Electric Car

Electric cars may avoid whiplash injuries

​Every day between 30 and 300 people get whiplash injuries. A common cause is when the vehicle has been hit in the rear. Many of these accidents could be avoided by driving an electric car. How this could be done is shown in Adithya Arikere’s PhD thesis.
“In my project, we tried to find novel active safety applications for electrified drivetrains that cannot be achieved or at least performed as well with traditional internal combustion engines” says Adithya Arikere.

Electric drives have a lot of advantages over internal combustion engines. They have fast and reliable response, precise and accurate control, max torque from standstill and more. Some of these can be exploited to achieve novel or improved active safety functionality. 

"A simple example is if you can detect that you are about to be hit from behind and you have the free space in front to accelerate and get out the way, you can do so with an electrified drivetrain" says Adithya Arikere. 

This cannot be done reliably with an internal combustion engine since they have poor low-end torque, large response times and the transmission can be in the wrong gear. But with electric drives which deliver their peak torque at low speeds, have short response times and typically don’t need a transmission, this can be easily and reliably achieved. Adithya Arikere has investigated three scenarios in detail: the rear-end collision, obstacle avoidance with oncoming traffic and intersection accidents. 

"We have found that in each case, the quick and reliable response of electric drives can be used to perform interventions that can avoid or mitigate accidents and yield a significant safety benefit" says Adithya Arikere

Since his project deals with finding novel active safety applications for electrified drivetrains he believes it can make electrified vehicles of the future safer and consequently, also make them more attractive to consumers since these safety functions cannot be achieved with traditional internal combustion engine based vehicles. This in turn could help drive electrified vehicle sales and therefore help mitigate climate change and local emissions.

Adithya Arikere presents his PhD thesis Vehicle Dynamics Control for Active Safety Functions using Electrified Drivelines​ at April 10, 10 AM in KB lecture hall. 
 


 


Published: Thu 05 Apr 2018.