Radiation emitted by energetic electrons in the presence of magnetic fields.
Recently published results shed new ligth on the time before the universe became significantly magnetized.​ This is a composite image of the collision of two galaxy clusters and the pink color indicates a radiation emitted by energetic electrons in the presence of magnetic fields (the phenomenon is called "radio halo"). That galaxy clusters emit these radio waves is a direct evidence of that they are magnetized.​​​​​
Image: Chandra X-Ray Observatory/Joseph DePasquale/Wikimedia Commons

They shed light on how magnetic fields evolved in the early universe

​​The evolution of the magnetic fields in the universe is a major open question, as they have a profound effect on the formation of stars and galaxies, and on cosmic particle acceleration. 
Recently published results shed new ligth on the time before the universe became significantly magnetized.
István Pusztai at the Department of Physics at Chalmers is the first author of the  paper, recently published in Physical Review Letters. Together with PhD student Andréas Sundström and colleagues in Stockholm and in the US, he has shed new light on the evolution of magnetic fields in the early universe.

The researchers have studied the top candidate mechanism to generate magnetic fields permeating the universe – the dynamo  applying a more accurate description of ionized matter than ever in this context. 
Researcher István Pusztai

"Our new results suggest that the dynamo might have been less effective before the universe became significantly magnetized. This, in turn, can impact how galaxies are formed and galaxy clusters evolved.” says Senior Research Scientist István Pusztai.

Text: Mia Halleröd Palmgren, mia.hallerodpalmgren@chalmers.se​

More on the scientific paper.

The article is written by István Pusztai, James Juno, Axel Brandenburg, Jason M. TenBarge, Ammar Hakim, Manaure Francisquez, and Andréas Sundström. 

For more information, contact: 

István Pusztai, Senior Research Scientist​, Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, pusztai@chalmers.se, +46 31 772 32 36 

Published: Thu 03 Sep 2020.