Success stories

​Devices from Chalmers going to space

metop_sg_240.jpgSchottky diodes fabricated at the Nanofabrication Laboratory at the Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience – MC2 – are becoming important components of the second generation weather satellite space project MetOp. The diodes were delivered to Omnisys Instruments this last May. 

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Using new technology to map signals in the brain

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Sensors based on nanothreads that are superconducting in liquid nitrogen are offering new ways of measuring activity in the brain. In the future, the technique may revolutionize brain research and add to our knowledge of how stress affects us, for example. It will also simplify diagnosis of patients suffering from neurological diseases. Read more
 
 

Cooling graphene-based film close to pilot-scale production

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Heat dissipation in electronics and optoelectronics is a severe bottleneck in the further development of systems in these fields. To come to grips with this serious issue, researchers at Chalmers University of Technology have developed an efficient way of cooling electronics by using functionalized graphene nanoflakes. The results are being published in the renowned journal, Nature Communications, on 29 April. Read more
 

Sights set on record-breaking transmission speed

Work is at fever pitch at the Microwave Electronics Laboratory at MC2. Their goal? To find solutions for high-speed wireless communication. “We’re aiming for record speed in the field,” says Professor Herbert Zirath, head of the research team. Read more


New mm-wave products at SME

(in Swedish)

Vad gör du när din teknik börjar bli gammal och konkurrenterna flåsar dig i nacken? På det anrika mikrovågsföretaget Sivers IMA i Kista letade man upp ett nytt produktområde som passade den unika kompetensen. Valet föll på konvertrar för millimetervågsområdet.s mer


Paving the way for fast low-energy data communications

Fibre-optic cables are revolutionising data communication worldwide. Within three years, Chalmers researchers expect to be able to transfer 100 Gb of data per second in a single fibre with one core, and several terabits per second in a cable with multiple fibres and cores.
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Published: Wed 21 Dec 2016. Modified: Thu 26 Oct 2017