Simulator Maritime Informatics

Maritime informatics - An area on the rise

​During the autumn, Chalmers started a Tracks course in Transport Informatics. At the same time, one of the first books on the subject with a focus on Maritime Informatics was released. A key person in the development of the book is Mikael Lind, visiting researcher at Mechanics and Maritime Sciences.
​Mikael Lind is a senior strategic research advisor at the Swedish Research Institute, RISE, focusing on digital innovation in sustainable transport. Since 2018, he is also a visiting researcher at the Department of Mechanics and Maritime Sciences. He has been highly involved in shedding light upon the area of Maritime Informatics.
 
It's about using digitalisation to support decision-makers in the maritime industry. This emerging field unites practitioners and researchers in helping to improve the efficiency, safety, sustainability and resilience of shipping. Digitization is an opportunity to ensure maritime supply chains being conducted with higher predictability and transparency. 

Decision support for a self-organizing ecosystem

The maritime industry is unique because it is a self-organizing ecosystem, without any operational coordination body, constituted by many autonomous actors acting in competition. Therefore, it's important to address maritime informatics as an independent part, but a subset, of informatics according to Mikael Lind. 

Mikael Lind“By an applied science, both engaging researchers and practitioners joining forces in providing insights, experiences and opportunities for something that is a big concern for everyone; to secure value-added service to the clients of the sector” says Mikael Lind. 

The applications of the research within maritime informatics are many. Mikael Lind exemplifies some of them through enhanced supply chain visibility for the clients of maritime transport chains, enhanced resource optimization for actors across the supply chain, conduction of maritime transports with high capital productivity and energy efficiency, protection of the planet and supporting reliable humanitarian deliveries such as food and medicines. It also means new markets and open innovation as well as third-party initiatives associated with supporting the above. 

With the recently released book Maritime Informatics, Mikael Lind, who acts as editor and co-author of 12 of the book's 23 chapters, wants to offer maritime industry leaders an understanding of the potential of maritime informatics so that they can improve their capital productivity and energy efficiency. The book can also be a support for improving decision-making and provides data analysis staff in the maritime industry with tools for learning to handle, report and analyze spatial time data. It will also be a suitable textbook for students studying maritime informatics. 

The book is co-written by 81 people, out of 47 practitioners and 34 applied researchers, from 20 nations. From Chalmers, Fredrik Olindersson from the Department of Mechanics and Maritime Sciences and Carl Sjöberger from the Department of Technology Management and Economics participates. 

Tracks course in Transport Informatics 

At the same time as the book was released, Chalmers started a new tracks course in Transport Informatics. An initiative that Mikael Lind applauds. 

“I think it is fantastic that Chalmers has taken a prime move to deliver capabilities of digitalization to tomorrow’s needed competencies in transport informatics. This is something that will be required by people that are working within or improving maritime transport operations. As we also know is that 90 percent of the products that we see has been in some transport chain leg been transported by the sea why the enhanced improvement of shipping is something that is of great concern for the many people in the world.” 

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Page manager Published: Tue 15 Dec 2020.