_340x340.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><span style="background-color:initial">​</span></div> <div>Equipped with binoculars and a cardboard screen, the plan was to show the eclipse to other park visitors. Here, clouds and eye protection were part of the challenge. How could they balance keeping a good corona-safe distance, but at the same time being open and friendly?</div> <div><br /></div> <div>South of the city, at Onsala Space Observatory, Robert Cumming and Eskil Varenius took the opportunity to try a new way of viewing the solar eclipse with the observatory's smallest radio telescopes, SALSA, as part of a third project, “SALSA for years 7-9”, funded by the Swedish Research Council. With an improved user interface, SALSA is currently being adapted to make radio astronomy projects possible for students in their younger teens. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>Here, at least, the weather wasn’t a problem. Radio telescopes can see the sky through thick clouds, and SALSA is no exception. But they had never been used before to see a solar eclipse, and the software was also brand new and untested. On top of that, the plan was to show SALSA live on a link for the school in Gothenburg. Would it really succeed?</div> <div><br /></div> <div>And just where had the sun got to? The wait was nervous in all three places. Gaps finally appeared in the clouds, first in Onsala, then over the park, and finally also at the schoolyard, but those moments were few and easy to miss.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>There! The round disk of the sun, clearly with a chunk missing! For those who got a look, it really was a moment to remember. </div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Centrum/Onsala%20rymdobservatorium/340x/salsa_solf_20210610_72dpi_340x277.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" /></div> <div><br /></div> <div>The kids on the school stairs didn’t all see the eclipse, but everyone had experienced something out of the ordinary. A reporter from local radio station was on hand to broadcast live, and young enthusiasts Amina and Huzaifa and their friends got to explain the phenomenon to the listeners. In the city park, the students chose eclipse glasses over projection as the best way to share the sight of the cloud-shrouded eclipse, but everyone was satisfied in the end. In Onsala, the measurements clearly showed that the moon really had blocked some of the sun’s radio waves - the experiment was successful. Network issues affected the live connection to the school (and to some extent also the observatory's high-tech reputation). But contact was made and everyone got to say hi.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>After almost two hours, the sun was back to being whole again and it was all over for this time. However, all three projects will continue during the rest of the year. At the school, a special space day is planned for 23 September 2021. For the student network Upprymd, there will be online question and answer sessions with school classes and other events. They’ll also test SALSA and its new software, and start to help school students and teachers make their own radio observations.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>For the solar eclipse over western Sweden we’ll have to wait until 25 October 2022. What are we going to come up with for that? With a bit more science capital to spare, there will be new opportunities for everyone.</div> <div>The project with Lövgärdesskolan is run in collaboration with the City of Gothenburg, the housing company Poseidon and space industry company CAES (Cobham Gaisler).</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Text: Robert Cumming</div> <div><br /></div> <div><em>Images:</em></div> <div><em><br /></em></div> <div><em>A (top) </em><span style="background-color:initial"><em>Johannes Reldin photographed the eclipsed sun through the mesh of one of the SALSA antennas. </em></span></div> <em> </em><div><br /></div> <div><em>B </em><span style="background-color:initial"><em>S</em></span><span style="background-color:initial"><em>ALSA and Robert Cumming on a live </em></span><span style="background-color:initial"><em>link from Onsala with year 4 students. Photo: Eva Loström/Lövgärdesskolan</em></span></div> <em> </em><div><br /></div> <div><em>C Students in the Upprymd network watching the eclipse in Slottsskogen park. Credit: Andri Spilker</em></div> <div><em> </em></div> <em> </em><div><em>D Radio partial eclipse:  the top graph shows measurements with SALSA throughout the day on 10 June 2021. During the solar eclipse (dashed lines mark its beginning and end) the radio waves from the sun were clearly less than usual. (Credit: Eskil Varenius)</em></div> ​</div>Fri, 18 Jun 2021 09:00:00 +0200