Elise

Electric aviation

​Aviation accounts for 2 per cent of global CO2 emissions, and the proportion is expected to increase to 15–27 per cent by 2050. So, there is a need for alternative sustainable solutions. Elise (Electric Aviation in Sweden) is a research project that has investigated how to plan and utilize electric aircraft in Sweden.
The development of electric aviation is yet in its infancy, but there are already prototypes of electric airplanes flying today. Even though it will take a lot of development before long distance flights can be replaced, this might be a technology that will re-draw the map for transportation. A third of all domestic flights in Sweden are shorter than 400 km. Short-haul flights have been identified as an area where electric airplanes can, not only replace conventional airplanes but also, enable new flight routes to more communities in rural areas. The expansion of new routes can also be a way to sustainably replace transportation on the ground.

Spin-off aviation company

Heart Aerospace is a new small aviation company that is direct spin-off from the research project Elise. Anders Forslund, researcher at Elise, decided to start up the company after receiving funding from the Silicon Valley based Y Combinator. Heart Aerospace are now located in Gothenburg and aims to have a 19-passenger electric airliner certified for commercial flight by 2025 with an operating range of 400 km. 


Anders Forslund

– Sweden has a strong history of research and development in aviation. I think that electric aviation has the potential to be a new big market that can benefit both the climate and Sweden as a country. Norway, where over half of the flights are considered short distance, have decided to electrify all domestic flight before 2040, says Anders Forslund.




About Elise

Elise is a collaboration between Chalmers University of Technology, RISE Viktoria, QRTECH and the Civil Aviation Administration, with a reference group including SAAB, GKN Aerospace, Volvo Cars and Gothenburg City.

Funded by the Swedish innovation agency Vinnova.

Published: Fri 06 Dec 2019.