Philippe Tassin
Philippe Tassin, Associate Professor at the Department of Physics at Chalmers, is one of eight prominent researchers who will join the Young Academy of Sweden for five years.​​​​​​​​​​​​​
​Image: Sabina Johansson

A master of light elected to the Young Academy of Sweden

​Chalmers physicist Philippe Tassin is elected member of the Young Academy of Sweden. He is an Associate Professor at the Department of Physics and one of eight prominent researchers who will join the academy for five years.​
In the Young Academy of Sweden, just over thirty selected young researchers collaborate on issues related to research policy and outreach. The Academy is an independent platform providing young researchers with a strong voice in the science policy debate and promoting science and research to young adults and children.
 
"I'm really looking forward to working with researchers from across the country and collaborating with researchers from a wide spectrum of scientific disciplines. As a member of the Young Academy of Sweden, I want to further my commitment to a number of research policy issues and popular science activities," said Philippe Tassin, the only physicist to be elected.
Studying how light can be controlled
Philippe Tassin’s research group is active in nanophotonics, a subfield of physics studying how light can be controlled and manipulated with electromagnetic structured materials. Light and electromagnetic waves are of paramount importance to our modern society, for the internet, smartphones, TV screens, etc. But further progress of optics technology is limited by the availability of natural optical materials.
To circumvent the limitations of natural materials, Tassin and his co-workers study and design man-made structured materials that can manipulate electromagnetic waves—from microwaves, over terahertz waves, to visible light—in ways that are impossible with natural materials. This is achieved by using small electric circuits instead of atoms as the basic constituents for the interaction of electromagnetic waves with matter. Electromagnetic structured materials have the potential to create devices that can exert precise and advanced control over light.
Researcher, teacher and clarinettist
Philippe Tassin’s research has attracted attention around the world and he himself has worked in Belgium, Greece, and the USA before joining Chalmers in 2013. Along with his research, he teaches electromagnetism, optics, quantum mechanics, and computer science at Chalmers. Music being a great interest to him, he also likes to play the clarinet whenever he has the time.
As a member of the Young Academy of Sweden, he can take his interest in science and education policy and in science popularization to a new level.  
 
"I would like to work with questions regarding the internationalization of Swedish universities, the public's awareness of science, and academic careers. There are no simple solutions to these challenges, but I think it is important that young academics have a voice in the debate and take their responsibility.” 
More Chalmers Professors in the academy
In addition to Philippe Tassin​, Chalmers Professor Rikard Landberg from the Department of Biology and Biological Engineering is also elected  to the Young Academy of Sweden. Read more about him in the article Food and nutrition makes an entry in Young Academy of Sweden​
Chalmers Professor Kirsten Kraiberg Knudsen at the Department of Space, Earth and Environment is already a member of the academy. 
Text: Mia Halleröd Palmgren, mia.hallerodpalmgren@chalmers.se​​
 

More about Philippe Tassin 

Born: 1982 in Belgium, he moved to Gothenburg in 2013 when he started working at Chalmers.
Interests: When he does not teach or research, he can be found playing clarinet in a symphony orchestra, on the ski slopes, discovering countries all over the world, or simply reading a good book.
About his passion for physics: “You face a problem that no one has ever solved before. After having tried and failed many times, you find the solution and then you realize you’re the only person in the world to know the solution. This is one thing that inspires me”.
Read more about Philippe Tassin and his research:

 

More about the Young Academy of Sweden 

The Young Academy of Sweden is a transdisciplinary academy for a selection of the most prominent, younger researchers in Sweden. Its operations rest firmly on three pillars: transdisciplinarity, science policy and outreach. The Academy is an independent platform that provides younger researchers with a strong voice in the science policy debate and that promotes science and research to young adults and children. In the Academy young researchers meet across institutional and disciplinary borders to discuss research and research related topics. The Young Academy of Sweden was formed at the initiative of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences and currently has 33 members.
Find all Chalmers researchers who are or have been members of the Young Academy of Sweden.

Published: Mon 28 May 2018. Modified: Mon 28 May 2018