News: Fysikhttp://www.chalmers.se/sv/nyheterNews related to Chalmers University of TechnologyThu, 04 Jun 2020 15:58:17 +0200http://www.chalmers.se/sv/nyheterhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Nasal_spray_could_deliver_a_future_mRNA_vaccine_against_COVID_19.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Nasal_spray_could_deliver_a_future_mRNA_vaccine_against_COVID_19.aspxNasal spray could deliver vaccine against COVID-19<p><b>​In the the global struggle against the coronavirus, scientists in a new pilot project led by Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have started a project to explore design principles for nasal immunization. If successful it might be useful in future vaccine developments versus viral infections including SARS-CoV-2. Through a broad collaboration between universities and external partners, the researchers are trying to find a new way to tackle both SARS-CoV-2 and other viruses that attack our cells.​</b></p><div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/F/350x305/coronavaccin_pilotprojekt_Karin_labb_350x305.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="" style="margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:5px;margin-left:10px;height:249px;width:280px" /><div>“There are several benefits to administering a vaccine directly into the nasal mucosa. It mimics how many viruses often enter the body and can therefore more effectively trigger the immune defence at the point of entry,” says researcher Karin Norling at the Department of Biology and Biological Engineering at Chalmers University of Technology. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>Karin Norling recently defended her<a href="/en/centres/gpc/calendar/Pages/Disputation-Karin-Norling-200221.aspx"> PhD thesis in bioscience</a>, and is now in the process of coordinating and preparing the laboratory work for the new pilot project.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><div>By combining several promising concepts developed at Chalmers, the University of Gothenburg, AstraZeneca and internationally, the researchers hope to be able to test a unique vaccination concept against COVID-19. </div> <div>​<br /></div> </div></div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">A harmless particle that deceives the body's immune cells</h2> <div><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"><div>The researchers aim to design a biomimetic​ nanoparticle that deceives the body's immune cells to act as if they had encountered a true virus. In fact, they encounter something known as an mRNA, which is a precursor to a harmless element of the virus. In addition, the artificial particle has been provided with both immune enhancers and a targeting protein, which acts almost as a set of directions – allowing the vaccine to reach only a certain type of immune cell. When activated, the body will hopefully learn to recognise and defend itself against the virus in the future.</div></span><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/F/350x305/350x305_Fredrik_Hook.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px;height:132px;width:150px" /><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial"><div><br /></div></span><span style="background-color:initial"><div>&quot;We hope that this multidisciplinary approach will inform how future vaccine platforms for nasal mRNA delivery can be designed,&quot;  says Fredrik Höök, Professor at the Department of Physics at Chalmers and Project Coordinator of the centre <a href="/en/centres/FoRmulaEx/Pages/default.aspx">Formulaex​</a>, where AstraZeneca is the leading industrial partner.</div></span></div> <div><h2 class="chalmersElement-H2"><span><span>&quot;</span></span>It will take years to develop a vaccine<span style="font-family:inherit;background-color:initial">&quot;</span></h2></div> <div><div><span style="background-color:initial"><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/F/Blandade%20dimensioner%20inne%20i%20artikel/Karin_Norling_280x.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:200px;height:177px" /><div>During the pilot project, the researchers will evaluate the prerequisites for a longer and more extensive project to develop a COVID-19 vaccine in nasal spray form. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>“It will take years to develop a vaccine but hopefully after this project we will be able to say whether the concept of a targeted nasal spray vaccine is promising enough to warrant further work,” says Karin Norling.​</div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-020-01221-y">When the scientific journal Nature recently described different types of vaccine concepts being tested, mRNA technology was included in the list.​</a></div> <div><br /></div></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"></span></div></div> <div><h2 class="chalmersElement-H2"><span>More on the interdisciplinary pilot project</span></h2></div> <img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/F/350x305/coronavaccin_pilotprojekt_provror350x305.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px;height:157px;width:180px" /><div><span></span><div>The new research collaboration also involves Elin Esbjörner Winters and Pernilla Wittung Stafshede from Chalmers, Nils Lycke from the Sahlgrenska Academy, the University of Gothenburg and Lennart Lindfors from AstraZeneca.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>The project is funded by the Chalmers Innovation Office, Chalmers Area of Advance Health Engineering, The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research, SSF, and the Swedish Research Council (VR). The project is partly performed within the framework of the SSF-funded Formulaex research center.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Fredrik Höök is also a Profile Leader of <a href="/en/areas-of-advance/health/about/Pages/default.aspx">Chalmers’ new Area of Advance within Health Engineering​</a>, which addresses societal challenges by providing innovative technologies and solutions to the medical and health area in collaboration with regional, national and international partners.</div></div> <span></span><div><br /></div> <div><strong style="background-color:initial">Text and photo:</strong><span style="background-color:initial"> Mia Halleröd Palmgren, </span><a href="mailto:mia.hallerodpalmgren@chalmers.se">mia.hallerodpalmgren@chalmers.se</a> and Joshua Worth, <a href="mailto:joshua.worth@chalmers.se">joshua.worth@chalmers.se​</a><br /></div> <div><b>Portrait photos: </b>Helén Rosenfeldt (Karin Norling) and Johan Bodell (Fredrik Höök)</div> <div>​<br /></div> <div><h2 class="chalmersElement-H2"><span>For more information, contact: </span></h2></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">Doctor <a href="/en/Staff/Pages/karinno.aspx">Karin Norling​</a>, Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, +46 73 045 03 60, </span><a href="mailto:karin.norling@chalmers.se">karin.norling@chalmers.se</a><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div>Professor <a href="/en/Staff/Pages/Fredrik-Höök.aspx">Fredrik Höök​</a>, Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, +46 31 772 61 30, <a href="mailto:fredrik.hook@chalmers.se">fredrik.hook@chalmers.se</a></div>Thu, 28 May 2020 06:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/A-spreadable-way-to-stabilise-solid-state-batteries.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/A-spreadable-way-to-stabilise-solid-state-batteries.aspxA spreadable way to stabilise solid state batteries<p><b>Solid state batteries are of great interest to the electric vehicle industry. Scientists at Chalmers and Xi&#39;an Jiaotong University, China now present a new way of taking this promising concept closer to large-scale application. An interlayer, made of a spreadable, ‘butter-like’ material helps improve the current density tenfold, while also increasing performance and safety.​​​​​​​​</b></p><div><span style="background-color:initial"><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/F/350x305/Shizhao_Xiong_350x305.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="Porträtt av forskaren Shizhao Xiong " style="margin:5px;width:170px;height:150px" /><div>“This interlayer makes the battery cell significantly more stable, and therefore able to withstand much higher current density. What is also important is that it is very easy to apply the soft mass onto the lithium metal anode in the battery – like spreading butter on a sandwich,” says researcher Shizhao Xiong at the Department of Physics at Chalmers.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Alongside Chalmers Professor Aleksandar Matic and Professor Song's research group in Xi'an, Shizhao Xiong has been working for a long time on crafting a suitable interlayer to stabilise the interface for solid state battery. The new results were recently presented in the prestigious scientific journal Advanced Functional Materials.</div> <div><br /></div></span><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/F/Blandade%20dimensioner%20inne%20i%20artikel/solidstatebatterilabb750x.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="Bild från batterilabbet på Fysik på Chalmers." style="margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:5px;margin-left:10px;height:263px;width:350px" /><span style="background-color:initial"><div>Solid state batteries could revolutionise electric transport. Unlike today's lithium-ion batteries, solid-state batteries have a solid electrolyte and therefore contain no environmentally harmful or flammable liquids.</div> <div>Simply put, a solid-state battery can be likened to a dry sandwich. A layer of the metal lithium acts as a slice of bread, and a ceramic substance is laid on top like a filling. This hard substance is the solid electrolyte of the battery, which transports lithium ions between the electrodes of the battery. But the ‘sandwich’ is so dry, it is difficult to keep it together – and there are also problems caused by the compatibility between the ‘bread’ and the ‘topping’. Many researchers around the world are working to develop suitable resolutions to address this problem.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>The material which the researchers in Gothenburg and Xi'an are now working with is a soft, spreadable, ‘butter-like’ substance, made of nanoparticles of the ceramic electrolyte, LAGP, mixed with an ionic liquid. The liquid encapsulates the LAGP particles and makes the interlayer soft and protective. The material, which has a similar texture to butter from the fridge, fills several functions and can be spread easily.</div> <div>Although the potential of solid-state batteries is very well known, there is as yet no established way of making them sufficiently stable, especially at high current densities, when a lot of energy is extracted from a battery cell very quickly, that is at fast charge or discharge. The Chalmers researchers see great potential in the development of this new interlayer.</div></span><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/F/350x305/AleksandarMatic_200314_350x305.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="Porträtt av professor Aleksandar Matic" style="margin:5px;height:150px;width:170px" /><span style="background-color:initial"><div><br /></div> <div>&quot;This is an important step on the road to being able to manufacture large-scale, cost-effective, safe and environmentally friendly batteries that deliver high capacity and can be charged and discharged at a high rate,&quot; says Aleksandar Matic, Professor at the Department of Physics at Chalmers, who predicts that solid state batteries will be on the market within five years.</div> <div><br /></div></span></div> <div><a href="https://doi.org/10.1002/adfm.202001444"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Read the scientific paper in </a><span style="font-size:10pt;background-color:initial"><a href="https://doi.org/10.1002/adfm.202001444">Advanced Functional Materials.</a></span></div> <div><a href="http://www.mynewsdesk.com/uk/chalmers/pressreleases/a-spreadable-interlayer-could-make-solid-state-batteries-more-stable-2999857"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Read the press release and dowload high resolution images. ​</a></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><strong>Text and photo​: </strong>Mia Halleröd Palmgren, <a href="mailto:mia.hallerodpalmgren@chalmers.se">mia.hallerodpalmgren@chalmers.se</a></div> <div><br /></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">Caption: </span><span style="background-color:initial">A large part of the experimental work on developing a multifunctional spreadable interlayer for the solid-state batteries of the future has been done in the battery lab at the Department of Physics at Chalmers.</span><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">More on the scientific paper </h2> <div>The paper <a href="https://doi.org/10.1002/adfm.202001444">”Design of a Multifunctional Interlayer for NASCION‐Based Solid‐State Li Metal Batteries”</a>  has been published in Advanced Functional Materials. It is written by <span style="background-color:initial">Shizhao Xiong, Yangyang Liu, Piotr Jankowski, Qiao Liu, Florian Nitze, Kai Xie, Jiangxuan Song and Aleksandar Matic. </span></div> <div>The researchers are active at Chalmers University of Technology, Xi'an Jiaotong University, China, the Technical University of Denmark and the National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, Hunan, China.</div> <div><br /></div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">For more information, contact: </h2> <div><strong><a href="/en/Staff/Pages/Shizhao-Xiong.aspx">Shizhao Xiong</a></strong>, Post doc, Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, +46 31 772 62 84, <a href="mailto:shizhao.xiong@chalmers.se">shizhao.xiong@chalmers.se </a></div> <div><strong><a href="/en/Staff/Pages/Aleksandar-Matic.aspx">Aleksandar Matic​</a></strong>, Professor, <span style="background-color:initial">Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology,</span><span style="background-color:initial"> +46 </span><span style="background-color:initial">31 772 51 76, </span><a href="mailto:%20matic@chalmers.se">matic@chalmers.se ​</a></div> <span></span><div></div> <div><br /></div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">Further battery research at Chalmers​</h2> <div><a href="/en/areas-of-advance/Transport/news/Pages/Testbed-for-electromobility-gets-575-million-SEK.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Testbed for electromobility gets 575 million SEK​​</a><br /></div> <div><a href="/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/A-new-concept-could-make-more-environmentally-friendly-batteries-possible-.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />A new concept for more sustainable batteries</a></div> <div><span></span><a href="/sv/institutioner/fysik/nyheter/Sidor/Grafensvamp-kan-gora-framtidens-batterier-mer-effektiva.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" /></a><span style="background-color:initial"><font color="#5b97bf"><b><a href="/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Graphene_sponge_paves_the_way_for_future_batteries.aspx">Graphene sponge paves the way for future batteries​</a></b></font></span></div> <div><a href="/en/departments/ims/news/Pages/carbon-fibre-can-store-energy.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" /></a><span style="background-color:initial"><font color="#5b97bf"><b><a href="/en/departments/ims/news/Pages/carbon-fibre-can-store-energy.aspx">Carbon fibre can store energy in the body of a vehicle</a></b></font></span></div> <div><a href="/en/departments/chem/news/Pages/Liquid-storage-of-solar-energy-–-more-effective-than-ever-before.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Liquid storage of solar energy – more effective than ever before</a></div>Tue, 19 May 2020 07:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/New-insights-on-controlling-diesel-engine-exhaust.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/New-insights-on-controlling-diesel-engine-exhaust.aspxNew insights on controlling diesel engine exhaust<p><b>​​​Nitrogen monoxide (NO) is hazardous and catalytic techniques are used to reduce NO to molecular nitrogen and water using ammonia as a reducing agent. This is a challenging problem given that diesel exhaust contain only one NO molecule per 300 oxygen molecules.</b></p><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/F/Blandade%20dimensioner%20inne%20i%20artikel/Linchen_JPG.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px;height:118px;font-family:&quot;open sans&quot;, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;width:100px" /><span style="background-color:initial;font-family:&quot;open sans&quot;, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px">How can we make ammonia react only with NO and not with oxygen forming even more NO? </span><p style="margin-bottom:10px;font-family:&quot;open sans&quot;, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;line-height:19.5px">Lin Chen, Department of Physics at Chalmers, has targeted this important environmental problem together with industrial and academic partners using first principles calculations. Their work, which just have appeared in ACS Catalysis, presents for the first time a complete catalytic cycle for the reaction when it occurs over zeolites functionalized with copper.     </p> <p style="margin-bottom:10px;font-family:&quot;open sans&quot;, helvetica, arial, sans-serif;font-size:13px;line-height:19.5px"><a href="https://doi.org/10.1021/acscatal.0c00440"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Read the scientific paper in ACS Catalysis.​</a></p> Thu, 07 May 2020 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/Volunteers-produce-aprons-for-the-healthcare-system.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/Volunteers-produce-aprons-for-the-healthcare-system.aspxVolunteers produce aprons for the healthcare system<p><b>​In a room at Johanneberg Science Park on Chalmers campus, volunteers are making protective aprons for the healthcare system. In two weeks, over 2000 aprons have been produced.“We can see that our initiative is helping,” says Carl Strandby, a student at Chalmers University of Technology.</b></p><div>​<span style="background-color:initial">Förklädeshjälpen (The Apron Help) started 17 April when a group of people came together to try to help the healthcare system during the corona crisis, by producing protective equipment other than visors. They quickly got the opportunity to house the initiative in a newly renovated room at Johanneberg Science Park, and just hours after they had gained access to the room, the production of protective aprons was up and running. One of the initiators is Carl Strandby, who is studying Engineering Physics at Chalmers.</span><br /></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <span></span><div>“Many people are worried and scared when everything feels uncertain, and we want to show how to turn that worry into something productive where we work together to find solutions. There is also a responsibility in this kind of situation, you cannot just rely on others to take care of everything, you need to think about how you can help,” says Carl Strandby.</div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">Helps health centers and retirement homes</h2> <div>On the first day of production, Förklädeshjälpen produced 100 aprons, and just over two weeks later, they have produced over 2000. The aprons go to health centers and retirement homes that work with corona infected patients. The initiative consists of a core group of about 10 people and, in addition, about 100 people have done at least one shift at Förklädeshjälpen, and three or four new people come every day.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>“We can see that our initiative is helping. Some people who come here to collect aprons, for retirement homes for example, say that they do not have any aprons at all, so it shows that initiatives such as Förklädeshjälpen are needed,” says Carl Strandby.</div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">Plastic aprons with &quot;welded&quot; seams</h2> <div>When the volunteers come to help produce aprons, they first have to prepare by washing their hands and using disinfectant. The actual production consists of cutting out patterns from a plastic roll according to a template. They have received the templates from their sister initiative in Stockholm. Heat guns and irons are used to fuse the sleeves in the plastic, and then the aprons are folded together and packed in boxes. They always wait three days before delivering the finished aprons to the health care, to avoid the spread of infection.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>In a Facebook group, Förklädeshjälpen continuously shares information about the initiative and this is also where you sign up for shifts.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>“There is still a great need for aprons, and we will continue to produce them as long as there is a demand,” says Carl Strandby.</div> <div>​<br /></div> <div><strong>Text: </strong>Sophia Kristensson</div> <strong><div><strong><br /></strong></div> Read more:</strong> <a href="/en/news/Pages/Students-supply-staff-in-the-west-with-visors.aspx" target="_blank">Students supply staff in the west with visors​</a>Wed, 06 May 2020 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/A-FAIR-mission-and-an-extended-assignment-at-Physics.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/A-FAIR-mission-and-an-extended-assignment-at-Physics.aspxA FAIR mission – and an extended assignment at Physics<p><b></b></p><span style="background-color:initial"><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/F/350x305/Thomas-Nilsson-350x305.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:220px;height:193px" />It will become one of the world’s largest research infrastructures. </span><span style="background-color:initial">FAIR – Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research –  is under construction at the site of the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt, Germany. </span><div><br /><span style="background-color:initial"></span><div>Now, Professor <a href="/en/Staff/Pages/Thomas-Nilsson.aspx">Thomas Nilsson,</a> Head of the Department  of Physics at Chalmers, will join the FAIR and GSI Joint Scientific Council (JSC) as Vice Chair. <span style="background-color:initial">The position also entails being a member of the GSI Supervisory Board. In that role, Thomas Nilsson will give advice in scientific and technical matters of fundamental importance.</span></div> <div><br /></div> <div>The new mission is a sideline to Nilsson's regular service as Head of Department. As of 1 May his appointment at Physics was extended by three years.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Text: Mia Halleröd Palmgren,<a href="mailto:%20mia.hallerodpalmgren@chalmers.se"> mia.hallerodpalmgren@chalmers.se​</a></div> <div><br /></div> <a href="https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details/2020/04/28/auftragsvergabe_baufeld_sued0.htm"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" /></a><a href="https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details/2020/04/28/auftragsvergabe_baufeld_sued0.htm"><div style="display:inline !important">Read more on FAIR.</div></a><br /> ​<div><a href="https://youtu.be/U6WuXJ5lj6E"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Check out FAIR’s construction site from</a><a href="https://youtu.be/U6WuXJ5lj6E"><span> </span>above.​​</a></div> </div>Mon, 04 May 2020 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/Transport/news/Pages/Testbed-for-electromobility-gets-575-million-SEK.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/Transport/news/Pages/Testbed-for-electromobility-gets-575-million-SEK.aspxTestbed for electromobility gets 575 million SEK<p><b>​One of Europe’s leading testbeds for electric and charging vehicles is now one step closer to realisation. The Swedish Energy Agency grants SEEL, Swedish Electric Transport Laboratory, 575 million SEK in support.</b></p>​<span style="background-color:initial">The important development of electrified vehicles, vessels and aircraft is in full progress. But there are knowledge gaps in the area of electric and charging vehicles, at both industrial and societal levels. New experience is needed, and innovative concepts are tested and evaluated.<br /></span><div>Swedish Electric Transport Laboratory, SEEL, is a comprehensive investment in a testbed for electric and charging vehicles. The corporation Swedish Electric Transport Laboratory AB is founded by Chalmers University of Technology and RISE (Research Institutes of Sweden), and a wide range of players will operate within the SEEL testbed.</div> <div><div> “It is very positive news to now have another piece of this puzzle in place. In order to deliver world-leading expertise within electrified transportation, we now also need to secure the conditions for academic research and education of the highest international standard. This requires new public research resources within SEEL’s field of activity”, says Stefan Bengtsson, President and CEO of Chalmers.</div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">&quot;A big step towards a more sustainable society&quot;</h2></div> <div>Robert Andrén, Director General at the Swedish Energy Agency, is counting on the project to help fight climate change as it focuses on batteries and electromobility.</div> <div>“Also, it is a big step towards a more sustainable society and more green jobs. In these Corona times, it is especially important that we support this type of forward-looking efforts that contribute to a climate-smart restart of society”, he says.</div> <div>Advanced knowledge development is required in the field of electromobility, and in the conditions for translating new insights into innovative solutions. In order to achieve this, close cooperation between academia, research institutes and industry is required.</div> <div> “SEEL has the right conditions to become a world-leading test facility for electromobility and thus very important for the vehicle industry’s conversion. SEEL will strengthen the competitiveness of the Swedish automotive industry, and help Sweden to remain at the forefront of innovations in the transport sector”, says RISE CEO Pia Sandvik.</div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">FACTS: SEEL</h2> <div>Swedish Electric Transport Laboratory, SEEL, is an electromobility testbed for electric and charging vehicles. The purpose of the initiative is to strengthen the conditions for cooperation within electromobility. Actors in small and medium-sized companies in the automotive industry, the aviation industry and the maritime sector, as well as other companies that develop technology in relevant areas, will have a common platform at SEEL. Researchers at universities and research institutes will also have access to an advanced research infrastructure. SEEL is expected to be operational by 2023.</div> <div>In the summer of 2018, the Swedish Energy Agency was commissioned by the Swedish Government to provide funding of 575 million SEK for the construction of a test center for electromobility. In December 2019, the European Commission approved state support for SEEL within the framework of an IPCEI, i.e. an important project of common European interest, to build a European battery value chain.<br /><br /></div> <div><a href="http://www.energimyndigheten.se/nyhetsarkiv/2020/575-miljoner-kronor-till-testcenter-for-el--och-laddfordon/">Read the full text in Swedish at the Swedish Energy Agency.​</a></div> Wed, 29 Apr 2020 16:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Awarded-efforts-to-save-energy-and-provide-clean-air.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Awarded-efforts-to-save-energy-and-provide-clean-air.aspxAwarded efforts to save energy and provide clean air<p><b>Nanoparticles play a key role in catalysis, which for example is used to clean exhaust gases from our cars. To save energy and provide clean air, it is desirable to understand how the catalytic reactions proceed over the nanoparticles.  In his PhD thesis, Mikkel Jørgensen has developed simulation methods to do so.  Now he receives the Best Thesis Award for his efforts.</b></p>​​<img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/F/750x340/750x340_jacs.png" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:350px;height:159px" /><span style="background-color:initial">Catalysts are composed of nanoparticles that can be used to transform toxic gases into less harmful chemicals. Such a transformation takes place on the surface of the nanoparticle. Since catalysts often are composed of scarce metals, such as platinum, palladium, and gold; even small improvements in efficiency can have huge impacts on a global scale. </span><div><div> </div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"></span></div> <div>“Therefore, understanding how chemical reactions proceed over nanoparticles is an achievement that can have tremendous consequences for global pollution control and chemical technology. Nanoparticles are used in about 90 percent of the chemical industry,” says Doctor Mikkel Jørgensen.</div> <div> </div> <div><br /></div> <div> </div> <div>Today, computers are so powerful that it is possible to perform catalytic experiments solely on the screen. Computer simulations enable researchers to study how different parameters influence the reactions. Such insights may help answer questions on how to arrange and combine the atoms in nanoparticles to design a cheap, efficient, and sustainable catalyst.</div> <div> </div> <div><br />&quot;Mikkel has pushed the boundaries of computational catalysis by making several important contributions. The thesis is a solid and comprehensive piece of work that would not have been possible without his focus and genuine interest to solve difficult problems. I am very happy that it is recognized, “says his supervisor, Professor Henrik Grönbeck at the Department of Physics at Chalmers. </div> <div> </div> <div><br /></div> <div> </div> <div>Mikkel Jørgensen thinks that his work was appreciated because it offers a new approach. </div> <div> </div> <div> “For the first time reaction kinetics is simulated on a full model nanoparticle with realistic parameters, derived from first principles. Moreover, the results show that a systems theory is necessary to understand the nanoparticle catalysts, which is often neglected when modelling such systems.”</div> <div> </div> <div><br /></div> <div> </div> <div><strong>What was the hardest part of the work?</strong></div> <div> </div> <div>“The hardest part of the work was the many hours of tuning simulation parameters and analyzing the many hundreds of gigabytes of data that was generated.  </div> <div> </div> <div><br /></div> <div> </div> <div><strong>… and the best part?</strong></div> <div> </div> <div>“The best part was every time we finally got these &quot;aha moments&quot; from all the data analysis. Another great part was the feeling of everything coming together at the doctoral defense. That day I will always remember, and I feel very grateful for all the people that made it special; in particular my supervisor, Henrik.” </div> <div> </div> <div><br /></div> <div> </div> <div><strong>What piece of advice could you give to future doctoral students?</strong></div> <div> </div> <div>“Rome was not built in one day, but they likely built something every day.” </div> <div> </div> <div><br /></div> <div> </div> <div><strong>What are you up to now?</strong></div> <div> </div> <div>“I currently work with data science and software development in Nordea. That is a super exciting business to be in if you enjoy mathematics and programming, which are some of my favourite topics. I am currently developing software for automatic cash management and forecasting of corporate earnings.”</div> <div> </div> <div><br /></div> <div> </div> <div>Mikkel Jørgensen defended his doctoral thesis at the Department of Physics at Chalmers on 29 March 2019. The title of his thesis is <a href="https://research.chalmers.se/en/publication/508826">Kinetic Simulations of Nanoparticle Catalysis from First Principles.</a> </div> <div> </div> <div><br /></div> <div> </div> <div>The award committee selected his work for several reasons, not least for Mikkel Jørgensen’s pedagogical skills and the impact of his results. </div> <div> </div> <div><br /></div> <div> </div> <div>“The thesis is written in a very pedagogical way, such that a person outside of the catalysis and physical chemistry field could follow and understand both basic and advanced concepts. Moreover, Mikkel’s work has generated a considerable impact due to the substantial amount of high-profile peer-reviewed publications on which the thesis is based,” says Professor Timur Shegai, Chair of the award committee at the Department of Physics at Chalmers. </div> <div> </div> <div><br /></div> <div> </div> <div><strong>Text:</strong> Mia Halleröd Palmgren, <a href="mailto:mia.hallerodpalmgren@chalmers.se">mia.hallerodpalmgren@chalmers.se</a></div> <div> </div> <div><br /></div> <div> </div> <div><strong>Illustration: </strong><span style="background-color:initial">Mikkel Jørgensen​</span></div> <div> </div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"></span></div> <div> </div> <div><br /></div> <div> </div> <div><a href="https://research.chalmers.se/en/publication/508826"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Read Mikkel Jørgensen’s thesis. ​</a></div> <div> </div> <div><br /></div> <div> </div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">The Best Thesis Award at the Department of Physics  </h2> <div> </div> <div>The prize was founded in 2013 and is awarded annually to one or several doctoral students who have defended their thesis during that year. The awarded theses can serve as good examples for doctoral students in the early stages of their own thesis writing.</div> <div> </div> <div>Besides the honor, the winner also gets a diploma and a monetary prize of SEK 10.000. The prize committee consists of researchers from every division within the department. </div> <div> </div> <div>This year's committee consisted of Paolo Vinai, Riccardo Catena, Björn Wickman, Julia Wiktor, Philippe Tassin, and Timur Shegai (Chair).</div> <div> </div> <div><br /></div> <div> </div> <div><span style="color:rgb(33, 33, 33);font-family:inherit;font-size:16px;font-weight:600;background-color:initial">The committee’s full motivation for the award 2019:</span><br /></div> <div> </div> <div>“This year the committee has decided to award Mikkel Jørgensen. He did a great job on studying kinetics of nanoparticle catalysis from first principles. His thesis is well written, there is a coherent flow of information throughout the whole work. The thesis is also written in a very pedagogical way, so that a person outside of the catalysis and physical chemistry field could follow and understand both basic and advanced concepts. Moreover, Mikkel's work has generated a considerable impact due to the substantial amount of high-profile peer-reviewed publications on which the thesis is based. We were particularly impressed by Mikkel's outstanding contributions to these publications (the thesis is based on ten publications, out of which Mikkel is the first author of nine. Eight of the articles are written by only him and his supervisor). Altogether, this made us to choose Mikkel for the best PhD thesis award in 2019. The prize committee sincerely congratulates Mikkel and his supervisor Henrik Grönbeck on this achievement and wishes them success in the future.”</div> <div><br /></div> <div><p style="line-height:28px;word-break:break-word;margin-bottom:32px;font-family:&quot;open sans&quot;, -apple-system, blinkmacsystemfont, &quot;segoe ui&quot;, roboto, helvetica, arial, sans-serif, &quot;apple color emoji&quot;, &quot;segoe ui emoji&quot;, &quot;segoe ui symbol&quot;;font-size:16px"></p> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2"><span>Previous award winners</span></h2> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3"><span>Academic year 2017-2018</span></h3> <div><strong style="background-color:initial">Ferry Nugroho</strong><br /></div> <div><a rel="noopener" href="https://research.chalmers.se/en/publication/502828" target="_blank" title="Research" style="margin-bottom:0px">“Nanoplasmonic Alloy Hydrogen Sensors”</a></div> <div><strong style="color:rgb(33, 33, 33);background-color:initial">Sophie Viaene</strong><br /></div> <div><a rel="noopener" href="https://research.chalmers.se/en/publication/503714" target="_blank" title="Research" style="margin-bottom:0px">&quot;Exploring metamaterial horizons: New concepts and geometrical tools for the description of advanced electromagnetic phenomena&quot;</a></div> <p></p> <p style="line-height:28px;word-break:break-word;margin-bottom:32px;font-family:&quot;open sans&quot;, -apple-system, blinkmacsystemfont, &quot;segoe ui&quot;, roboto, helvetica, arial, sans-serif, &quot;apple color emoji&quot;, &quot;segoe ui emoji&quot;, &quot;segoe ui symbol&quot;;font-size:16px"></p> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3"><span>Academic year 2016-2017</span></h3> <div><strong>Maxime van den Bossche</strong></div> <div><a rel="noopener" href="https://research.chalmers.se/en/publication/248266" target="_blank" title="Research" style="margin-bottom:0px">&quot;Methane oxidation over palladium oxide. From electronic structure to catalytic conversion&quot;</a></div> <p></p> <p style="line-height:28px;word-break:break-word;margin-bottom:32px;font-family:&quot;open sans&quot;, -apple-system, blinkmacsystemfont, &quot;segoe ui&quot;, roboto, helvetica, arial, sans-serif, &quot;apple color emoji&quot;, &quot;segoe ui emoji&quot;, &quot;segoe ui symbol&quot;;font-size:16px"></p> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3"><span>Academic year 2015-2016</span></h3> <div><strong>Greger Torgrimsson</strong></div> <div><a rel="noopener" href="https://research.chalmers.se/en/publication/231389" target="_blank" title="Research">”Pair production, vacuum birefringence and radiation reaction in strong field QED”</a></div> <div><br /></div> <div><span style="color:rgb(33, 33, 33);font-family:inherit;font-size:16px;font-weight:600;background-color:initial">Acad</span><span style="color:rgb(33, 33, 33);font-family:inherit;font-size:16px;font-weight:600;background-color:initial">emic year 2014-2015</span></div> <div><strong>Carl Wadell</strong></div> <div><a rel="noopener" href="https://research.chalmers.se/en/publication/214548" target="_blank" title="Research">”Plasmonic Nanostructures for Optical Absorption Engineering and Hydrogen Sensing”</a></div> <div> </div> <strong> </strong><div><strong>Klara Insulander Björk</strong></div> <div><a rel="noopener" href="https://research.chalmers.se/publication/214924" target="_blank" title="Research" style="margin-bottom:0px">“Thorium fuels for light water reactors - steps towards commercialization”</a></div> <p></p> <p style="line-height:28px;word-break:break-word;font-family:&quot;open sans&quot;, -apple-system, blinkmacsystemfont, &quot;segoe ui&quot;, roboto, helvetica, arial, sans-serif, &quot;apple color emoji&quot;, &quot;segoe ui emoji&quot;, &quot;segoe ui symbol&quot;;font-size:16px"></p> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3"><span>Academic year 2013-2014</span></h3> <div><strong>Erlendur Jonsson</strong></div> <div><a rel="noopener" href="https://research.chalmers.se/en/publication/192854" target="_blank" title="Research">“Ab initio modelling of alkali-ion battery electrolyte properties”</a></div> <div> </div> <div><strong>Daniel Midtvedt</strong></div> <div><a rel="noopener" href="https://research.chalmers.se/en/publication/185848" target="_blank" title="Research">“Nonlinear electromechanics of nanomembranes and nanotubes”</a></div> <div> </div> <div><strong>Mikael Svedendahl</strong></div> <div><a rel="noopener" href="https://research.chalmers.se/publication/197054" target="_blank" title="Research" style="margin-bottom:0px">“Tinkering with Light at the Nanoscale using Plasmonic Metasurfaces and Antennas: From Fano to Function”​</a></div> <p></p></div> <div><div><h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">Read articles about the winners in recent years​:</h2></div> <div></div> <div><span></span></div> <div></div> <div><span></span><span></span><div><a href="/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/They-know-how-to-write-a-doctoral-thesis-with-flow.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />2018: Sophie Viaene and Ferry Nugroh​o: </a><span style="background-color:initial"><a href="/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/They-know-how-to-write-a-doctoral-thesis-with-flow.aspx">Writing a successful PhD thesis: They know how to find the flow</a></span></div> <div><a href="/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Awarded-for-his-work-on-engine-pollution-control.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />2017: Maxime Van den Bossche: Awarded for his work on engine pollution control </a><br /></div> <div><a href="/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Best-Thesis-Award-2016-.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />2016: Greger Torgrimsson​: Greger Torgrimsson wrote the best doctoral thesis​</a></div></div></div> <div> </div></div>Tue, 28 Apr 2020 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/Students-supply-staff-in-the-west-with-visors.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/Students-supply-staff-in-the-west-with-visors.aspxStudents supply staff in the west with visors<p><b>​Companies and private individuals are joining forces to meet the urgent need for personal protective equipment in the healthcare system and in care for the elderly provided by the municipalities. Right now students at Chalmers are coordinating the supply of extra face visors for all of Western Sweden. In the first week the healthcare assistance group at Chalmers, Sjukvårdshjälpen, supplied 2,500 face visors. More are being made this week.</b></p>​​<span style="background-color:initial">Two weeks ago Isak Jonsson, a research engineer at the Department of Mechanics and Maritime Sciences, saw how 3DVerkstan in Stockholm had produced drawings of printed frames. Combining this with standard overhead film, they created a face visor approved for use in healthcare. </span><div><br /><div>Jonsson contacted 3Dteamet, the 3D printing team in the Physics Building – twelve students with the ability to put them into rapid production. Edward Hadziavdic and Marcus Toftås got their group in the Physics laboratory going, with the full support of Lars Hellberg, who is responsible for the Physics Department’s experimental laboratory where much of the equipment is located. Meanwhile Jonsson adjusted the design, making it more robust and more suitable for manufacture and added a support so that it would fit staff with different head sizes. 3Dteamet rewrote the code that everyone is now using.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>On Sunday 29 March Chalmers made an initial test shipment of 230 visors to hospitals in Western Sweden.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>“The region got in touch on Monday and asked us to continue with production of the approved design. We don’t have the capacity to manufacture 100,000, which is what they really need, according to Region Västra Götaland (VGR),” says Hadziavdic, who is now VGR’s contact for the visors and who is coordinating all the new volunteers that offer their services to help tackle the lack of visors in the short term. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>VGR uploaded a direct link to the Chalmers’ team on its website, for anyone who was interested in contributing via their own production. Every day has brought streams of new producers. Toftås rapidly became the ‘production manager’ and is handling the logistics from private producers, other workshops at Chalmers and large industrial companies. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>“Right now we are gathering everything in our laboratory in the Physics Building which is where VGR brings trucks to make collections several times a week,” says Toftås.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Now on the ninth delivery day, VGR has received a total of 2,500 visors from Chalmers, and just as many are in progress or already completed and awaiting collection.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>“We are incredibly grateful for all the hard work that all the volunteers have put in. It is very much appreciated,” says Jonas Anselmby who is coordinating external suppliers in Region Västra Götaland during the COVID-19 outbreak. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>Chalmers appointed a contact for VGR early on in order to help coordinate donations of the personal protective equipment that may be required. In addition to visors, Chalmers has sent lab coats and produced hand sanitiser, mainly from the Chemistry Department. So far several hundred litres of hand sanitiser have been dispatched. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>“A dialogue in currently under way to find out how we can help with other items. I am convinced we can do a lot more than visors,” says Jan Froitzheim, Associate Professor of Chemistry, who is coordinating Sjukvårdshjälpen from Chalmers.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>But visors are what VGR has asked Chalmers to address urgently at the moment, and that is what is being delivered.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>“The last few days have been devoted to making contact with and coordinating across producers. We’re currently working with the majority of manufacturers in Västra Götaland and there are around 250 different producers involved, 50 of which are companies. In addition, we have numerous collaborations under way with further interested parties. This includes everything from the labs here at Chalmers, private individuals and laid-off workers, small companies and larger ones such as both Volvo companies,” says Haziavdic.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Last Thursday a link was established with the group Visor Aid Göteborg, launched by Fredrik Säfsten, which focuses on deliveries to the City of Gothenburg. All production is now being channelled though VGR which has overall regional responsibility for coordinating resources for the municipalities of Western Sweden in connection with the epidemic. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>VGR is of course responsible for the cleanliness of the equipment used, but Sjukvårdshjälpen is trying to assist by adopting strict procedures, cleaning and disinfection, and using sealed packages, before delivering the items.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>“So many people are currently making a heroic effort in a short time frame. But, in parallel with this, we have passed on contacts to VGR to get started with the industrial production of larger volumes in the near future, by working with suitable companies,” says Froitzheim.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Text:</strong> Christian Borg</div> <div><br /></div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">The following are currently providing assistance in producing visors</h3> <div>Around 250 companies and home-based manufacturers are currently involved. At Chalmers the following producers have been mobilised:</div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="https://3dteamet.se/" target="_blank"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />3Dteamet in the Physics Section and GU Physics</a></div> <div><a href="https://x-p.nu/en/" target="_blank"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />XP, the Mechanical Engineering Section’s Workshop Association</a></div> <div><a href="http://tekniskdesign.se/om/resurser/" target="_blank"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />CreaTD, Industrial Design Engineering</a></div> <div><a href="https://chalmersrobotics.se/en/" target="_blank"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Chalmers Robotics Society</a></div> <div><a href="https://www.caselabbet.se/" target="_blank"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />CASE Lab, Department E2</a></div> <div><a href="http://eta.chalmers.se/" target="_blank"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />ETA (E-Sektionens teletekniska avdelning), the electronics and ham radio community​</a></div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">Would you also like to help?</h3> <div>Region Västra Götaland provides a comprehensive Help page setting out how they can accept help here:</div> <div><a href="https://www.vgregion.se/covid-19-corona/vill-du-hjalpa-till/" target="_blank"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Region Västra Götaland: Would you like to help?</a></div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">Läs mer</h3> <div><a href="/en/news/Pages/Volunteers-produce-aprons-for-the-healthcare-system.aspx" target="_blank"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Volunteers produce aprons for the healthcare system​​</a><br /></div> </div>Thu, 09 Apr 2020 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/He-is-one-of-Sweden’s-most-innovative-entrepreneurs.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/He-is-one-of-Sweden%E2%80%99s-most-innovative-entrepreneurs.aspxHe is one of Sweden’s most innovative entrepreneurs<p><b>Simon Isaksson, researcher at Department of Physics at Chalmers, has received ÅForsk’s annual scholarship for entrepreneurs. ​</b></p><div><span style="background-color:initial"><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/F/Blandade%20dimensioner%20inne%20i%20artikel/Simon%20Isaksson_webb.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:280px;height:280px" /><div><span style="background-color:initial">He is one of ten Swedish entrepreneurs selected, and the innovation is named Aquammodate. </span><span style="background-color:initial">The concept is based on a water purification filter with high selectivity and 100 times lower energy consumption. The scholarship of SEK 200,000 aims to support the entrepreneur to realise the business concept. </span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div>“This is really encouraging. Our water treatment membrane will be able to remove even small molecules like pharmaceutical waste and hormone-like substances from the water to be treated,” says Simon Isaksson who is also part of a Chalmers Ventures collaboration. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>Among the ten selected entrepreneurs, <strong>Johanna Nissén Karlsson </strong>and <strong>Wissam Aoudi </strong>also represent Chalmers and Chalmers Ventures. </div> <div><br /></div> <div> <span style="background-color:initial">Text: Mia Halleröd Palmgren, </span><a href="mailto:mia.hallerodpalmgren@chalmers.se">mia.hallerodpalmgren@chalmers.se​</a><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="http://www.mynewsdesk.com/se/sisp/pressreleases/de-aer-sveriges-10-mest-innovativa-entreprenoerer-2020-2987712"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Read the press release about the ten most innovative entrepreneurs 2020.  (In Swedish)</a></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"> </span><br /></div> <div><a href="http://www.aquammodate.com/"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Read more on Aquammodate and the team behind the concept</a>.</div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"> </span><br /></div></span></div> <div><a href="/sv/personal/Sidor/isakssos.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />For more information, please contact Simon Isaksson, researcher, Department of Physics, Chalmers.</a><br /></div>Thu, 02 Apr 2020 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Online-educational-efforts-to-ensure-nuclear-safety.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Online-educational-efforts-to-ensure-nuclear-safety.aspxOnline educational efforts to ensure nuclear safety<p><b>Europe faces a serious shortage of expertise within nuclear safety. Several authorities and organisations have already sounded the alarm about the dangerous lack of competence in this area. Now, the EU programme Euratom is investing around 5 million euros in educating a new generation of researchers and specialists in nuclear technology. Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology are at the heart of the initiative - based on online education.​​​​</b></p><div><div>The programme covers two major educational projects, of which Chalmers will coordinate one and participate as a partner in the other. Both aim to maintain competence in, respectively, reactor physics and nuclear chemistry.</div> <div><br /></div> <img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/F/Blandade%20dimensioner%20inne%20i%20artikel/ChristopheDemazière_20190614_beskuren_200x250.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><div>“If we do not maintain a sufficient level of knowledge and expertise, this could be a safety and security risk. There are more than a hundred nuclear reactors currently operating across Europe, which account for more than 25 percent of all electricity generation,” says Christophe Demazière, Professor at the Department of Physics at Chalmers and coordinator of the EU project Great Pioneer.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>As nuclear power plants are decommissioned, so interest in nuclear technology education has diminished throughout Europe. This has led several authorities and organisations, including the European Commission and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), to sound the alarm that a new generation of qualified researchers and specialists is needed to ensure nuclear safety. The Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM) and the Swedish National Council for Nuclear Waste have voiced similar concerns.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>A report from SSM makes clear the nuclear industry’s great need for more experts in the next fifteen years. There is also a growing need for radiation science specialists, within areas such as healthcare. Within the Swedish nuclear industry and healthcare, a growing proportion of the expert workforce is expected to retire within a few years.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>The same trend is evident throughout Europe. As early as 2012 the Joint Research Center (JRC) warned the European Commission that there would be a shortage of around 7000 reactor physics and nuclear safety specialists by 2020. Since the report was written, several training programmes in the area have disappeared, which has contributed to increasing the shortfall further still.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/F/Blandade%20dimensioner%20inne%20i%20artikel/Modelling%20algorithms_webb.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="background-color:initial" />The teaching of the three-year EU project Great Pioneer is based on innovative and successful methods in active and distance learning. Coordinator Christophe Demazière has developed these methods for many years, in close collaboration with two pedagogical researchers at Chalmers University of Technology’s Department of Communication and Learning in Science: Associate Professors Christian Stöhr and Professor Tom Adawi. Recently, the researchers presented the results of their extensive collaboration in the scientific journal<a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2019.103789"> Computers &amp; Education​</a>. Work will continue within the framework of the new EU project as the education models are now being exported.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>In the coming years, approximately 600 students at universities across Europe will be able to take courses in reactor physics and reactor safety, looking at both theory and practice, programming principles in nuclear safety and using training reactors. The concept is based on the students preparing outside of lectures, so that the teaching time can then be used for joint activities with the students at the centre – whether they are on site or at a distance. A total of nine courses are planned through Great Pioneer, of which Chalmers will produce six.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>The opportunity for distance education is also an important component of the second EU project, in which Chalmers acts a partner.</div> <div><br /></div> <img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/F/Blandade%20dimensioner%20inne%20i%20artikel/Teodora_200221_beskuren200x250.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="" style="margin:5px;background-color:initial" /><span style="background-color:initial"></span><div>“Nuclear engineering programmes are being phased out across Europe, as there are not enough students. Instead of each educational institution trying to offer its own programmes, we will merge and create a sustainable, long-term educational network across Europe,” says Teodora Retegan Vollmer, Professor of Nuclear Chemistry at the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, and Chalmers representative for the EU project A-Cinch.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>She has been working on educational projects in the EU since 2010, when she was one of the initiators of the Cinch concept. The new project includes developments such as virtual laboratory exercises that students can perform remotely. Chalmers also offers unique educational opportunities in the safe handling of meaningful quantities of radioactive materials.  ​</div> <div><br /></div> <div>“Whether you are building or decommissioning nuclear reactors, this training is crucial for being able to do it safely,” says Teodora Retegan Vollmer.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>There has not been a master's degree in nuclear engineering at Chalmers in the last few years, but the two new EU projects evidence how the expertise is in international demand.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>“The goal of the educational projects is to create long-term sustainable education, where we can share both teachers and students, and work with pedagogical methods to improve learning. This is crucial in attracting students and ensuring that the reactors currently in operation can continue to operate safely in the long-term,” says Christophe Demazière.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>The EU decisions on the funded education projects become official once all participants have signed the agreement, which they have already begun to do.</div> <div><br /></div></div> <div><strong style="background-color:initial">Text: </strong><span style="background-color:initial">Mia Halleröd Palmgren, </span><a href="mailto:mia.hallerodpalmgren@chalmers.se">mia.hallerodpalmgren@chalmers.se</a><br /></div> <div><b>Image</b>: Henrik Sandsjö (Christophe Demazière) och Mia Halleröd Palmgren (Teodora Retegan Vollmer).</div> <div><br /></div> <div><h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">The new education projects within the EU: Great Pioneer and A-Cinch​</h2> <div><ul><li><span style="background-color:initial">The training project &quot;GRE @ T-PIONEeR&quot; (Graduate Education Alliance for Teaching the Physics and Safety of Nuclear Reactors) is aimed at master’s students, doctoral students, postdoctoral researchers and nuclear engineers. The concept is based on active learning and the course elements can be followed either on site or at a distance. It is coordinated by Chalmers University of Technology and Professor Christophe Demazière, who since 2017 has also led <a href="http://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Chalmers-gets-5%2c1-M%e2%82%ac-to-improve-nuclear-safety.aspx">the EU project Cortex</a>.</span></li> <li><span style="background-color:initial"></span>A-Cinch (A-CINCH: Augmented cooperation in education and training in nuclear and radiochemistry) will train about a hundred European students and specialists. The project is coordinated by the Czech Technical University in Prague.</li> <li>Both educational programmes run for three years, and consist of theory, practical elements and distance education.</li> <li>The projects have received EU funding under the Euratom work programme 2019-2020 and are part of the Horizon 2020 framework. The consortium of the projects has been granted EUR 2.3 million each for three years (a total of approximately SEK 50 million). Chalmers is awarded SEK 6.3 million for Great Pioneer and just under SEK 3 million for A-Cinch.</li> <li>Ten European partners from seven different countries will participate in Great Pioneer, and eleven countries will participate in A-Cinch.<br /></li></ul></div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">For more information, contakt:</h2> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><strong><a href="/en/staff/Pages/Christophe-Demazière.aspx">Christophe Demazière</a></strong>, Professor, Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, +46 31 772 30 82, <a href="mailto:demaz@chalmers.se">demaz@chalmers.se</a></span><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong><a href="/en/staff/Pages/tretegan.aspx">Teodora Retegan Vollmer​</a></strong>, Professor of Nuclear Chemistry, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, <span style="background-color:initial">Chalmers University of Technology</span><span style="background-color:initial">, +46 </span><span style="background-color:initial">31 772 28 81, </span><a href="mailto:tretegan@chalmers.se">tretegan@chalmers.se​</a></div> <span></span><div></div></div> <div><br /></div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">Further reading: <span>Reports and educational initiatives</span></h2> <div><ul><li>The Swedish Radiation Protection Authority's investigation <a href="https://www.stralsakerhetsmyndigheten.se/globalassets/forskningsfinansiering/grunden-for-en-langsiktig-kompetensforsorjning-inom-stralsakerhetsomradet.pdf">&quot;The basis for a long-term supply of expertise in the field of radiation safety&quot;</a> (In Swedish, 2018)</li> <li><a href="https://ec.europa.eu/research/participants/data/ref/h2020/wp/2018-2020/euratom/h2020-wp1920-euratom_en.pdf">T<span style="background-color:initial">he Euratom programme for 2019-2020.</span></a></li> <li> The Swedish National Council for Nuclear Waste’s report <a href="https://www.karnavfallsradet.se/sou-20209-kunskapslaget-pa-karnavfallsomradet-2020-steg-for-steg-var-star-vi-vart-gar-vi">“The state of knowledge in the nuclear waste area 2020. Step by step. Where are we? Where are we going?”​</a> (In Swedish)<br /></li> <li>The European Commission's report ” <a href="https://ec.europa.eu/jrc/en/publication/eur-scientific-and-technical-research-reports/putting-perspective-supply-and-demand-nuclear-experts-2020-within-eu-27-nuclear-energy">Putting into Perspective the Supply of and Demand for Nuclear Experts by 2020 within the EU-27 Nuclear Energy Sector</a><span style="background-color:initial">” (2012)</span></li> <li><span style="background-color:initial">The FORATOM-ordered report</span> ”<a href="https://www.foratom.org/downloads/nuclear-energy-powering-the-economy-full-study/?wpdmdl=42758&amp;refresh=5cc15b9cd1ec31556175772">Economic and Social Impact Report</a><span style="background-color:initial">” (2019).   </span></li> <li><span style="background-color:initial">Chalmers Professor Christophe Demazière has recently<a href="/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Teaching-the-algorithms-that-are-crucial-for-nuclear-reactor-modelling.aspx"> written a book ​</a>aimed at both future and current engineers in nuclear technology and nuclear safety.​</span></li> <li><span style="background-color:initial">Read more about the pedagogical methods on which Great Pioneer is based, in the scientific article ”<a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2019.103789"> The polarizing effect of the online flipped classroom</a>” I tidskriften Computers &amp; Education (2020).</span></li> <li><span style="background-color:initial">Chalmers has taken the initiative for a knowledge package aimed at secondary schools: <a href="http://www.chalmers.se/sv/nyheter/Sidor/satsning-pa-unga-ska-hejda-kompetenskrisen-inom-framtidsbransch.aspx">&quot;Radiation science for the curious&quot;</a>. The training package has been developed in collaboration with an academic competence center for radiation science, SAINT, and led by nuclear energy researcher <a href="/en/Staff/Pages/klaraib.aspx">Klara Insulander Björk ​</a>at Chalmers’ Department of Physics. Read more about the education initiative here. <a href="https://saint.nu/nyfiken/">Read more about the education initiative here. </a></span></li></ul></div>Thu, 26 Mar 2020 06:00:00 +0100https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Physicist-elected-member-of-the-Royal-Swedish-Academy-of-Sciences-.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Physicist-elected-member-of-the-Royal-Swedish-Academy-of-Sciences-.aspxPhysicist elected member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences<p><b>​Fredrik Höök, Professor of Physics at Chalmers University of Technology, is a new member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. He is one of six new members elected to the Academy and the only one from Chalmers to be selected.​</b></p><div><span style="background-color:initial"><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/F/Blandade%20dimensioner%20inne%20i%20artikel/500px_Fredrik_Hook.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:300px;height:365px" />“I am looking forward to contributing to the important task of the Academy – to promote science and strengthen its role and influence in our society. I am deeply honoured and look forward to exchanging experiences and ideas with the other members when I will be able to meet them,” says Fredrik Höök, Professor and Vice Head of Utilisation at the Department of Physics at Chalmers. </span><br /></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div>Fredrik Höök is conducting research within biological physics and he is the academic leader of the industrial research centre Formulaex. The project focuses on encapsulating biological pharmaceuticals into nanoscale carriers in order to reach the body’s cells and treat severe diseases.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>In his research, Fredrik Höök is studying the role of the cell membrane in cellular communication, which play a key role in many biological processes and diseases. The membrane is essential for the cell’s ability to communicate with its surroundings and is the entry site for viruses. Sometimes particles of membrane can also detach to form “communication capsules”, (microvesicles), which transport molecular information to other cells. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>Fredrik Höök and his research group have developed new methods for microscoping combined with handling small quantities of liquid. One of their main aims is to analyze the microvesicles – exosomes – used by cells to communicate with each other. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>To make maximum use of the sensitive measuring methods, the researchers have designed structures that behave in the same way as cell membranes. This enables them to biophysically study how cell membranes interact with nanoparticles of various kinds, such as viruses and exosomes.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Fredrik Höök’s research group uses artificial cell membranes to carry out in-depth studies of individual nanoparticles that have been attached to the membrane. The researchers also develop a bioanalytical tool capable of measuring the size, structure, and optical properties of individual particles. This will enable the research team to make detailed analyses of complex biological samples, and they also hope to be able to sort nanoparticles according to their properties.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>The aim is to better understand how the nanoparticles work, and what enables them to penetrate the cell. Höök wants to use that knowledge to design artificial exosomes as drug delivery vehicles.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>“Hopefully, this could lead to improved disease diagnostics and inspire new ways of developing and administering medication. Findings from the research may also answer fundamental questions about the properties of nanoparticles and how they interact with cell membranes. This may also be of benefit in the field of nanosafety, and in many other areas,” says Fredrik Höök. </div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="/en/staff/Pages/Fredrik-Höök.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Read more about Fredrik Höök and his research.​</a><br /></div> <div><a href="/en/research/our-scientists/Pages/The-Royal-Swedish-Academy-of-Sciences.aspx" target="_blank"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" /> More Chalmers researchers in the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences​</a><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><div><strong>Text</strong>: Mia Halleröd Palmgren, <a href="mailto:mia.hallerodpalmgren@chalmers.se">mia.hallerodpalmgren@chalmers.se</a></div> <div><strong>Image:</strong> Johan Bodell​<span style="background-color:initial">​</span></div></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><div><h2 class="chalmersElement-H2"><span>Press releases and articles about </span><a href="/en/Staff/Pages/Fredrik-Höök.aspx">Fredrik Höök </a><span>and his research</span></h2></div> <div><div><a href="/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Prestigious-Wallenberg-grant-to-Physics-Professor---.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Physics Professor chosen to be Wallenberg Scholars​​</a><br /></div> <div><a href="/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Investigating-cell-stress-for-better-health-–-and-better-beer.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Investigating cell stress for better health – and better beer</a></div> <div><a href="/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/75-MSEK-for-developing-target-seeking-biological-pharmaceuticals.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />75 MSEK for developing target seeking biological pharmaceuticals</a></div> <div><a href="/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/A-Chalmers-innovation-paves-the-way-for-the-next-generation-of-pharmaceuticals.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Chalmers paves the way for the future of designed pharmaceuticals</a></div> <div><a href="/en/centres/gpc/news/Pages/Portrait-Fredrik-Hook.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Portrait: A matter of life and Science​</a></div></div></div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">All the new members of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences:</h2> <div>At the General Meeting on 11 March Fredrik Höök, Chalmers University of Technology, and Martin Malmsten, University of Copenhagen were elected Swedish members of the Academy’s class for technical sciences, Taija Mäkinen and Staffan Svärd, Uppsala University and Martin Högbom, Stockholm University were elected members of the class for biological sciences and Barbara Canlon, Karolinska Institutet, was elected foreign member of the Academy’s class for medical sciences.</div> <div><div><br /></div> <div><a href="https://www.kva.se/en/nyheter/nya-ledamoter-3"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Read more about the new members of the Academy</a></div></div> <div></div>Fri, 20 Mar 2020 00:00:00 +0100https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/chem/news/Pages/Nanostructured-rubber-like.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/chem/news/Pages/Nanostructured-rubber-like.aspxNanostructured rubber-like material could replace human tissue<p><b>​Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have created a new, rubber-like material with a unique set of properties, which could act as a replacement for human tissue in medical procedures. The material has the potential to make a big difference to many people&#39;s lives. The research was recently published in the highly regarded scientific journal ACS Nano.</b></p><div>​In the development of medical technology products, there is a great demand for new naturalistic materials suitable for integration with the body. Introducing materials into the body comes with many risks, such as serious infections, among other things. Many of the substances used today, such as Botox, are very toxic. There is a need for new, more adaptable materials.</div> <div>In the new study, the Chalmers researchers developed a material consisting solely of components that have already been shown to work well in the body. </div> <div>The foundation of the material is the same as plexiglass, a material which is common in medical technology applications. Through redesigning its makeup, and through a process called nanostructuring, they gave the newly patented material a unique combination of properties. The researchers' initial intention was to produce a h<img class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/KB/Generell/Nyheter/Amferia/Anand%20Kumar%20Rajasekharan%20250.jpg" alt="" style="height:147px;width:180px;margin:10px 5px" />ard bone-like material, but they were met with surprising results. </div> <div>“We were really surprised that the material turned to be very soft, flexible and extremely elastic. It would not work as a bone replacement material, we concluded. But the new and unexpected properties made our discovery just as exciting,” says Anand Kumar Rajasekharan, PhD in Materials Science and one of the researchers behind the study.</div> <div>The results showed that the new rubber-like material may be appropriate for many applications which require an uncommon combination of properties – high elasticity, easy processability, and suitability for medical uses. </div> <div>“The first application we are looking at now is urinary catheters. The material can be construct<img class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/KB/Generell/Nyheter/Amferia/Martin%20Andersson%20172.jpg" alt="" style="height:172px;width:182px;margin:5px" />ed in such a way that prevents bacteria from growing on the surface, meaning it is very well suited for medical uses,” says Martin Andersson, research leader for the study and Professor of Chemistry at Chalmers.</div> <div>The structure of the new nano-rubber material allows its surface to be treated so that it becomes antibacterial, in a natural, non-toxic way. This is achieved by sticking antimicrobial peptides – small proteins which are part of our innate immune system – onto its surface. This can help reduce the need for antibiotics, an important contribution to the fight against growing antibiotic resistance. </div> <div>Because the new material can be injected and inserted via keyhole surgery, it can also help reduce the need for drastic surgery and operations to rebuild parts of the body. The material can be injected via a standard cannula as a viscous fluid, so that it forms its own elastic structures within the body. Or, the material can also be 3D printed into specific structures as required. </div> <div>“There are many diseases where the cartilage breaks down and friction results between bones, causing great pain for the affected person. This material could potentially act as a replacement in those cases,” Martin Andersson continues.</div> <div>A further advantage of the material is that it contains three-dimensionally ordered nanopores. This means it can be loaded with medicine, for various therapeutic purposes such as improving healing and reducing inflammation. This allows for localised treatment, avoiding, for example, having to treat the entire body with drugs, something that could help reduce problems associated with side effects. Since it is non-toxic, it also works well as a filler – the researchers see plastic surgery therefore as another very interesting potential area of application for the new material.</div> <div>“I am now working full time with our newly founded company, Amferia, to get the research out to industry. I have been pleased to see a lot of real interest in our material. It’s promising in terms of achieving our goal, which is to provide real societal benefit,” Anand concludes.</div> <div>Read the study, “<a href="https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acsnano.9b01924">Tough Ordered Mesoporous Elastomeric Biomaterials Formed at Ambient Conditions</a>” in the scientific journal ACS Nano. </div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">The path of the research to societal benefit and commercialisation, through start-up company Amferia and Chalmers Ventures</h3> <div>In order for the discovery of the new material to be useful and commercialised, the researchers patented their innovation before the study was published. The patent is owned by <a href="http://www.amferia.com/">start-up company Amferia</a>, which was founded by Martin Andersson and Anand Kumar Rajasekharan, two of the researchers behind the study, as well as researcher Saba Atefyekta who recently completed a PhD in Materials Science at Chalmers. Anand is now CEO of Amferia and will drive the application of the new material and development of the company. </div> <div><a href="https://www.mynewsdesk.com/se/chalmers-ventures/pressreleases/amferia-raises-sek-6-punkt-2-million-in-investment-for-innovative-wound-care-patches-that-kill-antibiotic-resistant-bacteria-2964059">Amferia has previously been noted for an antibacterial wound patch developed by the same team</a>. Amferia now has the innovation of both the new nano-rubber and the antibacterial wound patch. The development of the company and the innovations' path to making profit are now being carried out in collaboration with Chalmers Ventures, a subsidiary of Chalmers University of Technology.</div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">More about the research: interdisciplinary collaboration at Chalmers</h3> <div>Several of Chalmers’ departments and disciplines were involved in the study. In addition to researchers at the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, <a href="/en/staff/Pages/Marianne-Liebi.aspx">Marianne Liebi</a>, Assistant Professor at the Department of Physics, was a co-author of the article. She has developed a technology to make it possible to investigate the order of materials by means of x-ray irradiation, to see how the nanostructures relate to each other in the material. In the ongoing work, an industrially feasible process for production of the material will be developed. This will be done in collaboration with the Department of Industry and Materials Science.</div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">For more information, contact:</h3> <div><a href="/en/Staff/Pages/Martin-Andersson.aspx">Martin Andersson</a>, Professor in Chemistry</div> <a href="mailto:anandk@amferia.com">Anand Kumar </a><span>Rajasekhara</span>n, PhD in Materials Science and CEO of Amferia <br /><div> </div>Mon, 16 Mar 2020 00:00:00 +0100https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Physics-innovations-in-the-spotlight.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Physics-innovations-in-the-spotlight.aspxPhysics innovations in the spotlight<p><b>An ultrafast nanosensor to minimise the risks of hydrogen, and a sustainable method for removing mercury from contaminated water. When the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering (IVA) presented its 100 list for 2020, two of the selected projects are from the Department of Physics at Chalmers.</b></p><div><span style="display:none"></span><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/F/Blandade%20dimensioner%20inne%20i%20artikel/ChristophLanghammer.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px;height:151px;width:120px" /><div>​Behind the innovations are Christoph Langhammer’s and Björn Wickman's research groups. <span style="background-color:initial">​</span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">“I</span><span style="background-color:initial">t feels great to be presenting a sensor that can hopefully be a part of a major breakthrough for hydrogen-powered vehicles,” says Professor Christoph Langhammer. </span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div>IVA selects current research projects to make it easier for researchers and companies to find each other to create innovation and new business opportunities.</div> <div>This year's list focuses on research that links to sustainability.</div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/F/Blandade%20dimensioner%20inne%20i%20artikel/Bjorn_W.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="" style="margin:5px;height:155px;background-color:initial;width:120px" /><span style="background-color:initial"></span></div> <div>​</div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">“Today, removing low, yet harmful, levels of mercury from large amounts of water is a major challenge. Industries need better methods to reduce the risk of mercury being released in nature,” says </span><span style="background-color:initial">Björn Wickman. ​</span></div></div> <div><br /></div> <div>Text: Mia Halleröd Palmgren, <a href="mailto:mia.hallerodpalmgren@chalmers.se">mia.hallerodpalmgren@chalmers.se​</a></div> <div><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Read more on Björn Wickman's project: </strong></div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">Removing toxic mercury from contaminated water by using electrochemical alloys<span style="background-color:initial;font-size:14px;font-weight:300">​ </span></h3> <span></span><h3 class="chalmersElement-H3"></h3> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3" style="font-family:&quot;open sans&quot;, sans-serif"><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/F/Blandade%20dimensioner%20inne%20i%20artikel/Vattenrening_labbsetup1_webb.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" /></h3> <div>Björn Wickman and his research group are developing a new technique to remove toxic mercury from water. Heavy metals in water sources create enormous environmental problems and influence the health of millions of people around the world. The <span style="background-color:initial">new method makes it possible to reduce the mercury content in a liquid by more than 99 percent. </span><span style="background-color:initial"> </span><span style="background-color:initial">This can bring the water well within the margins for safe human consumption. </span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><div>One strength of the new cleaning technique is that the electrode has a very high capacity. Each platinum atom can bond with four mercury atoms. Furthermore, the mercury atoms do not only bond on the surface, but also penetrate deeper into the material, creating thick layers. This means the electrode can be used for a long time. After use, it can be emptied in a controlled way. Thereby, the electrode can be recycled, and the mercury disposed of in a safe way. The process is very energy efficient and the method is <span style="background-color:initial">selective.</span><span style="background-color:initial"> ​</span></div></span></div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bnJ07l7jL-w&amp;feature=youtu.be"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Watch a video clip with Björn Wickman - explaining the new method. </a></div> <div><a href="/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Removing-toxic-mercury-from-contaminated-water-.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Read the press release ”Removing toxic mercury from contaminated water&quot;.  </a></div> <div>​<br /></div> <div><strong>For more information, contact: </strong></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial;font-weight:700"><a href="/sv/personal/Sidor/Björn-Wickman.aspx">Björn Wickman​</a></span><span style="background-color:initial">, researcher, Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, +46 31 772 51 79,</span><span style="background-color:initial"> </span><a href="mailto:bjorn.wickman@chalmers.se">bjorn.wickman@chalmers.se​​</a><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong style="background-color:initial">Read more on Christoph Langhammer's project: </strong><br /></div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3" style="font-family:&quot;open sans&quot;, sans-serif">Ultrafast nanosensor to minimise the risks of hydrogen <span style="background-color:initial;font-family:&quot;open sans&quot;, sans-serif;font-size:14px;font-weight:300"></span></h3> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3" style="font-family:&quot;open sans&quot;, sans-serif"><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/F/350x305/Vätgassensor_SV_350x305WEBB.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" /></h3> <div>Hydrogen is a clean and renewable energy carrier that can power vehicles, with water as the only emission. <span style="background-color:initial">Unfortunately, hydrogen gas is highly flammable when mixed with air, so very efficient and effective sensors are needed. </span><span style="background-color:initial"> Therefore, </span><span style="background-color:initial">Christoph Langhammer and his research group have developed the first hydrogen sensor in the world that is</span><span style="background-color:initial"> </span><span style="background-color:initial">capable of detecting 0.1 percent hydrogen in the air in less than a second. The innovation </span><span style="background-color:initial">is based on an optical sensor technique that could increase hydrogen vehicle safety. The sensor could also be of interest for the </span><span style="background-color:initial">chemical industry and help improve medical diagnostics. </span><span></span><span style="background-color:initial">In the long run, the hope is that the sensor can be manufactured in series in an efficient manner, for example using 3D printer technology.</span></div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ey4CiJZcEjg&amp;feature=youtu.be"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Watch a video clip with about the technique (In Swedish)</a></div> <div><a href="/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Worlds-fastest-hydrogen-sensor-could-pave-the-way-for-clean-hydrogen-energy.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Read the press releas</a><a href="/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Worlds-fastest-hydrogen-sensor-could-pave-the-way-for-clean-hydrogen-energy.aspx"><span>e </span>&quot;<span style="background-color:initial"><font color="#5b97bf"><b>World's fastest hydrogen sensor could pave the way for clean energy</b></font></span>”.​</a></div> <div><br /></div> <div><span style="font-weight:700">For more information, contact: </span><strong><br /></strong></div> <div><a href="/sv/personal/redigera/Sidor/Christoph-Langhammer.aspx">Christoph Langhammer</a>, Professor, Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, +46 31 772 33 31, ​ <a href="mailto:clangham@chalmers.se">clangham@chalmers.se</a><br /><a href="mailto:clangham@chalmers.se"></a></div> <div><br /></div> <div><div><a href="/sv/nyheter/Sidor/Forskare-och-naringsliv-fors-samman-av-IVA.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Read about more Chalmers research projects on IVA's 100 list for 2020. </a></div> <div><a href="https://www.iva.se/publicerat/ivas-100-lista-lyfter-forskning-inom-hallbarhet/"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Read the press release from IVA (In Swedish). ​</a></div></div>Mon, 02 Mar 2020 09:00:00 +0100https://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/Two-new-steps-as-the-Chalmers-fence-celebrates-five-years.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/Two-new-steps-as-the-Chalmers-fence-celebrates-five-years.aspxTwo new steps as the Chalmers fence celebrates five years<p><b>​The Chalmers fence at the Gothenburg Horse Show 2020 measures the horse&#39;s jump curve, where the horse has its highest point in relation to the fence. As the Chalmers fence now celebrates its five-year anniversary, two new steps are taken – the technology used will for the first time be based on machine learning, and the previous measurement technology from the fence will move into the Swedish Equestrian Federation&#39;s educational facility Strömsholm.</b></p>​<span style="background-color:initial">The way a horse jumps over a fence differs between both individuals and equipage. Some horses jump off too early or too late, giving the highest point before or after the fence. In an optimal jump, the highest point is just above the fence, meaning the horse used just the right technique and amount of energy for its leap.</span><div><br /></div> <div><strong>First time with machine learning</strong><br /><span style="background-color:initial"></span><div>For this year's fence, the group of students will, for the first time ever, use the Image Processing technique, where a computer is trained through machine learning to detect the horse's hooves in a filmed leap and thereby calculate the coordinates for the highest position in the jump over the fence.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>“This involves some technical difficulties. In previous years, the Chalmers fence has measured one variable at a time. We are measuring both the highest point in a vertical path from the ground, and where that point relates to the fence in a horizontal direction,” says Anna Skötte, student and project manager for the Chalmers fence 2020.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>The Chalmers fence project is run by Chalmers students in collaboration with Gothenburg Horse Show, with the aim of using new smart technology to broaden the knowledge of the horses' jumping technique and thereby provide scientific evidence for sustainable training and competition of horses, as well as breeding. Like last year, the competing riders in the Gothenburg Horse Show are invited to the Chalmers exhibition stand in Scandinavium's foyer to see their own measuring results.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Swedish Equestrian Federation will use the technology​</strong></div> <div>The Chalmers fence project takes yet another new and important step as the combined experience from five years of measurements at the Gothenburg Horse Show will moves into the Swedish Equestrian Federation's riding house Strömsholm. The national team leaders in the Equestrian Association Federation have made a wish list for more developed scientific technology, and Chalmers University of Technology has been asked to engage, together with the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences and the National Horse Industry, and further develop the connected riding house at Strömsholm and supplement with cameras and sensors for biomechanics, among other things.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>What does this collaboration mean for the equine industry and equestrian sports in Sweden?</strong></div> <div>“In the horse world we have a lot of commonly accepted truths that we have not been able to test scientifically. With this collaboration we have that opportunity, so from now on it is only our imagination that sets boundaries,” says Tomas Torgersen, competition manager for the Gothenburg Horse Show.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Daniel Svensson is the head teacher in horse jumping at the Strömsholm Riding School and one of the driving forces behind the collaboration with Chalmers University of Technology.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>What do you hope Chalmers will contribute to the development of Strömsholm's riding house?</strong></div> <div>“Just like national teams in other sports scientifically analyse how they can change their training and achieve better results, we need to examine how the horse behaves, what the riders do and how it affects the horses. Chalmers has developed scientific technology and methods for several years, and we want to share the experience, instead of reinventing the wheel, to investigate what is most favourable to the horse and give the best results in competition,” says Daniel Svensson.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>With the project &quot;<a href="/en/centres/sportstechnology/education/Pages/Tracks-course-Chalmers-Fence.aspx" title="Link to information at chalmers.se">The continuation of the Chalmers fence</a>&quot;, which is part of Chalmers’ new<a href="/en/news/Pages/Tracks-prepares-students-for-the-future.aspx" title="Link to article about Tracks"> educational initiative Tracks</a>, students from different disciplines will continue to develop both new and existing techniques for horse welfare and performance.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><span></span><strong>What significance does the collaboration with Strömsholm have for Chalmers?</strong><span style="font-weight:700"><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/F/Blandade%20dimensioner%20inne%20i%20artikel/MagnusKarlsteen_180130_270x170.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:10px 15px" /></span><strong><br /></strong><span style="background-color:initial">“This means that the technology demo</span><span style="background-color:initial">nstrated at the Gothenburg Horse Show through the Chalmers fence is further developed and given the opportunity to reach into the horse world via Strömsholm. In addition, Chalmers students and alumni will be involved in developing technology that can change equestrian sports at the highest level, in collaboration with people and horses at one of Sweden's finest equestrian facilities, and also at a later stage make the technology available to the ordinary rider,” says Magnus Karlsteen, responsible for the Chalmers fence and Chalmers equestrian sports.</span><strong><br /></strong></div> <div><br /></div></div> <div>Text: Helena Österling af Wåhlberg</div> <div>Photo: Johan Bodell/Mia Halleröd Palmgren/Chalmers</div>Wed, 12 Feb 2020 07:00:00 +0100https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/New-opportunities-for-materials-research-at-Chalmers.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/New-opportunities-for-materials-research-at-Chalmers.aspxNew opportunities for materials research at Chalmers<p><b>The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research (SSF) has decided to extend the funding of the SwedNess research school by 100 million SEK until 2025.</b></p><div><div><span></span><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial">SwedNess is a graduate school for neutron scattering operated by six Swedish Universities, including Chalmers.</span><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">The goal is to educate 20 doctoral students as a base for Sweden's expertise in neutron scattering with respect to the research infrastructure European Spalliation Source (ESS) being built outside Lund right now. </span><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/F/Blandade%20dimensioner%20inne%20i%20artikel/Jan%20Swenson.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="" style="margin:5px;height:100px;width:100px" /><div>&quot;It is important to strengthen the competence in neutron scattering at Chalmers in order to remain successful in materials research and to benefit from ESS,&quot; says Professor Jan Swenson at the Department of Physics at Chalmers, who is SwedNess'  Director of Studies at Chalmers.  </div></div> <div><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="/sv/institutioner/fysik/nyheter/Sidor/Nya-mojligheter-for-materialforskningen-pa-Chalmers.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Read a longer article on Chalmers' Swedish homepage. </a></div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="https://strategiska.se/en/research/ongoing-research/graduate-school-neutron-science/project/8304/"><span><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" /></span>Read more about SwedNess. ​</a></div> <div></div>Fri, 07 Feb 2020 00:00:00 +0100