Yasmine Sassa
Yasmine Sassa at the Department of Physics develops skyrmions, new combinations of materials that have exotic magnetic states. They can play an important role in future data storage technologies. ​​​​
Photo: Mats Hulander

Exploring exotic materials for technologies of the future

The development of computer and energy technologies is beginning to slow down. New magnetic and electronic materials are needed for it to regain momentum. As a Wallenberg Academy Fellow Chalmers researcher Yasmine Sassa is developing new combinations of materials that display exotic magnetic states, skyrmions, which could play an important role in future technologies for data storage.
Our electronic revolution is built upon semiconducting silicon. Thanks to its unique properties, electronics and information technologies have developed at an explosive rate, but we are reaching the limit of what today’s materials can do. New hi-tech materials are needed for continued development.

Yasmine Sassa, Assistant Professor at the Department of Physics at Chalmers University of Technology, is developing experimental methods for studying transition metal oxides. These materials have many promising properties for future electronics; when they are combined in a particular manner, they can function as superconductors, or create the right conditions for exotic magnetic states, skyrmions or other topological magnetic states, that could be used for new ways of storing data. If the material is produced as extremely thin films, just a few atoms thick, quantum effects occur that can be used to build quantum computers. 

Unexpected magnetic and electronic materials properties

“My interest in strongly correlated physics started as a Master's student when I took a course about peculiar phenomena in solid-state physics,” says Yasmine Sassa. 

“In this course, we talked about frustrated magnetism and unconventional superconductivity, to name two examples out of many. After that, I had the privilege of extending my knowledge during my Ph.D. and Postdocs. I discovered a fascinating world of new physical properties that cannot be simply explained within classical models. The various correlations give rise to unexpected magnetic and electronic materials properties. If we understand how to control and tune them, we can develop and tailor materials for sustainable technological applications. This is what drives me to pursue research in this field.”

Control of quantum effects

In her research, Yasmine Sassa will study the extremely thin films mentioned above, and optimize their chemical composition so that she can study novel topological magnetic states such as skyrmions and control their quantum effects. The long-term objective is to obtain materials that could start a new revolution in the development of hi-tech industries.  

“I think this research project will push forward our understanding of the skyrmionics field and, in turn, help to develop energy-efficient and sustainable future memory and logic devices. It will give another approach to quantum computing.” says Yasmine Sassa. “The Wallenberg Academic Fellow is a very prestigious grant, and I am honored to receive it! The grant will allow me to explore challenging ideas and take some risks in the project. It will also allow me to compete internationally and establish the skyrmion research field in Sweden.”

For more information, please contact:

Yasmine Sassa, Assistant Professor at the division of Materials Physics, Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology
yasmine.sassa@chalmers.se, 031 772 60 88 

Four Wallenberg Academy Fellows to Chalmers 2021

The research funding from the Wallenberg Academy Fellowship amounts to between SEK 5 and 15 million per researcher over five years, depending on the subject area. After the end of the first period, researchers have the opportunity to apply for another five years of funding. Read about the other appointments:

Hannes Thiel, Mathematical Sciences

Text: Knut and Alice Wallenberg stiftelse and Lisa Gahnertz

Page manager Published: Fri 25 Mar 2022.