News: Signaler och system, Electrical Engineeringhttp://www.chalmers.se/sv/nyheterNews related to Chalmers University of TechnologyMon, 15 Oct 2018 13:18:18 +0200http://www.chalmers.se/sv/nyheterhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/e2/news/Pages/Building-a-safer-driverless-future.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/e2/news/Pages/Building-a-safer-driverless-future.aspxBuilding a safer driverless future<p><b>​The future of transport lies in autonomous vehicles and connected infrastructure, but how do we ensure the safety for all road users? At AstaZero, the full-scale test environment for future road safety just outside Borås in western Sweden, a multi-disciplinary innovation team has joined forces to find the answers to this.</b></p>​<span style="background-color:initial">At the <a href="http://www.astazero.com/" target="_blank">AstaZero</a> test track, a mock-up of a city junction has been used to simulate a real-world traffic environment with both autonomous and manually-driven vehicles negotiating with each other and adjusting their speeds in a cross intersection.</span><div><br /></div> <div>The team – made up of innovators and researchers from Ericsson, Chalmers University of Technology, the University of Naples “Federico II” and AstaZero – have used 5G cellular network technology and distributed cloud to exchange safety-critical data between both autonomous and manually-driven vehicles and the road infrastructure.</div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/E2/Nyheter/På%20väg%20mot%20en%20säkrare%20förarlös%20framtid/Paolo_Falcone_350px.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:200px;height:289px" /><br />“Collisions are avoided by arranging the vehicles within a virtual platoon and enforcing inter-vehicle distances such that both side and rear-end collisions are avoided”, says Paolo Falcone, Associate Professor in the Mechatronics research group at Chalmers.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>“Our task has been to develop algorithms for controlling the vehicles”, continues Paolo Falcone, who during the project has supervised a doctoral student and a master´s student from the University of Naples “Federico II”. “These algorithms have then been implemented on the vehicles by help of ReVeRe, Ericsson and AstaZero.”</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Most modern vehicles already have the cellular network technology required to transmit information like position and speed data, but restrictions of traditional radio networks prevent this data from being used in safety-critical applications like avoiding collision.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>By bringing the network much closer to the point of use and leveraging the low-latency power of edge computing, vehicles can communicate this data with each other rapidly and reliably, positioning themselves to avoid collision on the approach to a common intersection. This is opening the possibilities of a much smoother driverless transport network, as well as it is an excellent proof point for using the network in new ways. Not just to communicate, but to help us make better decisions and improve safety.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><div><strong>More about the research</strong></div> <div>The project was conducted from March to June 2018. The researchers had <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nYSXvnaNRK4&amp;feature=youtu.be" target="_blank">experience from a similar project</a>, but did everything from scratch since different control algorithms, communication technology and vehicle platforms were used.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="https://www.ericsson.com/en/cases/2018/asta-zero" target="_blank"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Read more about ”Building a safer driverless future at AstaZero” on ericsson.com</a></div> <div><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>For information, contact</strong></div> <div><a href="/en/Staff/Pages/paolo-falcone.aspx">Paolo Falcone</a>, Associate Professor in the Mechatronics research group at the department of Electrical engineering at Chalmers </div> <div><br /></div></div>Thu, 11 Oct 2018 09:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/e2/news/Pages/Towards-the-full-dimensional-fiber-capacity.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/e2/news/Pages/Towards-the-full-dimensional-fiber-capacity.aspxTowards the full-dimensional fiber capacity<p><b>​How can the optical fibers that make up today’s Internet be used more effectively? This is going to be investigated by a group of researchers from Chalmers University of Technology in a five-year project. Their research is working toward a scientific breakthrough in the field of optical communication, for which they now have been granted SEK 30.7 million from the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation.</b></p>​<span style="background-color:initial">The backbone of the Internet consists of hundreds of thousands of kilometers of optical fiber, in which enormous amounts of data are transferred around the globe. The demand for data seems to be insatiable and new applications connected to virtual reality (VR), big data, and Internet of things (IoT) are continuously adding to this. While the demand is increasing, the transmission capacity of optical fibers is limited. Moreover, installing and maintaining new fibers is costly and time-consuming. </span><div><br /><span style="background-color:initial"></span><div>“We claim that the optical fibers are vastly underutilized today”, says Professor Henk Wymeersch, leader of the research team. “Our goal is to quantify and demonstrate the fundamental limits of fiber-optical communications. We will address a number of scientific questions ranging from fundamental theory and modeling to component design and integration.”</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Coordination is key</strong></div> <div>In the design of the current transmission schemes, coupling among the physical dimensions of the optical transmission – notably polarization, space, and frequency – is not taken into consideration when transmitting data. Current approaches rely on accessing the physical dimensions separately, while a joint design would allow for more data to be sent over the same physical dimensions. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>Henk Wymeersch describes this using an analogy with cars driving on multiple lanes:</div> <div><br /></div> <div>“If the cars are not coordinated at all, traffic jams and accidents inevitably will occur, that will slow down the traffic and delay everybody in reaching their destination. Similarly, the traffic flow in optical fibers is optimal when the transferred data is coordinated and adjusted across all physical dimensions.”</div> <div><br /></div> <div>“Comparatively little research has previously been conducted in the field of coordinated transmission in fiber optical communication”, Henk Wymeersch says. “The focus has been on the nonlinear high-power regime, while the linear coordinated regime has come back to the forefront, due to recent technological advances, including multi-mode fibers and optical frequency combs. These have made it possible to now move into this direction.” </div> <div><br /></div> <div>The granted money from the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation will be used to obtain the necessary equipment for the experimental part of the project, and to extend the research team, currently consisting of six Chalmers researchers, with about six additional researchers. Collaboration with industry will also play an important role in the project.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Lower costs and higher capacity</strong></div> <div>Not only will this project lead to new and fundamental understanding of transmission over optical fibers, there will be a major cost reduction for society if the present fiber optic links can be utilized more effectively. The knowledge gained in this project can also be transferred to other applications, for example spectroscopy and fiber imaging. Moreover, the work has impact in wireless communications as well, as wireless and optical communications converge. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>“Quantifying and demonstrating the fundamental limits of fiber-optical communications would imply a new era in this field. If we succeed in this, our scientific results will change how current and future fiber-optical communication systems are used and designed”, Henk Wymeersch concludes. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>The looming “capacity crunch” on the Internet would thus be overcome, or at least postponed.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Text: Yvonne Jonsson</div> <div>Photo: Johan Bodell</div> <div><br /></div> <div><div><strong>About the project</strong></div> <div>Title: Unlocking the full-dimensional fiber capacity</div> <div>Research team:</div> <div><a href="/sv/personal/Sidor/henk-wymeersch.aspx">Henk Wymeersch​</a>, Professor at the department of Electrical Engineering, Chalmers</div> <div><a href="/en/staff/Pages/erik-agrell.aspx">Erik Agrell</a>, Professor at the department of Electrical Engineering, Chalmers</div> <div><a href="/en/staff/Pages/Peter-Andrekson.aspx">Peter Andrekson</a>, Professor at the department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers</div> <div><a href="/en/Staff/Pages/Magnus-Karlsson.aspx">Magnus Karlsson</a>, Professor at the department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers</div> <div><a href="/en/staff/Pages/jochen-schroeder.aspx">Jochen Schröder</a>, Senior researcher at the department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers</div> <div><a href="/en/staff/Pages/Victor-Torres-Company.aspx">Victor Torres Company​</a>, Associate Professor at the Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers</div> <div>Grant: SEK 30.7 million over five years</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong><a href="https://kaw.wallenberg.org/en" target="_blank"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />More about the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation​</a></strong></div> <div>The Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation is Sweden's largest private financier of research. In October 2018, the foundation allocates 22 grants for research projects deemed to maintain a high international standard and to have the potential to lead to future scientific breakthroughs. The grants, SEK 640 Million in total, will go towards basic research in medicine, technology and science.</div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">​</span><br /></div></div></div>Tue, 02 Oct 2018 09:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/e2/news/Pages/Sabine-Reinfeldt,-the-first-Henry-Wallman-prize-winner.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/e2/news/Pages/Sabine-Reinfeldt,-the-first-Henry-Wallman-prize-winner.aspxSabine Reinfeldt, the first Henry Wallman prize winner<p><b>​Sabine Reinfeldt is awarded the newly established prize in medical technology, in the spirit of Henry Wallman, for her research on bone conduction, and for her ability to build bridges between disciplines.</b></p>​<span style="background-color:initial">​Sabine Reinfeldt, Associate Professor and leader of the research group Biomedical Signals and Systems at Chalmers University of Technology, </span><a href="/en/departments/e2/calendar/Pages/Prize-ceremony-for-the-Henry-Wallman-prize.aspx">received the prize at a ceremony at Sahlgrenska University Hospital on 19 September​</a><span style="background-color:initial">. We got the chance to ask Sabine some questions:</span><div><br /></div> <div><div><strong>What does this prize mean to you?</strong></div> <div>“It means a lot to me! I am very honored and pleased to receive it. I see the prize as an acknowledgement that my work is important and that it is well received. Also, I want to say that I feel very humble, because when I started doing my research, I became a part of already existing multidisciplinary collaborations, and my prerequisites to continue collaborating have been most favorable. To receive a prize in Henry Wallman’s spirit is a great honor, and I am very glad that my group’s research is being recognized in this positive way.”</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>You receive the prize also for your great ability to build bridges between disciplines. Why is cooperation a success factor in research, and what is the key to build well-functioning multidisciplinary teams?</strong></div> <div>“We need to realize that within one discipline, we would never be able to solve the challenges in society, for example in healthcare. We need to cooperate over disciplines to complement each other with our different backgrounds. It is essential to listen to each other’s experiences and knowledge, and to be open minded for new solutions. To develop medical devices that are safe and effective for the patients would never be possible without multidisciplinary collaboration.” </div> <div>“In my opinion, the key to build well-functioning multidisciplinary teams is to include highly motivated people who all have a passion for solving the same problem. Commitment is one key, and that the team members listen to the others. It is necessary to respect the other disciplines and the fact that they have knowledge that complement your own.”</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Which is the next step in your research?</strong></div> <div>“In our multicenter clinical study of the <a href="http://www.mynewsdesk.com/uk/chalmers/pressreleases/new-implant-replaces-impaired-middle-ear-827637" target="_blank">Bone Conduction Implant (BCI)</a>, we have 16 patients with hearing impairment, who have had the implant between nearly two and six years now. In extensive measurements, we are following up their performance in for example audiometric and electrical transmission tests, and we are now in the middle of several three-year and five-year visits. There are still areas involving these patients to be investigated, for example in directional hearing. Are there differences between different types of bone conduction devices? Also, could the attachment and size of the implant affect the outcome?”</div> <div>“In an adjacent field, which we are now moving into, <a href="/en/departments/e2/news/Pages/New-innovation-improves-the-diagnosis-of-dizziness.aspx">bone conduction can be used to diagnose dizziness</a>. Bone conduction has been used before, but not in clinical practice, since today’s bone conduction transducers cannot produce the level needed at the frequency of interest. With a new transducer, which is still a prototype, our preliminary tests show that more patient groups can be diagnosed, and the new method would be more comfortable for the patients. I see several research areas within balance, dizziness and hearing diagnostics where we can contribute with our competence.” </div> <div><br /></div> <div>Read an interview with Sabine Reinfeldt, from April 2018: </div> <div><a href="/en/departments/e2/news/Pages/Bridge-builder-awarded-new-prize-in-medical-technology.aspx">Bridge builder awarded new prize in medical technology</a></div> <div><br /></div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/E2/Nyheter/Sabine%20Reinfeldt%20först%20att%20få%20Henry%20Wallman-priset/Prisutdelning_500px.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="Prize ceremony" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><em style="background-color:initial">The prize winner Sabine Reinfeldt accompanied by Bo Håkansson, Bengt-Arne Sjöqvist and Kaj Lindecrantz</em><span style="background-color:initial">.</span><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>About the prize</strong></div> <div>The Henry Wallman prize is an innovation prize in medical technology, which from 2018 will be awarded annually, to young researchers or graduate students who, in close collaboration between expertise in technology and health care, successfully have transferred new knowledge from academia to practical medical care. The Foundation for Biomedical Engineering (Stiftelsen Medicin &amp; Teknik) at Chalmers is hosting the prize. The scholarship amounts to SEK 50,000.</div> <div>Henry Wallman came to Chalmers in 1948 and was a pioneer in biomedical engineering research and development.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Contact</strong></div> <div><a href="/en/staff/Pages/sabine-reinfeldt.aspx">Sabine Reinfeldt</a>, Associate Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering, Chalmers</div> <div><a href="mailto:%20sabine.reinfeldt@chalmers.se">sabine.reinfeldt@chalmers.se</a></div> <div><br /></div> <div>Photo: Helene Lindström, MedTech West</div></div> ​Fri, 21 Sep 2018 08:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/e2/news/Pages/New-innovation-improves-the-diagnosis-of-dizziness.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/e2/news/Pages/New-innovation-improves-the-diagnosis-of-dizziness.aspxNew innovation improves the diagnosis of dizziness<p><b>​Half of over-65s suffer from dizziness and problems with balance. But some tests to identify the causes of such problems are painful and can risk hearing damage. Now, researchers from Chalmers have developed a new testing device using bone conduction technology, that offers significant advantages over the current tests.​</b></p>​<span style="background-color:initial">Hearing and balance have something in common. For patients with dizziness, this relationship is used to diagnose issues with balance. Commonly, a ‘VEMP’ test (Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials) needs to be performed. A VEMP test uses loud sounds to evoke a muscle reflex contraction in the neck and eye muscles, triggered by the vestibular system – the system responsible for our balance. The Chalmers researchers have now used bone conducted sounds to achieve better results.</span><div><br /></div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/E2/Nyheter/Ny%20metod%20ger%20bättre%20diagnos%20för%20yrsel/bo_hakansson_200px.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="Bo Håkansson" style="margin:5px" />&quot;We have developed a new type of vibrating device that is placed behind the ear of the patient during the test,&quot; says Bo Håkansson, a professor in the research group 'Biomedical signals and systems' at Chalmers. The vibrating device is small and compact in size, and optimised to provide an adequate sound level for triggering the reflex at frequencies as low as 250 Hz. Previously, no vibrating device has been available that was directly adapted for this type of test of the balance system.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>In bone conduction transmission, sound waves are transformed into vibrations through the skull, stimulating the cochlea within the ear, in the same way as when sound waves normally go through the ear canal, the eardrum and the middle ear.<a href="http://www.mynewsdesk.com/uk/chalmers/pressreleases/new-implant-replaces-impaired-middle-ear-827637"> Bo Håkansson has over 40 years of experience in this field and has previously developed hearing aids using this technology.</a></div> <div><br /></div> <div><br />Half of over-65s suffer from dizziness, but the causes can be difficult to diagnose for several reasons. In 50% of those cases, dizziness is due to problems in the vestibular system. But today's VEMP methods have major shortcomings, and can cause hearing loss and discomfort for patients. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>For example, the VEMP test uses very high sound levels, and may in fact cause permanent hearing damage itself. And, if the patient already suffers from certain types of hearing loss, it may be impossible to draw any conclusions from the test. The Chalmers researchers’ new method offers significant advantages.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/E2/Nyheter/Ny%20metod%20ger%20bättre%20diagnos%20för%20yrsel/Karl-Johan_Freden_Jansson_200px.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" />&quot;Thanks to this bone conduction technology, the sound levels which patients are exposed to can be minimised. The previous test was like a machine gun going off next to the ear – with this method it will be much more comfortable. The new vibrating device provides a maximum sound level of 75 decibels. The test can be performed at 40 decibels lower than today's method using air conducted sounds through headphones. This eliminates any risk that the test itself could cause hearing damage,” says postdoctoral researcher Karl-Johan Fredén Jansson, who made all the measurements in the project.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>The benefits also include safer testing for children, and that patients with impaired hearing function due to chronic ear infections or congenital malformations in the ear canal and middle ear can be diagnosed for the origin of their dizziness.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>The vibrating device is compatible with standardised equipment for balance diagnostics in healthcare, making it easy to start using. The cost of the new technology is also estimated to be lower than the corresponding equipment used today.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>A pilot study has been conducted and recently published. The next step is to conduct a larger patient study, under a recently received ethical approval, in collaboration with Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Gothenburg, where 30 participants with normal hearing will also be included.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><h5 class="chalmersElement-H5">More about the research</h5> <div><span style="background-color:initial">The scientific article <a href="https://www.dovepress.com/articles.php?article_id=40371" target="_blank">&quot;VEMP using a new low-frequency bone conduction transducer&quot;</a> has recently been published by Dove Medical Press, in the journal Medical Devices: Evidence and Research.</span><br /></div> <div>Chalmers’ partners in the study are the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, and the Danish audio companies Ortofon and Interacoustics. Grants for this project are received from Vinnova (Swedish Innovations Agency) and Hörselskadades Riksförbund (Hearing Impairment Federation).</div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="https://youtu.be/qrWnXgTP2vs" target="_blank"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />See the researchers' own presentation of the project</a></div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="/en/departments/e2/research/Signal-processing-and-Biomedical-engineering/Pages/Biomedical-signals-and-systems.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Read more about research on medical signals and systems</a></div> <div><br /></div> <h5 class="chalmersElement-H5">More about Diagnostics for Dizziness</h5> <div>A common method of diagnosing the cause of dizziness is a VEMP test – Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials. The test uses sound stimulation to evoke a muscle contraction in the neck and eye muscles, triggered by a reflex from the vestibular system – the system that is responsible for our sense of balance. The muscular response is measured and provides you information on whether the disorders responsible for the patient’s dizziness are in the vestibular system, or in its pathways to the brain.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>In a traditional vestibular investigation, two variants of VEMP tests are used today: air transmitted sound through headphones or bone conducted sounds via a vibrating device attached to the head. When air transmitted sounds are used, high sound levels are required, which is uncomfortable to the patient and there is a risk of hearing damage. For bone conducted sound, the sound levels are lower, but the equipment currently available on the market is large and cumbersome, and therefore difficult to use. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>The new method uses new transducer technology, is smaller in size and generates bone conducted sound at a lower frequency than has been possible before (around 250 Hz). At this level, the muscle reflexes are more efficiently evoked. <span style="background-color:initial">The muscle contractions in both the neck and the eye muscles are measured using fairly standardised equipment, so it should be easy to start incorporating it into healthcare systems.</span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/E2/Nyheter/Ny%20metod%20ger%20bättre%20diagnos%20för%20yrsel/yrsel_500px.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><div><span style="background-color:initial">Bo Håkansson, Professor of Electrical Engineering, undergoes testing using the new compact vibrating device he and the team helped design. </span><span style="background-color:initial">​</span><br /></div></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><h5 class="chalmersElement-H5">​<span>For more information contact</span></h5></div> <div><strong><a href="/sv/personal/Sidor/bo-hakansson.aspx">Bo Håkansson</a></strong>, Professor in Biomedical Engineering at the Department of Electrical Engineering at Chalmers,</div> <div>031-772 18 07, <a href="mailto:%20boh@chalmers.se">boh@chalmers.se</a></div> <div><strong><a href="/en/staff/Pages/karl-johan-freden-jansson.aspx">Karl-Johan Fredén Jansson</a></strong>, Postdoctoral researcher at the Department of Electrical Engineering at Chalmers and in charge of clinical studies, 031-772 17 83, <a href="mailto:%20karljohf@chalmers.se​">karljohf@chalmers.se</a></div> <div><br /></div> <div>​<br /></div></div> <div>Text: Yvonne Jonsson</div> <div>Translation: Joshua Worth<br />Photo: Johan Bodell</div> <div><br /></div>Mon, 10 Sep 2018 07:30:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/Transport/news/Pages/CEVT-and-Chalmers-become-strategic-partners.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/Transport/news/Pages/CEVT-and-Chalmers-become-strategic-partners.aspxCEVT and Chalmers become strategic partners<p><b>​Chalmers University of Technology and vehicle developer CEVT have signed a ten-year strategic partnership agreement. The goal is to ensure long-term supply of well-educated engineers as well as efficient research.</b></p>​On September 7, Chalmers President Stefan Bengtsson and CEVT CEO Mats Fägerhag met at Lindholmen, Gothenburg,  to sign the agreement.<br /><br />“The collaboration between CEVT and Chalmers is an investment for the future. I see it as a very important strategic step in strengthening Chalmers, CEVT and the business community in western Sweden, since knowledge, competence building and research and development are the keys to success,” says Mats Fägerhag.<br /><br /><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Areas%20of%20Advance/Transport/_bilder-utan-fast-format/CEVT_Avtal_189807_06_350x305px.jpg" alt="Audio description: Decorative image" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" style="margin:5px" />CEVT and Chalmers aim to jointly develop and strengthen education, research and innovation in a number of priority areas. These include self-driving cars, sustainable mobility, artificial intelligence and cyber security. The vehicle developer plans to have up to four industry doctoral students per year linked to Chalmers and the proportion of Chalmers students who do their degree projects at CEVT will also increase.<br /><br />“For us as a university, the agreement is particularly valuable in areas such as self-driving electric vehicles and artificial intelligence. It is all about defining relevant research questions and ensuring opportunities for our students - both during and after their studies,” says Stefan Bengtsson.<br /><br />Chalmers now has official partnership agreements with fourteen different companies.<br /><br />“The agreement with CEVT represents an interesting broadening of our partner agreements. We are developing in collaboration with a fast-growing player in the automotive industry, which strengthens both Chalmers and the west Swedish automotive industry, as I see it,” says Stefan Bengtsson.<br /><br /><div>The collaboration will ultimately be governed by an annual management conference where representatives of Chalmers and CEVT will meet to evaluate and define relevant areas of collaboration. At Chalmers, the commitment will be coordinated by the Transport Area of Advance.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><em>Text: Emilia Lundgren</em></div> <div><em>Photo: Johan Bodell</em><br /></div> <br /><strong>FACTS</strong><br />The vehicle developer CEVT (China Euro Vehicle Technology) is owned by Zhejiang Geely Holding Group, which also owns Lynk &amp; Co, Volvo Cars, Polestar and Lotus, among others. The company has about 2 000 employees and has offices in Gothenburg and Trollhättan. Read more: <a href="https://www.cevt.se/">https://www.cevt.se/</a><br /> <br /><a href="https://research.chalmers.se/organisation/?tab=projects&amp;query=cevt"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Ongoing collaboration between Chalmers and CEVT</a><br /><br />Fri, 07 Sep 2018 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/e2/news/Pages/A-new-theory-for-phantom-limb-pain-points-the-way-to-more-effective-treatment.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/e2/news/Pages/A-new-theory-for-phantom-limb-pain-points-the-way-to-more-effective-treatment.aspxA new theory for phantom limb pain points the way to more effective treatment<p><b>​Dr Max Ortiz Catalan at Chalmers has developed a new theory for the origin of the mysterious condition, ‘phantom limb pain’. Published in the journal Frontiers in Neurology, his hypothesis builds upon his previous work on a revolutionary treatment for the condition, that uses machine learning and augmented reality.​</b></p>​<span style="background-color:initial">Phantom limb pain is a poorly understood phenomenon, in which people who have lost a limb can experience severe pain, seemingly located in that missing part of the body. The condition can be seriously debilitating and can drastically reduce the sufferer’s quality of life. But current ideas on its origins cannot explain clinical findings, nor provide a comprehensive theoretical framework for its study and treatment. </span><div><br /><span style="background-color:initial"></span><img class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="Max Ortiz Catalan" src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/E2/Nyheter/Ny%20teori%20om%20fantomsmärtor%20visar%20vägen%20mot%20effektivare%20behandling/max_ortiz_catalan_250px.jpg" style="margin:5px" /><div>​Now, Max Ortiz Catalan, Associate Professor at the Department of Electrical Engineering, has published a paper that offers up a promising new theory – one that he terms ‘stochastic entanglement’. </div> <div> </div> <div>He proposes that after an amputation, neural circuitry related to the missing limb loses its role and becomes susceptible to entanglement with other neural networks – in this case, the network responsible for pain perception. </div> <div><br />“Imagine you lose your hand. That leaves a big chunk of ‘real estate’ in your brain, and in your nervous system as a whole, without a job. It stops processing any sensory input, it stops producing any motor output to move the hand. It goes idle – but not silent,” explains Max Ortiz Catalan. </div> <div> </div> <div>Neurons are never completely silent. When not processing a particular job, they might fire at random. This may result in coincidental firing of neurons in that part of the sensorimotor network, at the same time as from the network of pain perception. When they fire together, that will create the experience of pain in that part of the body.</div> <div> </div> <div>“Normally, sporadic synchronised firing wouldn’t be a big deal, because it’s just part of the background noise, and it won’t stand out,” continues Max Ortiz Catalan. “But in patients with a missing limb, such event could stand out when little else is going on at the same time. This can result in a surprising, emotionally charged experience – to feel pain in a part of the body you don’t have. Such a remarkable sensation could reinforce a neural connection, make it stick out, and help establish an undesirable link.”</div> <div> </div> <div>Through a principle known as ‘Hebb’s Law’ – ‘neurons that fire together, wire together’ – neurons in the sensorimotor and pain perception networks become entangled, resulting in phantom limb pain. The new theory also explains why not all amputees suffer from the condition– the randomness, or stochasticity, means that simultaneous firing may not occur, and become linked, in all patients.</div> <div> </div> <div>In the new paper, Max Ortiz Catalan goes on to examine how this theory can explain the effectiveness of Phantom Motor Execution (PME), <a href="http://www.mynewsdesk.com/uk/chalmers/pressreleases/phantom-movements-in-augmented-reality-helps-patients-with-chronic-intractable-phantom-limb-pain-1670596" target="_blank">the novel treatment method he previously developed​</a>. During PME treatment, electrodes attached to the patient’s residual limb pick up electrical signals intended for the missing limb, which are then translated through AI algorithms, into movements of a virtual limb in real time. <span style="background-color:initial">The patients see themselves on a screen, with a digitally rendered limb in place of their missing one, and can then control it just as if it were their own biological limb. This allows the patient to stimulate and reactivate those dormant areas of the brain.​ </span></div> <div><img class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="Treatment of phantom limb pain" src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/E2/Nyheter/Ny%20teori%20om%20fantomsmärtor%20visar%20vägen%20mot%20effektivare%20behandling/PME_500px.jpg" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /></div> <em> </em><div><br /> </div> <em> </em><div><br /> </div> <em> </em><div><br /> </div> <em> </em><div><br /> </div> <em> </em><div><br /> </div> <em> </em><div><br /> </div> <em> </em><div><em style="background-color:initial"><br /></em></div> <div><em style="background-color:initial">The patient, missing his right arm, can see himself on screen in augmented reality, with a virtual limb. He can control it through the electrodes attached to his skin, which in this treatment called Phantom Motor Execution allows the patient to stimulate and reactivate those dormant areas of the brain. Source: Catalan, Frontiers in Neurology, 2018</em><br /></div> <div> </div> <div>“The patients can start reusing those areas of brain that had gone idle. Making use of that circuitry helps to weaken and disconnect the entanglement to the pain network. It’s a kind of ‘inverse Hebb’s law’ – the more those neurons fire apart, the weaker their connection. Or, it can be used preventatively, to protect against the formation of those links in the first place,” he says. </div> <div> </div> <div>The PME treatment method has been previously shown to help patients for whom other therapies have failed. Understanding exactly how and why it can help is crucial to ensuring it is administered correctly and in the most effective manner. Max Ortiz Catalan’s new theory could help unravel some of the mysteries surrounding phantom limb pain, and offer relief for some of the most affected sufferers.</div> <div> </div> <div><h4 class="chalmersElement-H4">More Information</h4> <h5 class="chalmersElement-H5">Phantom Motor Execution undergoing global trial</h5> <div> <span style="background-color:initial">Dr Max Ortiz Catalan developed Phantom Motor Execution (PME) as a treatment for phantom limb pain, in which phantom movements are decoded from the residual limb using machine learning, and then visualised via virtual and augmented reality. The new hypothesis provides an explanation for the clinical successes observed for this therapy. PME has been shown to reduce phantom limb pain in chronic sufferers, for whom other treatments failed. At present, PME is being tested in clinics around the world, from Canada to Australia, with the majority of patients treated in Europe. A device allowing for this treatment is being commercialized by Integrum AB, a Swedish medical device company, and a large international clinical trial in 7 countries is currently in progress. On-going brain imaging studies on these patients treated with PME will support or challenge Max Ortiz Catalan’s theories. </span></div> <div> </div> <div>See a <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ek7JHGC-T4E&amp;feature=youtu.be" target="_blank">video presentation of Phantom Motor Execution in action</a>.​</div></div> <div> </div> <div><h5 class="chalmersElement-H5">More on the research</h5> <div>Dr Max Ortiz Catalan is an Associate Professor at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, and head of <a href="http://www.bnl.chalmers.se/wordpress/" target="_blank">the Biomechatronics and Neurorehabilitation Laboratory</a>. </div> <div>He has previously attracted international attention, for his pioneering work on osseointegrated bionic limbs, published in <a href="http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/6/257/257re6" target="_blank">Science Translational Medicine</a>, and for his Phantom Motor Execution treatment for phantom limb pain, published in <a href="https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736%2816%2931598-7/abstract" target="_blank">The Lancet</a>. </div> <div>His new paper, <a href="https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fneur.2018.00748/abstract" target="_blank">‘The stochastic entanglement and phantom motor execution hypotheses: a theoretical framework for the origin and treatment of PLP’</a> is published in the journal Frontiers of Neurology. </div></div> <div> </div> <div><h5 class="chalmersElement-H5">Contact information</h5> <div>Max Ortiz Catalan, Department of Electrical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, +46 70 846 10 65, <a href="mailto:maxo@chalmers.se">maxo@chalmers.se</a></div> <div> </div> <div>Visit the<a href="http://www.bnl.chalmers.se/wordpress/" target="_blank"> Biomechatronics and Neurorehabilitation Laboratory website</a>. </div></div> <div>​<span style="background-color:initial">​Read more about Chalmers´reserach on </span><a href="/en/departments/e2/research/Signal-processing-and-Biomedical-engineering/Pages/Biomedical-signals-and-systems.aspx">Biomedical signals and systems​</a></div> <div><br /></div> <div> </div> <div><div>Text: Joshua Worth</div> <div>Photo of Max Ortiz Catalan: Oscar Matsson​</div></div> </div> ​​Thu, 06 Sep 2018 07:30:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/e2/news/Pages/Unique-energy-system-is-being-tested-at-Chalmers.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/e2/news/Pages/Unique-energy-system-is-being-tested-at-Chalmers.aspxUnique energy system is being tested at Chalmers<p><b>​This week, for the first time, a unique local marketplace for electricity, heat and cooling is being tested at Chalmers University of Technology, campus Johanneberg. The EU funded initiative is a collaboration between nine local partners and is being held to find new ways towards a fossil-free energy supply system at international level.​</b></p>​The Fossil-free Energy Districts (FED) project has been running for a year and a half, and now the digital, IoT-based marketplace is ready to be connected to campus buildings and tested in a sharp spot. The idea is that buildings that both consume and in some cases produce energy should communicate with each other to avoid energy consumption peaks that are both expensive and bad for the environment.<br /><br />– FED's marketplace is unique in several ways, partly because it connects both electricity, heat and cooling, and partly because it allows smaller players, such as a property owner who has installed solar panels on the roof, to participate in energy trading. At the same time, the system is connected to the larger external network, in our case Göteborg Energi, which provides cover when needed, says Claes Sommansson, FED Project Manager at Johanneberg Science Park.<br /><br />The FED system handles large amounts of data, both from property owners own systems and information such as weather and electricity pricing, and is updated hour by hour. But it is not the property owners themselves who have to process the information. This work is done by smart digital agents who make decisions to optimize energy efficiency in the area. The AI agents are programmed by Ericsson and based on machine learning, which means that they will get better at their job over time.<br /><br /><div>– The biggest advantage of FED is that it's a flexible system and that's something we'll need in the future when the share of energy from renewable sources, like solar and wind, grows. The uneven supply of these sources causes price fluctuations to grow, but the agents in the FED system can for example predict a cold spell and decide to start heating a house before it happens. In this way, you can buy energy at a lower price, before demand increases, but you also avoid burning fossil fuels like gas and oil, says Ericsson's Joakim Pontén, who has been in charge of the IT solution within FED.</div> <div><br />Researchers at Chalmers have done simulations and analysis to build the models that will make the energy system and the marketplace work. <a href="/en/departments/e2/news/Pages/Chalmers-is-becoming-a-unique-marketplace-for-energy.aspx">Read more about the work of the researchers.</a><br /></div> <br />The two property owners at Chalmers, Akademiska Hus and Chalmersfastigheter, are obvious partners in the project, and together they are making significant investments that will be rolled out in the autumn, including several new solar cells and a large battery for storing solar power. The entire FED system is expected to be operational at the end of the year, and the tests being carried out now are an important milestone.<br /><br />– A major challenge has been to connect the property owners' systems with Ericsson and Göteborg Energi's systems. The test week we are now completing is confirmation that our property systems linked to the parent FED marketplace are working well, says Per Löveryd, Innovation Coordinator at Akademiska Hus. <div><img class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="Joakim Pontén and Per Löveryd" src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/E2/Nyheter/Chalmers%20blir%20unik%20handelsplats%20för%20energi/FED-Per-Löveryd-Joakim-Ponten_500px.jpg" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><div><br /></div> <div>Joakim Pontén, Ericsson and Per Löveryd, Akademiska Hus. <br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Facts about the project</strong></div> <div>The Fossil-free Energy Districts project, FED, is an innovative effort by the City of Gothenburg to decrease the use of energy and the dependence on fossil fuel in a built environment. A unique local marketplace for electricity, district heating and cooling is being developed together with nine strong partners. The City of Gothenburg, Johanneberg Sciene Park, Göteborg Energi, Business Region Göteborg, Ericsson, RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Akademiska Hus, Chalmersfastigheter and Chalmers University of Technology are all contributing with their expertise and knowledge to make FED attractive for other European cities as well. Johanneberg Science Park has the coordinating role on behalf of the city. During 2017−2019 the FED testbed will be situated on Chalmers Campus Johanneberg. FED is co-financed by the European Regional and Development Fund through the Urban Innovative Actions Initiative, an initiative of the European Commission for cities to test new solutions for urban challenges.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Read more:<br /><a href="https://www.johannebergsciencepark.com/en/projects/fed-fossil-free-energy-districts" target="_blank">About FED on the Johanneberg Science Park website</a><br /><a href="http://www.uia-initiative.eu/en/uia-cities/gothenburgiencepark.com/fed" target="_blank">About FED in Urban Innovative Actions</a><br /><br /></div></div>Wed, 27 Jun 2018 13:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/e2/news/Pages/Shrinking-power-electronics-in-propulsion-project.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/e2/news/Pages/Shrinking-power-electronics-in-propulsion-project.aspxShrinking power electronics in propulsion research project<p><b>​Energimyndigheten, the Swedish Energy Agency, has granted CEVT and Chalmers with 12 MSEK for a development within propulsion technology.</b></p>​<span style="background-color:initial">The project is called iTEM - integrated Transmission and Electric Machine, and is focused within the field of power electronics. The project will develop a transmission with an integrated e-drive with strongly integrated controls. </span><div><br /><span style="background-color:initial"></span><div>The main goal is to contribute to a better environment globally by developing a hybrid driveline, which makes electric propulsion both affordable and attractive to a wide range of drivers. Furthermore, it is an important goal to increase the innovation capacity in Sweden, for the benefit of the competitiveness of the Swedish automotive industry.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Cost and efficiency</strong></div> <div>The focus is to solve two of the main issues for powertrain development, namely cost of electrification and efficiency of the complete powertrain. The ambition is to replace fossil fuels as the main energy source for propulsion by developing a device that will give true electric vehicle performance in an affordable PHEV - Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>The iTEM-project will be conducted by CEVT in collaboration with Chalmers. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>Chalmers will develop and evaluate a full-scale inverter based on silicon carbide power transistors. The silicon carbide material has the potential to decrease the heat losses with 50 %, which is a huge benefit both for the cooling system and the electric driving distance.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>CEVT will stand for an innovative gearbox design and integration of gearbox, electric machine, inverter and control system. As the objective is to run a high share of distance in electric mode, the transmission efficiency and the e-drive power density are highly focused.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>“We are very happy that Energimyndigheten supports CEVTs plans for future hybrid drivelines. We believe that hybrid vehicles need to have the feeling more like electric cars. The possibilities with silicon carbide material is truly exciting. This is something we have to learn more about”, says Johan Hellsing, Technical Specialist Electric Propulsion Systems, CEVT.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/E2/Nyheter/Prototypen%20som%20laddar%20bussen%20trådlöst/Yujing_Liu_300x388px.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="Yujing Liu" style="margin:5px;width:200px;height:261px" />New materials that shrink the size of power electronics </strong></div> <div>“At Chalmers we are continuously seeking and developing new materials and advanced technologies for sustainable transportation.”, says Yujing Liu, Professor at the department of Electrical Engineering at Chalmers. Silicon carbide devices provide us new opportunities to shrink the on-board power electronics size so that the electronics can be integrated with mechanical systems. This concept enables the reduction of number of parts and total volume of drivetrains, which are extremely appreciated in hybrid electric vehicles. Close collaboration with industry is strategically important to us. We believe that our forefront research benefits from having impact in realistic applications”, says Yujing Liu, Professor at the department of Electrical Engineering at Chalmers.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="http://www.mynewsdesk.com/se/cevt/pressreleases/energimyndigheten-has-granted-cevt-and-chalmers-with-12-msek-for-the-development-within-propulsion-technology-2520420" target="_blank"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Read the press release from CEVT​</a></div> <div><br /></div> </div>Fri, 01 Jun 2018 08:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/lifescience/news/Pages/Ulf-.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/lifescience/news/Pages/Ulf-.aspxUlf controls his robotic arm with his mind<p><b>​Ulf Karlsson was far out at sea when a fan tore his arm off and he had to instruct his coworkers on how to stop the bleeding. While some said he could never work again, Ulf wanted to strive on. And through a collaboration between Chalmers, Sahlgrenska and Integrum, Ulf now has a robotic arm attached to his skeletal and nervous system, and he is one out of four in the world who can control and feel with his prosthetic hand as with his real hand.</b></p><p>​The neuroprosthetic tehnology is developed by <a href="/en/Staff/Pages/max-jair-ortiz-catalan.aspx">Max Ortiz Catalan</a>, <span style="background-color:initial">an Associate Professor </span><span style="background-color:initial">at the Department of Electrical Engineering at Chalmers.</span></p> <span></span><p></p>Mon, 28 May 2018 15:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/e2/news/Pages/Students-make-electric-car-autonomous.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/e2/news/Pages/Students-make-electric-car-autonomous.aspxStudents make electric car autonomous<p><b>​During the spring, about forty third-year students from various engineering programmes at Chalmers have gathered around a common goal – to make an electric car self-driving!</b></p>​The students have worked with a variety of subprojects ranging from how to collect information from different sensors and how to make decisions about where and at what speed to drive, to the propulsion of the electric car and how it can be wirelessly charged. Other groups have worked to optimise the energy consumption of the car, and to build a virtual test environment to evaluate the car's behaviour in different traffic situations in a simulated environment before driving the car in real life.<p></p> <p><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/E2/Nyheter/Studenter%20gör%20elektrisk%20bil%20självkörande/Teodor-Husmark_170x220.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:170px;height:221px" />“It was great fun to be part of a larger project and to collaborate with so many students from different programmes. This experience really lived up to my expectations. We have had a chance to practice several engineering skills – our group has worked with the motor control system, designed electrical circuits, as well as programming”, says Teodor Husmark, third-year student of the Automation and Mechatronics engineering programme.</p> <p>The electric car, a Renault Twizy, was purchased by the Department of Electrical Engineering in Autumn 2017 for the purpose of being an experimental learning platform for both students and researchers. Research in the fields of computer vision, battery systems, electric drivetrains, charging infrastructure, and control and automation, all have a clear link to autonomous vehicles.</p> <p><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/s2/profilbilder/Knut_Åkesson_web.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="Knut Åkesson, Professor of automation, Department of Electrical Engineering, Chalmers" style="margin:5px" />“Self-driving vehicles is a very hot topic right now and many of our students will work within this field after graduation. It feels good to be able to offer students the opportunity to work with the latest technology in such a current field of research, while at the same time educating engineers that are attractive to the industry&quot;, says Knut Åkesson, project leader and Professor of automation at the Department of Electrical Engineering.</p> <strong>Demonstration of 'Autonomous Twizy'</strong><br />In end of May, the autonomous car went through its first real test before an audience, when the students presented their different subprojects during a demonstration on campus Johanneberg. Would the car stop for the obstacles that came in its way, would it understand when it is going to turn and brake, or would it come up with a route on its own? <p></p> On 26 May, the car was on display for the public at the science centre Universeum. The students answered questions about everything from the technology of autonomous vehicles, the students’ experiences of studying at Chalmers, and what future they predict for self-driving cars. The ‘Autonomous Twizy’ was one of several student projects within automation and control, which was displayed at Universeum this day.<br /><br /><p><a href="/en/education/Pages/default.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Learn more about Chalmers' programmes<br /></a></p> <p><a href="/en/departments/e2/research/systems-and-control/Pages/default.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Learn more about our research in automation and control</a><br /></p> Thu, 24 May 2018 13:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/e2/news/Pages/Prototype-for-wireless-charging-of-buses.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/e2/news/Pages/Prototype-for-wireless-charging-of-buses.aspxPrototype for wireless charging of buses<p><b>Is it possible to charge electric buses through open air, without physically connecting any electrical equipment to the vehicle? A prototype for wireless charging of city buses is constructed by researchers at Chalmers. The first round of tests is promising.</b></p><div>​<img class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="Yujing Liu" src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/E2/Nyheter/Prototypen%20som%20laddar%20bussen%20trådlöst/Yujing_Liu_300x388px.jpg" style="margin:5px;width:200px;height:259px" />In the laboratory at the division of Electric Power Engineering several prototypes for charging electrical vehicles are under construction and testing. <br /><br />In this project, the researchers focus primarily on charging of electric buses operated in cities as they traffic pre-determined routes with specified stops that offer good charging possibilities. Frequent charging allows for substantial reductions in battery size, which lowers the weight and cost of the bus. Alternatively, frequent charging can be used to reduce the depth of discharge, which prolongs the lifetime of the batteries.<br /><br />“The first round of tests on our 50 kW module has been completed in our laboratory and the results are promising so far”, says Yujing Liu, Professor at the department of Electrical Engineering. “The results show a transfer efficiency, from DC to DC, of about 95 percent at the desired power level, across an airgap of 20 centimetres, which is really good.” <br /><br /><strong>Charging the bus from the ground</strong><br />The wireless charging, or inductive power transfer (IPT) as the researchers call it, allows for contactless transfer of power across an air gap that extends from a charging unit in the ground, located at the bus stop, to a similar unit integrated in the vehicle frame of the electric bus. <br /><br />The charging unit in the ground contains a coil which creates a magnetic field. In turn, this magnetic field induces a voltage in a similar coil embedded in the unit placed beneath the vehicle and this induced voltage yields a current that charges the batteries in the electric bus. <br /><br /><span><img class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="Thomas Rylander" src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/E2/Nyheter/Prototypen%20som%20laddar%20bussen%20trådlöst/Thomas_Rylander_300x388px.jpg" style="margin:5px;width:200px;height:259px" /><span style="display:inline-block"></span></span>“Essentially, this part of the system is a conventional transformer but, as opposed to a typical transformer, the primary and secondary coils are separated by a relatively large air gap. The gap yields a rather low magnetic coupling and this is compensated for by adding capacitors to the coils such that we get resonance circuits on both the primary and secondary side”, says Thomas Rylander, Professor at the department of Electrical Engineering.<br /><br />To charge the batteries in a bus would require about 200 kW, which will be made possible by connecting charging modules in parallel. <br /><br />The possibility to charge city buses at bus stops, so called opportunity charging, may reduce the size of the battery in the bus, perhaps by as much as 70 percent. About 30 seconds charging at every other bus stop will be enough to keep the batteries at a sufficient charging level – just about the time it takes for passengers to get on or off the bus.<br /><br />Thus, this charging method is different from the one used for the well-known <a href="https://www.electricitygoteborg.se/en" target="_blank">Electricity bus trafficking route 55 in Gothenburg</a>. Bus 55 is charged at the end stops using physical connectors on the roof.<br /><br /><strong>Higher efficiency and reduced battery size</strong><br />“The two major challenges that may limit the applications of inductive power transfer in electrical vehicles are the transfer efficiency and the size of the equipment”, says Yujing Liu. “However, the progress in fast-switching power electronics and high-frequency electromagnetic materials has led to new opportunities. We want to explore the benefits of using these kinds of new technology and high-quality materials for reducing losses and the size of the equipment.”<br /><br />Using high electric frequency, it is possible to reduce the magnetic energy and leakage field, which is important for applications in public places like city buses.<br /><br /><span><img class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/E2/Nyheter/Prototypen%20som%20laddar%20bussen%20trådlöst/powerelectronics_transformer_750px.jpg" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><span style="display:inline-block"></span></span><br /><br /><span><em>The pictures show the first prototype of power electronics (to the left) and the primary side transformer (to the right) used for inductive power transfer. Illustrations: Felix Mannerhagen<span style="display:inline-block"></span></em></span><br /><br />“This experimental prototype for inductive power transfer is to be considered state-of-the-art today. It will serve as a platform for several future research projects”, says Thomas Rylander. “The work is interdisciplinary, both experimental and theoretical. The seed project funding from the department of Electrical Engineering has initiated an entirely new and very exciting collaboration for us.”<br /><br /><strong>Facts about the project</strong><br />Objective: To develop a prototype for wireless charging of electric vehicles, considered state-of-the-art, which can serve as a platform for future research projects in the field<br />Long-term purpose: To contribute to sustainable, competitive and efficient traffic solutions<br />Participants: Thomas Rylander, Yujing Liu, Tomas McKelvey, Torbjörn Thiringer, Felix Mannerhagen, Daniel Pehrman, Johan Winges</div> <div>This seed project is based on the thesis &quot;Multi-Objective Optimization of Inductive Power Transfer Systems for EV Charging” by Roman Bosshard, 2015.​<br /><br /><em>Text: Yvonne Jonsson</em><br /><em><span><span><span style="display:inline-block"></span></span></span>Photo: Oscar Mattsson</em><br /><br /><strong>For more information, contact</strong><br /><span><a href="/sv/personal/Sidor/yujing-liu.aspx">Yujing Liu</a>, Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering, Chalmers<br /><a href="mailto:%20yujing.liu@chalmers.se">yujing.liu@chalmers.se</a><a href="mailto:%20yujing.liu@chalmers.se"><span style="display:inline-block"></span></a></span><br /><br /><a href="/en/Staff/Pages/thomas-rylander.aspx">Thomas Rylander</a>, Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering, Chalmers<br /><a href="mailto:%20rylander@chalmers.se">rylander@chalmers.se</a><br /><br /></div>Wed, 16 May 2018 08:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/e2/news/Pages/Researchers-prolonging-life-span-of-batteries-in-electric-cars.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/e2/news/Pages/Researchers-prolonging-life-span-of-batteries-in-electric-cars.aspxResearchers prolonging life-span of batteries in electric cars<p><b>​The life-span of lithium-ion batteries is a limiting factor for the electrified cars of today. Researchers from Chalmers now have succeeded in developing models to avoid premature aging of batteries, models which can also provide the car with higher performance in terms of shorter charging time, longer mileage and faster acceleration. The research has been rewarded the Volvo Cars Technology Award.</b></p>​An increasing number of car owners consider replacing their fossil-fueled cars with vehicles that are powered entirely or partly by electricity. However, the batteries used in electric vehicles are still comparatively expensive, and there is still a lack of knowledge concerning how the battery life-span can be kept as long as possible.<br /><br />”If you charge lithium-ion batteries correctly and use them in a smart way, you can avoid premature aging of the batteries,” says Torsten Wik, Professor and research group leader in automatic control at Chalmers. “It may sound simple but there are many factors to consider, and it is important to understand how battery life and function are affected.”<br /><br /><strong>More precise and adaptive calculations</strong><br />One of the difficulties is that it is not possible to measure the condition of the battery, it must be calculated. Also, the factors are constantly changing, depending on the temperature, current and cell voltage, as well as the age of the battery. This means that the algorithms must be adaptive in order to constantly adjust to the changing conditions.<br /><br />“The novelty is that the algorithms we have developed constantly depend on the behaviour of the individual battery cells, instead of having to assess the condition of the battery in advance,” says Torsten Wik. “This makes our calculations much more accurate. The capacity of the battery is thus being used more efficiently, and you can avoid putting a strain on the battery that causes it to age prematurely.”<br /><br />Tests show that the battery thus can deliver an additional 10 percent in peak power and that the actual maximum power can be estimated at an accuracy of 2 percent.<br /><br /><span><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/E2/Nyheter/Forskarna%20förlänger%20livet%20för%20elbilsbatterier/Drive-E-T5-Twin-Engine-Lithium-ion-battery_400px.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:400px;height:222px" /><span style="display:inline-block"></span></span><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><em>Caption: Lithium-ion batteries are central components in electric cars and have major impact on performance and costs for the future development of electrified vehicles.</em><br /><br /><br /><strong>The automotive industry shows great interest</strong><br />Research has been ongoing since 2012 and is financed by the Swedish Energy Agency. Volvo Cars is participating as a partner, and Björn Fridholm, industrial doctoral student, has an active role in the project.<br /><br />“The battery is the most expensive component in an electric car,&quot; says Björn Fridholm. “If we can use the batteries more efficiently, it would be of great economic significance and a strategically important driving force for the continued development of electric vehicles. The cooperation with Chalmers has built up important knowledge, that we at Volvo Cars now are implementing in our products.”<br /><br />Recently, the researchers in the project have been awarded the Volvo Cars Technology Award in the category Research. The project has so far resulted in three patent applications.<br /><br />“It's great that the results of the research have come to use so quickly,” Torsten Wik says. “Now we proceed to refine our calculation models even more. In the next step, we will focus on what is physically happening in the battery cells. This will require a large extent of computational power in the vehicle, but in return it is likely to provide additional potential of cost reductions and improved performance.<br /><br /><span><em>Text: Yvonne Jonsson</em></span><br /><span><em>Photo: Volvo Cars</em></span><br /><br /><strong>Contact</strong><br /><a href="/en/Staff/Pages/torsten-wik.aspx">Torsten Wik</a>, Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering, Chalmers<br /><a href="mailto:%20torsten.wik@chalmers.se">torsten.wik@chalmers.se</a><br /><br />Fri, 04 May 2018 10:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/Transport/news/Pages/First-self-driving-bus-in-operation-at-Chalmers.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/Transport/news/Pages/First-self-driving-bus-in-operation-at-Chalmers.aspxFirst self-driving bus in operation at Chalmers<p><b>​For four weeks, anyone interested can take free rides with a minibus running between Chalmers main entrance and the university library at campus Johanneberg. Gothenburg&#39;s first self-driving bus is now operating at Chalmers University of Technology.</b></p><div>​The four weeks at Chalmers is the first test period in a project led by the research institute Rise. The self-driving bus runs on electricity, is silent and emission-free, qualities which may open for new types of urban development.</div> <div> </div> <div>“I am, of course, very pleased that the first self-driving bus in Gothenburg is being tested here at Chalmers,” says Alf-Erik Almstedt, professor at the Department of Mechanics and Maritime Sciences and strategic project leader of Chalmers part of the project.</div> <div> </div> <div>“We are really looking forward to seeing how the bus is received, and hope that both Chalmers employees, students and the public are keen to try a way of traveling that most people still haven’t experienced.”</div> <div> </div> <div>The aim of the test period is to study technology and user behaviour, in order to assess the potential of self-driving vehicles. The tests will provide a better understanding of the possibilities for future city development, with less use of private cars, more energy-efficient transports and shared vehicles.</div> <div> </div> <div>Having finished the first test period, the project will move across the river to Lindholmen this autumn, for another six months of test driving.</div> <div> </div> <div>Behind the venture lies a partnership of fifteen organizations and companies with interest in mobility and transport. The project is part of the Swedish government’s cooperation program “The Next Generation Travel and Transport” and is partly funded by Vinnova through Drive Sweden.</div> <h4 class="chalmersElement-H4">Your opinion is needed</h4> <div>An important part of the project is to get the public’s expectations and opinions on self-driving buses. Share your views and help the research by <a href="https://sv.surveymonkey.com/r/preS3Chalmers">participating in the survey (Swedish) &gt;&gt; </a></div> <div> </div> <div><strong>FACTS: Take a self-driving bus ride at Chalmers</strong></div> <div>The bus runs weekdays from 8:00 to 16:00 during the period 3 May - 1 June</div> <div>Route: Chalmersplatsen - Johanneberg Science Park - Chalmers Library</div> <div>The ride is free of charge, no ticket required</div> <div> </div> <div><strong>FACTS: About the bus</strong></div> <div>Model: Arma</div> <div>Bus manufacturer: Navya</div> <div>Max speed in Gothenburg: 20-25 km / h</div> <div>Number of passengers: 11 seated, 4 standing, one operator</div> <div>Weight: 2,400 kg</div> <div>Size: 475 cm long, 265 cm high, 211 cm wide</div> <div>Range: about 10 miles or 8 hour’s drive</div> <div>Can go forwards as well as backwards</div> <div>The bus runs on electricity and navigates using the satellite navigation system gps and a radar-like method, lidar, that uses laser pulses instead of microwave pulses</div> <div>The bus model currently operates in Detroit, Lyon, Sion and Las Vegas</div> <div> </div> <div><strong>FACTS: About the project</strong></div> <div>The project S3 – Shared Shuttle Service is part of the government’s co-operative program “The next generation’s travel and transport” and is mainly financed by Vinnova through Drive Sweden. The project is led by the research institute Rise. </div> <div>Partners: Autonomous Mobility, Chalmers University of Technology, Chalmersfastigheter, Ericsson, Förvaltnings AB Framtiden, Göteborgs Stads Parkering AB, Härryda kommun, Karlastaden Utveckling AB, Rise Research Insititutes of Sweden, Sunfleet, City Planning Authority and Urban Transport Administration City of Gothenburg, Volvo Cars, Västtrafik and Älvstranden Utveckling AB. </div> <div> </div>Thu, 03 May 2018 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/mc2/news/Pages/Ida-Klappevik-and-Johan-Bremer-awarded-for-best-masters-theses.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/mc2/news/Pages/Ida-Klappevik-and-Johan-Bremer-awarded-for-best-masters-theses.aspxIda Kläppevik and Johan Bremer awarded for best master&#39;s theses<p><b>​Ida Kläppevik and Johan Bremer have been awarded with the Microwave Road Scholarship for best master&#39;s thesis 2017, in the area of antenna and microwave engineering.</b></p><div><span style="background-color:initial">Ida Kläppevik gets the award of 10 000 SEK and a diploma for her thesis “Analysis, construction and evaluation of radial power divider/combiner”. Johan Bremer is awarded for his thesis “Compensation of thermal effects by dynamic bias in low noise amplifiers”. The winners got their scholarships at the Microwave Road seminar on Space and Satellite on 25 April, handed over to them by Johan Carlert, chairman of Microwave Road.</span><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div>Microwave Road is a national cluster focusing on international technology and market development uniting industry, universities, research institutes and regional and national public authorities.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><div>Read Ida Kläppevik's thesis &gt;&gt;&gt;</div> <div>http://studentarbeten.chalmers.se/publication/252937-analysis-construction-and-evaluation-of-a-radial-power-dividercombiner</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Read Johan Bremer's thesis &gt;&gt;&gt;</div> <div>http://studentarbeten.chalmers.se/publication/252233-compensation-of-thermal-effects-by-dynamic-bias-in-low-noise-amplifiers</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Read more about the scholarship &gt;&gt;&gt;</div> <div>http://www.microwaveroad.se/microwave-road-stipendiet.html</div></div>Fri, 27 Apr 2018 09:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/e2/news/Pages/Automotive-active-safety-rewarded-with-Volvo-scholarship.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/e2/news/Pages/Automotive-active-safety-rewarded-with-Volvo-scholarship.aspxAutomotive active safety rewarded with Volvo scholarship<p><b>​Jonas Sjöberg, Professor of Mechatronics at Chalmers, is the recipient of The Håkan Frisinger Scholarship of SEK 250 000, for his research on electromobility, active safety and autonomous vehicles.</b></p>​In recent years, there has been major progress in the field of transportation research – not least when it comes to autonomous, self-driving, vehicles. The interest in cooperation within the field has increased, both in the automotive industry and from other universities, in the Gothenburg region as well as internationally.<br /><br />&quot;It is great that our research is gaining recognition,&quot; says Jonas Sjöberg. “I have been able to form a research group with young researchers, who have taken on new research challenges in a new and growing field.”<br /><br /><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/E2/Nyheter/Aktiv%20trafiksäkerhet%20gav%20Volvostipendium/Jonas_Sjöberg_300px.jpg" alt="Jonas Sjöberg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" style="margin:5px;width:230px;height:300px" />In the justification for the scholarship, it is emphasized that Jonas Sjöberg successfully has developed the field of electromobility and autonomous driving. Together with his research group, and often in cooperation with other researchers at the Department of Electrical Engineering, he has worked with system aspects, dimensioning, modeling and control of hybrid drive lines. The results have enabled more exact calculations of the &quot;best&quot; design for challenges in electromobility and how to control the energy management in the vehicle, which previously relied on rough estimates.<br /><br />One of the industrial PhD student projects that Jonas has been engaged in, within the Intelligent Vehicle Safety System Program, has resulted in a patent, which subsequently has been applied in newer Volvo cars where a system of emergency braking helps avoiding accidents in left-hand turns. <br /><br />His research in recent years has been focused on issues concerning autonomous driving.<br /><br />&quot;What appeals the most to me within this research area is that we constantly are faced with so multifaceted and complex problems, that for every new progress there is always more to understand,&quot; says Jonas Sjöberg. “It is also important to constantly have the interaction between human beings and technology in focus.”<br /><br /><strong>Prize ceremony and seminar</strong><br />On 29 May, the prize ceremony will be held where Jonas Sjöberg is awarded the 2017 Håkan Frisinger scholarship. In connection with this, he will give a lecture in Swedish entitled ”Historien bakom avancerad forskning: från neuronnät till självkörande bilar”.<br /><br />&quot;I´m honored to receive the scholarship,&quot; he says. “During the lecture I intend to talk about how my research has evolved up to today and how coincidences sometimes can play a role.”<br /><br />Besides Jonas Sjöberg, you also have the opportunity to listen to Bo Wahlberg, Professor in automatic control at KTH, Nikolce Murgovski, Assistant Professor in mechatronics at Chalmers, and Erik Coelingh, technology advisor at Zenuity AB and Adjunct Professor at Chalmers. Se details in the program linked below.<br /><a href="/sv/om-chalmers/kalendarium/Documents/INBJUDAN%20TILL%20HÅKAN%20FRISINGER%202018.pdf" target="_blank"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icpdf.png" alt="" />More information about the seminar and registration (in Swedish)</a><br /><br /><strong>Contact</strong><br /><a href="/en/Staff/Pages/jonas-sjoberg.aspx">Jonas Sjöberg</a>, Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering, Chalmers<br /><a href="mailto:%20jonas.sjoberg@chalmers.se">jonas.sjoberg@chalmers.se</a><br /><br /><br /><strong>The Håkan Frisinger Foundation for Transportation Research</strong><br />Håkan Frisinger was CEO of Volvo between 1983 and 1987, and Chairman of the Board between 1997 and 1999. The purpose of the foundation is to promote scientific research and development in the field of transportation by granting scholarships. Since 2001 the foundation annually awards a scholarship of SEK 250,000, to a researcher at a Swedish university. The scholarship promotes research and development in the field of transportation, and primarily rewards already achieved accomplishments.<br /><a href="http://www.vref.se/hakanfrisingeraward.4.34d8785812fd178ec94800021666.html" target="_blank">Read more about The Håkan Frisinger Scholarship here</a><br /><br />Thu, 26 Apr 2018 10:00:00 +0200