Simon Ingelsten

A Lagrangian–Eulerian simulation method for viscoelastic flows applied to adhesive joining

Simon Ingelsten, Doctoral Student at Engineering Materials IMS and Fraunhofer-Chalmers Centre defends his doctoral thesis.
A Lagrangian–Eulerian simulation method for viscoelastic flows applied to adhesive joining
Simon Ingelsten, industrial PhD student at the division of Engineering Materials, IMS, working at the Fraunhofer-Chalmers Centre for Industrial Mathematics, will defend his PhD thesis “A Lagrangian–Eulerian simulation method for viscoelastic flows applied to adhesive joining” on May 6th 9.00 in Virtual Development Laboratory (VDL).  In the thesis, a new numerical method to simulate viscoelastic flows is proposed and validated. Viscoelastic flows appear in many interesting industrial applications. Simulation tools can therefore aid virtual product realization and process preparation and, in turn, contribute to more cost efficient and sustainable manufacturing processes. 

Summary
Viscoelastic fluids are complex materials which exhibit the behaviors of both viscous liquids and elastic solid materials. Such materials appear in important industrial processes, such as additive manufacturing, automotive sealing, polymer extrusion and adhesive joining applications. Computer simulations can enable process verification and optimization in a virtual environment. This can reduce the need for time-consuming physical testing and aid the development of sustainable manufacturing processes. However, many of the processes have complex features which make them challenging to simulate. New computational algorithms are therefore called for, which enable simulation of these applications and which can predict the outcome in an efficient, robust and user-friendly manner. 
In this thesis, a new simulation method for viscoelastic fluid flow is presented. While the computational algorithm is generally designed, particular focus is aimed at the viscoelastic flows in adhesive joining applications. The simulation framework is able to simulate for example adhesive extrusion along an industrial robot path, parts assembly and hemming joining. As a result, the research in this thesis can contribute to enable virtual tools for optimization and verification of adhesive joining applications using computer simulations.  

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Page manager Published: Fri 22 Apr 2022.