News: Centre CHAIRhttp://www.chalmers.se/sv/nyheterNews related to Chalmers University of TechnologySat, 25 Jun 2022 21:24:59 +0200http://www.chalmers.se/sv/nyheterhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/centres/chair/news/Pages/AI-for-climate-policy-.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/centres/chair/news/Pages/AI-for-climate-policy-.aspxAI for climate policy<p><b>EU’s Horizon Europe programme, with its focus on societal impact, is a fast-track to get your research out to society. Adel Daoud is one of the Chalmers researchers that Chalmers AI Research Centre supports to engage in the programme.​</b></p>​<span style="background-color:initial">What can be seen from above can tell us much about our behaviour. By looking at satellite images from years back and compare with today can show how political decisions and financial policy impacts society in the long run. For <a href="/en/Staff/Pages/daoud.aspx">Adel Daoud</a>, Affiliate Docent, <a href="/en/departments/cse/research/dsai/Pages/default.aspx">Data Science and AI</a> division at the <a href="/en/departments/cse/Pages/default.aspx">Department of Computer Science and Engineering</a>, the impact aspect of his science is important. Working in a mix between social science and technology, makes his research quite unique.<img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Centrum/CHAIR/news/AI%20for%20climate%20policy/Adel-Daoud-3.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:237px;height:237px" /><br /><br /></span><div><br /></div> <div>“Getting engaged in EU-project is both a way for further funding, but also to reach commercialisation and social entrepreneurship and impact for my research”, says Adel Daoud. <span></span></div> <div><br /></div> <div>Chalmers AI Research Centre offers support for AI researchers at Chalmers to find and apply to <a href="https://ec.europa.eu/info/research-and-innovation/funding/funding-opportunities/funding-programmes-and-open-calls/horizon-europe_en">Horizon Europe</a> calls. The EU is investing more than ever in climate mitigation and adaptation and the centre wants to see more Chalmers researchers getting engaged in the programme. </div> <div>AI is essential in many of Horizon Europe’s calls, and Adel Daoud combines it with utilizing the European satellite programme <a href="https://www.copernicus.eu/en">Copernicus</a>. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>“My combination of research fields combined with the so many specific calls within the EU makes it hard to find the perfect matching call. Getting support from CHAIR and their team of experts in the beginning of my EU-journey has really been key for me”, says Adel Daoud.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>The work led to an application to the call that the centre’s experts had detected. Adel Daoud is now engaged in an international consortium, led by a Finnish university.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>“My ambition now is to get experience to later coordinate coming European projects”, says Adel Daoud.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>If the project is granted, Adel Daoud will explore the effect political decisions have had on climate, using AI-algorithms and image recognition on satellite images in Europe and Africa. He will concretise what effect policy has on the balance between industrial development vs the energy transition. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>EU-support funding through Chalmers AI Research Centre did a first round in 2021/2022. It resulted in applications to Horizon Europe for three research teams. The centre will now take the next step in EU-support and include it in new centre activities that will start in the autumn of 2022. ​<br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div>Read more about Adel Daoud's research <a href="/en/centres/chair/news/Pages/Measuring-poverty-through-satellite-images.aspx">here</a>.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Text:</strong> Mats Tiborn<br /></div>Tue, 31 May 2022 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/Chalmers-researchers-join-Young-Academy-of-Sweden.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/Chalmers-researchers-join-Young-Academy-of-Sweden.aspxChalmers researchers join Young Academy of Sweden <p><b>Two researchers at Chalmers University of Technology are amongst the six new members of the Young Academy of Sweden presented today. Jessica Jewell, whose research focuses on the transition to a fossil free energy system, and Adel Daoud, who uses AI to study measures to end poverty in African communities.  </b></p><div><div>The Young Academy of Sweden The Academy was founded in 2011 at the initiative of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. Each member elected for a period of five years. Those who wish to apply should have taken their PhD degree no more than ten years ago. </div></div> <div> </div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">Jessica Jewell</h3> <div> </div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/SEE/Nyheter/Jessica-Jewell-200.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><div>Jessica Jewell is Associate professor in energy transformation at the division of Physical Resource Theory, the Department of Space, Earth and Environment at Chalmers University of Technology:</div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">&quot;Scientists have figured out how to save the climate in mathematical models but can we do it in the real world? My research group investigates this question by examining change and continuity in energy systems. I use energy system models, technological innovation and diffusion theories, and analysis from political science and history. We zoom in on cases where change has been rapid and profound such as the response to the 1970s oil crises and the growth of solar and wind power in recent years to understand what enabled such rapid change and how they can be scaled up and replicated in different countries. By identifying historical precedents of rapid transitions and comparing these to the scale and speed of changes society needs to meet climate targets, we are able to identify the areas where change is most feasible. </span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">I applied to the Young Academy of Sweden because I want to develop Sweden's system for attracting research talent and developing science by identifying the areas where we are already world leaders, as well as those where we can learn from other countries. I am particularly interested in strengthening international mobility and transparency in funding to ensure that Swedish institutions constitute strong growth environments for young researchers&quot;</span><span style="background-color:initial">.  </span></div></div> <div> </div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">Adel Daoud</h3> <div> </div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/SEE/Nyheter/AdelDaoud-200.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><div><span style="background-color:initial">Adel Daoud Associate professor in analytical sociology at Linköping University, and, Affiliated associate professor in data science and AI at Chalmers University of Technology:</span><span style="background-color:initial"> </span><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div>&quot;About 300 million people in Africa live in extreme poverty. Given that living in impoverished communities can trap people in cycles of deprivation (‘poverty traps’), major development actors such as China and the World Bank have deployed a stream of projects to break these cycles (‘poverty targeting’). However, as scholars are held back by a data challenge, research has up until now been unable to answer fundamental questions such as whether poverty traps exist, and to evaluate what extent interventions can release communities from such traps </div> <div><br /></div> <div>I am leading the <a href="https://liu.se/en/research/global-lab-ai">AI and Global Development Lab​</a> to identify to what extent African communities are trapped in poverty and examine how competing development programs can alter these communities’ prospects to free themselves from deprivation. Our Lab has the following objectives: (i) train image recognition algorithms—a form of AI—to identify local poverty from satellite images, 1984-2020; (ii) use these data to analyze how development actors affect African communities; (iii) use mixed methods to develop theories of the varieties of poverty traps; (iv), develop an R package, PovertyMachine, that will produce poverty estimates from new satellite images—ensuring that our innovations will benefit poverty research. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>I want to be a part of the Young Academy of Sweden <span style="background-color:initial">Because the academy offers a unique opportunity to change, improve, and refine Swedish universities and their position globally”</span><span style="background-color:initial">. </span></div></div> <div> </div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">About the Young Academy of Sweden  </h3> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3"> </h3> <div>The Young Academy of Sweden is a multidisciplinary academy, comprising a selection of the best young researchers in Sweden – an independent platform that gives young researchers a strong voice in the research policy debate and is working on raising the profile of research for young people. </div> <div><br /></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">Young academies exist in over 30 countries and Sweden's Young Academy works with the other young academies at Nordic, European and global levels. </span><span style="background-color:initial">. </span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><div><a href="https://www.sverigesungaakademi.se/en-GB/1.html">Read more about the Young Academy of Sweden and its new members</a>. </div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><font color="#1166aa"><b><a href="/en/research/our-scientists/Pages/The-Young-Academy-of-Sweden.aspx">Find all Chalmers researchers who are or have been members of the Young Academy of Sweden</a></b></font></span>.</div></span></div>Tue, 24 May 2022 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/centres/chair/news/Pages/An-intelligent-and-social-drone.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/centres/chair/news/Pages/An-intelligent-and-social-drone.aspxAn intelligent and social drone<p><b>​Have you ever met a polite drone? In the project &quot;AI + Social Drones: Towards Autonomous and Adaptive Social Drones&quot; Associate Professor Mohammad Obaid and colleagues will investigate how flying drones can interact with humans using AI.</b></p>​Drones are becoming more and more useful as tools in areas like transportation and health. <br />In the project <em>AI + Social Drones: Towards Autonomous and Adaptive Social Drones</em>, funded by Chalmers AI Research Centre, CHAIR, the research team will look into social drones and their role in society. Starting this summer, the project will investigate how drones can operate in a human environment in an acceptable way. <br /><br />“If we have an AI entity in our environment, in this case a flying robot, how do we interact with it as humans? We want to teach it to understand us and to pick up our social cues while flying next to us. Also, how should we as humans interact with it and behave?” says Associate Professor <a href="/en/Staff/Pages/mobaid.aspx">Mohammad Obaid</a>, project leader.<br /><br /><strong>What is a social drone?</strong><br />A drone is a flying robot that can be controlled remotely, and when we throw in the word social next to a drone, two things happen. One is that they can exhibit social cues to us. They can tell us how they are behaving and their intentions. Secondly, is to make it learn how to pick up our behavior, our social cues. <br /><br />“The idea is that if we, in this project, learn how to make this work, we will have a better understanding of how to accept and trust them in different application areas and contexts, which will make them more usable”, says Mohammad Obaid.  <br /><br />To make this happen, AI is needed. Data from interaction activities are collected and used to train the robot to develop social cues. An intelligent drone may be able to read from the user’s face if it is welcoming or anxious and then choose a suitable distance to the person.<br /><br />Drones are already used in delivery services and civil services, like healthcare and well-being. <br /><br />“Health is something we are looking in to as well. With AI applied in the drone, we believe that drones could do much good, for instance in emergency situations in remote areas. <br /><br /><strong>Communicating with a robot</strong><br /><div>We are used to see robots in sci-fi where they have faces and can communicate what they think and their intentions, and many scientists get inspired by it. Mohammad Obaid is one of them.</div> <br /><div>“In earlier research we have tested to add eyes to a drone. The eyes let the drone gaze to the direction it intends to go and thereby communicate its intentions”, he says. </div> <br /><div>Many tests are being done with ground robots, which cannot fly. Applying the research on a drone is similar but the ability to fly gives the robot a new dimension.</div> <div><br /></div> “A drone can give you a new perspective from above for example, and it will be much more mobile than ground robots, not getting stuck on obstacles”, says Mohammad Obaid.<br /><br /><strong>A drone companion</strong><br /><div>It may seem tempting to imagine that the social drone will be as common as the smartphone in a near future. But there are many issues to resolve before this becomes reality, Mohammad Obaid thinks.</div> <div><br /></div> <div> “It could well be that people will have a drone companion, but we need to think about ethics first. As with cell phones, we need to know what will happen with society when adding social drones, as with all human interaction with AI systems. I think more important is if the drone can be of use in health and well-being, like if they can be used to help people for instance in remote areas or as lifeguards on the beach”, he says.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><span><strong>Text: </strong>Mats Tiborn<span style="display:inline-block"></span></span><br /></div>Mon, 23 May 2022 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/m2/news/Pages/Mission-make-the-car-autonomous.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/m2/news/Pages/Mission-make-the-car-autonomous.aspxMission: make the car autonomous!<p><b>​“I really like cars! So, this is fun! says 15-year-old Elin, one of the many high school students who got the chance to try out how to make cars autonomous in the workshop &quot;Get started with self-driving vehicles and AI&quot; which took place at Chalmers during this year's edition of the International Science Festival.</b></p>​<span style="background-color:initial">It's Friday morning in May and the Science Festival is in full swing in Gothenburg. In one of the larger classrooms at Chalmers, about 30 ninth graders from Fridaskolan in Kvillebäcken are waiting for a workshop in AI and self-driving vehicles to start. The benches are placed in a U-shape and the students' attention is directed towards the small cones in yellow, blue and white that are already lined up in a kind of track curling up on the space between them.<br /><br /></span><div><strong>Millie Skoglund</strong>, project assistant at the Division of Vehicle Technology and Autonomous Systems, is running today’s workshop along with <strong>Ola Benderius</strong>, associate professor at the division, and <strong>Liv Johansson</strong>, also a project assistant. Millie first came to Chalmers not even a year ago as a “Tekniksprånget” intern straight from high school. And there’s no doubt that she’s already more than comfortable in the topic autonomous vehicles.<br /><br /></div> <div>“There’s a lot of exciting stuff here at Chalmers. But the thing that we enjoy more than anything is self-driving <br />vehicles! declares Millie to the students before kick starting the workshop.<br /></div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">A crash course in autonomous systems</h2> <div>First thing on the agenda: movie time! </div> <div>Scenes from a busy motorway are played on the screen, but from an unknown perspective. The students observe with curiosity. Vehicles - buses, cars and trucks - pass by at high speed. With each vehicle, a number appears. And a little further down on the screen, a diagram with a graph that moves up and down as the vehicles pass. What exactly are we watching? Millie throws the question out to her audience. No one seems willing to take a guess. <br /><br /></div> <div><strong>Let’s make it a cliff hanger</strong>, she states and approaches the three objects that are placed on a table - a camera, a GPS antenna and a lidar. All sensors that self-driving vehicles need to collect data from their surroundings. The camera that can identify which vehicles are nearby, the GPS antenna that can determine the distance to oncoming vehicles and the lidar, arguably the star in the crowd - at least if you ask Millie:<br /><br /></div> <div>“So, this one is the coolest! The lidar. It works like a radar, but it sends out millions of laser beams to be able to make very precise 3D scans of its surroundings,” she explains and goes on to revealing what the film was actually about. <br /><br /></div> <div>“It was a Chalmers truck equipped with sensors like these that drives every day from the harbor of Gothenburg to Borås. The numbers that popped up around the oncoming cars were a value of how certain the truck was in its assessment of what type of vehicle it encountered,” says Millie. <br /><br /></div> <div><strong>The topic brings us to the next</strong> step in the process of developing self-driving vehicles: the AI part. Because it’s not enough to be able to collect data from the car’s surroundings. The autonomous vehicle must be able to understand the information, as well. Which somehow becomes the &quot;cue&quot; for Millie’s colleague Ola Benderius to take over. He’s a researcher focusing on self-driving systems in cars, trucks, and aircrafts.<br /><br /></div> <div>“I develop programs that make it possible for self-driving cars to understand, interpret and make decisions based on the data that the sensors have collected. For example, if a camera on the car can detect white lines on the road, the program can make the car understand where it should drive,” he explains to the students.<br /></div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">Say hello to the Kiwi car</h2> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/M2/Nyheter/kiwi%20200x200.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px 10px" /><br />After the theoretical crash course in autonomous vehicles, it’s become high time for the students to try for themselves what it’s like to work with self-driving vehicles. The star of the show is the so-called Kiwi car. A small 3D-printed model car with black body frames and a red bumper with small glued-on eyes at the front. In the middle of the car, heaves of tangled cords in all the colors of the spectrum. And at the top, a small royal crown. The Kiwi car is part of a learning platform that Ola and his research team have been working on for several years. The purpose? To get young people to learn to program autonomous vehicles already in school.<br /><br /></div> <div><strong>The group is divided into smaller</strong> teams, half of which are stationed in a nearby room. Assignments are distributed. <span style="background-color:initial">In one room, the challenge is to use a program developed for self-driving cars to get the Kiwi car to autonomously get around the track outlined with cones. But to succeed, the teams need to set the car's ability to perceive the colors of the cones correctly – making blue look like blue and white look like white - so that the car knows how to navigate among the cones. Using an iPad, the students start to pull the controls with great enthusiasm to adjust the color perception in the car's camera so that they correspond to reality. <br />An exciting but not entirely simple task, it should turn out.<br /><br /></span></div> <div>At a table in one corner, Sanna, Elin, Noa and Carl-Johan are leaning over the iPad. They pull the controls up and down, trying to find the right levels. <br /><br /></div> <div>“We’re able to find the blue one but not the yellow one,” says Carl-Johan a bit frustrated.</div> <div>“Yes, the yellow ones can be a bit tricky,” says Ola and tries to help the group fine-tune some more with the controls. <br /><br /></div> <div>The group members take turns trying to find the right color coding on the iPad. At the same time, the group - not entirely unexpectedly – start talking about the subject of self-driving cars.<br /><br /><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/M2/Nyheter/Elin%20kiwi%20200x200.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="" style="margin:5px 10px" /><strong style="background-color:initial">“We haven’t talked that much</strong><span style="background-color:initial"> about self-driving cars at school. But I think it’s interesting, says Elin who already has a great interest in cars. After the summer, she will start studying at a technical high school. </span><br /></div> <div>“I really like cars! So, this is fun,” she says, reaching for the iPad to give it another try.<br /><br /></div> <div>Classmate Sanna doesn’t really share Elin's passion for cars and technology, but still finds the workshop somewhat useful. In the autumn, she will go on to studying hairdressing, if everything goes according to plan.<br /><br /></div> <div>“I'm usually not that interested in things like this. But I think it's interesting to see how the systems work. It’s most fascinating to see how cars can drive themselves,” she says and delves into a possible future scenario:<br /><br /></div> <div>“Imagine if you’re a truck driver and the truck is self-driving. Then you can continue driving while being asleep,”<br />Sanna says and makes the whole group laugh.<br /><br /></div> <div>Suddenly all eyes are turned to the cut path on the floor. One of the other groups has made the car work.<br /><br /></div> <div><strong>“This looks great!” </strong>exclaims Ola.</div> <div><br />The small Kiwi car finds its way between the cones at a steady speed, completely by itself. And even though it looks promising, it soon gets into problem as it drives straight into a yellow cone. The group has no choice but to return to the drawing board. Ola tries to explain what went wrong. <br /><br /></div> <div>“Do you see that the image is fuzzy? It’s not completely clear. This means that the car will beware of everything,” he explains.<br /></div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">Can you beat the record?</h2> <div>In the other room, the groups are battling another task. The focus here is not on getting the car to drive by itself. It’s about getting the Kiwi car around the track with the help of hand control with human help. <br /><br /></div> <div>“The previous groups’ record was 18 seconds! Which is really good. Can you beat it?” Millie asks.</div> <div><br /><strong>The teams immediately accept </strong>the challenge and throw themselves over the cars on the floor. Here, too, cones are lined up in a formation that forms a track for the cars. One in each group times with a timer clock while someone else in the group tries to steer the Kiwi car correctly, without hitting any cone. With mixed success. Cones are slightly overturned here and there, and the timer is consequently zeroed. But no one wants to be a quitter. After a few attempts and with a lot of focus - and quite a lot of laughter - some groups manage to get the car around the track in just over a minute.<br /><br /></div> <div>And pretty soon it's time to gather all the groups and finish the workshop.</div> <div>Once gathered in the classroom, Ola demonstrates what an optimal color setting looks like for the Kiwi car to perceive its surroundings in the best way. They try out together using the iPad controls while the camera view of the Kiwi car is projected on a screen. <br /><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/M2/Nyheter/ola%20visar%20200x200.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px 15px" /><br /><strong style="background-color:initial">“So, what seems to be the problem now</strong><strong style="background-color:initial">?” </strong><span style="background-color:initial">The question is directed to the class.</span><br /></div> <div>“The blue one!” the group agrees.</div> <div><div>“Yes exactly! The blue color needs to be adjusted a bit. I can tell that you’re getting the core of the principle, and that’s the most important thing,” says Ola.</div> <div> </div> <div>He continues to show the students pictures of real self-driving trucks and cars that, just like the Kiwi car, have been developed at Chalmers. Soon they will be tested on a nearby track. The students listen attentively, as if they’re really taking in what it means that the systems that they’ve just tested can be used on real roads. </div></div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">&quot;It’s the future&quot;</h2> <div>The workshop seems to have left an impression on the students. Even on those who may not be planning for a career in technology.<br /><br /></div> <div>“I probably won’t work with things like this, but it's very cool. It's the future,” Noa states and leaves the Science Festival this time around.</div> <div><br />At the same time, Ola, Millie and Liv are getting ready to receive the next group of school students.<br /><br /></div> <div><strong>“We believe that it can be difficult </strong>to deal with these technically complex subjects in school. Our intention is to peel off the technically difficult but still give a good insight into how the technology works. It’s important to make these subjects easily accessible, partly to educate the public, but also to attract interest for technology among students in these age groups. And that we managed to show that what the students did is relevant to real vehicles, was really good,” says Ola.<br /><br /></div> <div>“I thought it became clear that the students got curious about how self-driving cars work. And when they got to try it out themselves and drive the Kiwi car, they became very engaged and interested,” Millie concludes.<br /><br /></div> <div>Text: Lovisa Håkansson</div>Thu, 19 May 2022 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/IVA-100-list-2022.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/IVA-100-list-2022.aspxMost projects from Chalmers on IVA’s 100 list 2022 <p><b>The 100-list highlights up-to-date research with business potential from Swedish universities. The theme for this year is technology in the service of humanity. Thirteen projects from Chalmers have been selected. </b></p>​The researchers have contributed with research projects that offer great value and potential for utilisation for society, through avenues such as industrial commercialisation, business development, or other types of impact. ​<div>“It is gratifying that we are so well represented on the 100 list. Chalmers has a strong focus on innovation and entrepreneurship” says Mats Lundqvist, Vice President of Utilisation at Chalmers University of Technology.</div> <div><br /><div><div><strong style="background-color:initial">The selected projects from Chalmers 2022:</strong><br /></div> <div><span style="color:rgb(33, 33, 33);font-family:inherit;font-size:20px;background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><strong style="background-color:initial"></strong><span style="color:rgb(33, 33, 33);font-family:inherit;font-size:20px;background-color:initial">Architecture and Civil Engineering Project: </span></div> <div><span style="color:rgb(33, 33, 33);font-family:inherit;font-size:20px;background-color:initial"></span><strong style="font-family:inherit;background-color:initial">Real time optimization of drinking water treatment</strong></div></div> <div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">The innovation of Kathleen Murphy and fellow colleagues measure the quality and reactivity of freshwater resources in real time, and predict the success of drinking water treatment. Their solution will be used to optimize operational conditions at drinking water treatment plants, reducing the need for chemicals and infrastructure and reducing emissions and waste. The patent pending solution, including the teams unique algorithms, will make drinking water treatment cheaper and more sustainable.</span></div> <div>Researcher: <a href="/en/Staff/Pages/murphyk.aspx">Kathleen Murphy</a></div> <div><a href="/en/departments/ace/news/Pages/Real-time-optimized-drinking-water-treatment-on-IVA100-list.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Real time optimized drinking water treatment</a></div> <div><br /></div> <div><div> ​<span style="background-color:initial;color:rgb(33, 33, 33);font-family:inherit;font-size:20px">Biology and Biological Engineering</span></div> <p class="chalmersElement-P">Project: <strong>Fungi for the production of protein of the future</strong></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial">Alternative protein sources such as fungi (mycoprotein) can lead to 95 percent less carbon dioxide emissions than beef. The vision is that the protein of the future is produced by fungi, which convert bio-based residual streams from industry. The fungi are grown in closed bioreactors with little impact on the external environment. </span> ​</p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial">Researchers: </span><a href="/en/Staff/Pages/nygardy.aspx">Yvonne Nygård </a><span style="background-color:initial">and </span><a href="/en/Staff/Pages/eric-oste.aspx">Eric Öste </a></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><br /></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P">Project: <strong>Stabilizing seafood side-streams allowing full use for food production </strong><br /></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P">The demand for fish is steadily increasing in response to dietary recommendations, population growth and wishes to consume more climate-friendly protein sources. We therefore need to convert more of each landed fish into food, as today mainly the fillet is used, i.e., only 40-50 per cent of the weight. <br /></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial">Researchers: </span><a href="/en/staff/Pages/Ingrid-Undeland.aspx">Ingrid Undeland</a><span style="background-color:initial">, </span><a href="/en/Staff/Pages/haizhou.aspx">Haizhou Wu,​</a><span style="background-color:initial"> </span><a href="/en/staff/Pages/khozaghi.aspx"> Mehdi Abdollahi</a><span style="background-color:initial"> and </span><a href="/en/Staff/Pages/bita-forghani.aspx">Bita Forghani</a></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><a href="/en/departments/bio/news/Pages/Projects-on-sustainable-food-on-IVA’s-100-list.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Projects on sustainable food on IVA’s 100 list</a></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="font-family:inherit;font-size:20px;background-color:initial">Chemistry and Chemical Engineering  </span><br /></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P">Project: <strong>Recycling and remanufacturing of indium based semiconductor materials. </strong></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span>You are probably reading this text looking through a transparent conductive material called indium tin oxide (ITO). It is the backbone of all electronic screen​s (LCD, LED, and touch screens), and some solar cell technologies. During the manufacturing of these devices, 30 - 70% of the material becomes production waste. Almost 75% of indium is used for ITO manufacturing and it is accepted as a critical raw material due to its importance in the electronic industry. It is a minor element of the earth’s crust and is unevenly distributed. It's recycling from industrial waste is challenging and requires several stages. In our technology, indium recovery is simplified instead of complicated processing stages and integrated into the ITO powder production to reproduce ITO material.​</span><strong><br /></strong></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial">Researcher: </span><a href="/en/staff/Pages/Burcak-Ebin.aspx">Burcak Ebin</a></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><br /></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><a href="/en/staff/Pages/Burcak-Ebin.aspx"></a>Project: <strong>High-Quality Graphene and Highly Thermal Conductive Graphene Films Produced in Eco-friendly ways</strong><br /></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><strong></strong><span style="background-color:initial">The heat generated from ubiquitous miniaturized electronic devices needs to be dissipated by materials that are highly thermally conductive, lightweight, flexible, mechanically robust and, most importantly, manufactured in a sustainable way. Our idea includes two interconnected steps: 1) Eco-friendly production of high-quality graphene in a large-scale; and 2) Production of highly thermal-conductive graphene films with low environmental impact and low cost. The graphene films are expected to replace the current metal films and other thermally conductive films produced in the high cost of environment, and therefore contribute to the transition to a green industry.</span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial">Researcher: </span><a href="/en/staff/Pages/ergang.aspx">Ergang Wang</a></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><br /></p> <span></span><p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial">Project: <span style="font-weight:700">Adsorbi - cellulose-based foams for air pollutants capture  </span></span><br /></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial">After finishing her doctoral studies at the department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Kinga Grenda founded the start-up company Adsorbi together with Romain Bordes, researcher at the department. She was recently named one of ten entrepreneurs to keep an eye on by Swedish Incubators and Science Parks.</span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P">Researcher: <span style="background-color:initial">Kinga Grenda  </span><br /></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial"><a href="https://adsorbi.com/" target="_blank"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />More about the research and start-up company Adsorbi </a></span><span style="background-color:initial"><font color="#1166aa"><span style="font-weight:700">(external link)</span></font></span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><br /></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><a href="/en/staff/Pages/ergang.aspx"></a><a href="/en/departments/chem/news/Pages/Chemistry-research-on-IVA-100-list-.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Chemistry research on IVA 100 list | Chalmers​ </a></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><br /></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="font-family:inherit;font-size:20px;background-color:initial">Computer Science and Engineering ​</span><br /></p> <div>Project: <strong>EmbeDL </strong><br /></div> <div>AI has achieved remarkable successes but at a price – neural network models are very large and need a lot of resources to train and deploy, thus leaving a very large energy footprint. Our research is about how to reduce the size of the neural networks, without sacrificing much in accuracy, and making the best use of diverse hardware so that AI can be deployed in an efficient and less energy consuming way to solve a specific problem. <br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div>Project:<strong>Repli5 </strong><br /></div> <div>The research is about creating digital twins and synthetic data. A digital twin is a replica of the real world in silico, which can be used to test and verify systems very efficiently and cheaply instead of tests in the real world which are costly, slow and error prone. Digital twins can be used to generate synthetic data to train AI systems efficiently without the need to collect real world data and annotating them manually which is costly, slow, noisy and error prone. <br /></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">Researcher: </span><a href="/en/staff/Pages/dubhashi.aspx">Devdatt Dubhashi </a></div> <div><br /></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">Project: </span><strong style="background-color:initial">Dpella</strong><br /></div> <div>The world is collecting a massive amount of individuals data with the intention of building a human-centered future based on data insights. The huge challenge is how to achieve these insights that will shape the future, respecting privacy of individuals and complying with GDPR. We solve this by developing a technology for creating privacy-preserving analytics based on the mathematical framework of Differential Privacy – a new gold standard for data privacy. With our patented IP research, we provide a Privacy-as-a-service solution will enable data flows, creating the inter-organization value required to achieve a digital human-centred future.</div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">Researcher: </span><span style="background-color:initial"><a href="/en/staff/Pages/russo.aspx">Alejandro Russo</a></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><a href="/en/staff/Pages/russo.aspx"></a></span><span style="background-color:initial">Project: <strong>ZeroPoint Technologies </strong></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span style="background-color:initial">The dramatic increase of computers' processing power places high demands on efficient memory storage. A few players today have control over processor development by owning and controlling processor architectures. Chalmers with the spin-off company ZeroPoint Technologies develops technologies for computers' internal memory that are faster and less energy-intensive and are developed to fit into an open processor architecture. This provides basic conditions for smart industry. </span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"></span><span></span><span style="background-color:initial">Researcher: </span><span style="background-color:initial"><a href="/en/staff/Pages/per-stenstrom.aspx">Per Stenström​</a></span></div> <div><span style="color:rgb(33, 33, 33);font-family:inherit;font-size:20px;background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="color:rgb(33, 33, 33);font-family:inherit;font-size:20px;background-color:initial">Industrial and Materials Science</span><br /></div> <div> <div>Project: <strong>Design for energy resilience in the everyday</strong><br /></div> <div>Our increasing dependence on electrical and connected products is unsustainable from a resource point of view. It also makes us vulnerable in a future energy system where more renewable sources and climate change increase the probability of power shortages and power outages. To be able to handle disruptions in electricity deliveries, and at the same time live a good and meaningful everyday life, knowledge, new design guidelines for product development and energy-independent alternatives are required.<br /></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">Researcher: </span><a href="/en/Staff/Pages/helena-stromberg.aspx">Helena Strömberg</a><br /></div> <div><a href="/en/departments/ims/news/Pages/Design-for-energyresilience-in-the-everyday.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Design for energy resilience in the everyday</a> </div></div> <div><br /></div> <div><p class="chalmersElement-P" style="font-size:20px">Physics</p> <p class="chalmersElement-P">Project: <strong>Nanofluidic Scattering Microscopy </strong></p> <div> </div> <p class="chalmersElement-P">We have developed the next generation of nanotechnology to study and analyse individual biomolecules and at the same time generate important information about them. We do this with an optical instrument combined with nanofluidic chips and software with machine learning/AI. By offering researchers this new tool, they can answer their questions in a completely new way, thereby accelerating their research in order to make ground-breaking discoveries.<br /></p> <div> </div> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial">Researcher: </span><a href="/en/staff/Pages/Christoph-Langhammer.aspx">Christoph Langhammer </a><br /></p> <div> </div> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><br /></p> <div> </div> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial">P</span><span style="background-color:initial">roject:</span><strong style="background-color:initial">2D semiconductor with perfect edges </strong><br /></p> <div> </div> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial">We at Smena have developed a new game-changing material, which is useful for numerous applications. The starting point of our material is an abundant mineral called molybdenite, whose price is only 5 dollar per kilogram. Using a scalable, patented, and environmentally friendly process, we managed to produce a large number of edges in flakes of natural molybdenite. <br /></span></p> <div> </div> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial">Researcher: </span><span style="background-color:initial"><span></span><a href="/en/Staff/Pages/Timur-Shegai.aspx">Timur Shegai ​</a><br /></span></p> <div> </div> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><a href="/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Two-research-projects-from-Physics-on-IVA-100-List.aspx">Two research projects from Physics on IVA 100 List 2022</a></p> <div> </div> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><br /></p> <div> </div> <p class="chalmersElement-P"></p> <div> </div> <div><a href="/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Two-research-projects-from-Physics-on-IVA-100-List.aspx">​</a><span style="color:rgb(33, 33, 33);font-family:inherit;font-size:20px;background-color:initial">Mathematical Sciences </span></div> <div> </div> <p class="chalmersElement-P">​Project: <strong>PressCise</strong></p> <div> </div> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><strong></strong>​We work with clinical partners to identify problems with today's products, and to test and verify our own inventions. We use mathematical theories to solve real problems and we realize our solutions in genuine smart textile products. </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P">Researchers: <a href="/en/Staff/Pages/torbjorn-lundh.aspx">Torbjörn Lundh</a><span style="background-color:initial">, in collaboration with Josefin Damm and Andreas Nilsson. </span></p> <div> </div> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><a href="https://www.presscise.com/" target="_blank"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />PressCise AB</a></p> <div> </div> <p></p> <div> </div> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><br /></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><br /></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial"><em>I</em></span><span style="background-color:initial"><em>VA's 100 List presents selected research projects believde to have </em></span><span style="background-color:initial"><em>the potientalto be developed into ninnovations, to promote buisness  </em></span><span style="background-color:initial"><em>development or to provide other benefits. The list reflects a diverse range of research </em></span><span style="background-color:initial"><em>projects and researcher experise from Sweden's universities in a given field. </em></span><span style="background-color:initial"><em>​</em></span><br /></p> <em> </em><p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial"><font color="#1166aa"><em> </em></font></span><span style="background-color:initial;color:rgb(0, 0, 0)"><em>The complete list can be found on </em><a href="https://www.iva.se/en/"><em>www.iva.se</em></a></span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P" style="display:inline !important"><span style="background-color:initial;color:rgb(0, 0, 0)"></span> </p> <div><p class="chalmersElement-P" style="display:inline !important"><span style="background-color:initial;color:rgb(0, 0, 0)"><br /></span></p></div> <div><p class="chalmersElement-P" style="display:inline !important"><span style="background-color:initial;color:rgb(0, 0, 0)"><br /></span></p></div> <a href="/en/news/presidents-perspective/Pages/IVAs-100-list-Chalmers-technology-in-the-service-of-humanity.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />The Presidents perspective on Chalmers' contribution to technology in the service of humanity</a><p></p></div> <div><br /></div> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><a href="/en/departments/chem/news/Pages/Chemistry-research-on-IVA-100-list-.aspx"></a></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><a href="/en/departments/bio/news/Pages/Projects-on-sustainable-food-on-IVA’s-100-list.aspx"></a></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><a href="/en/Staff/Pages/eric-oste.aspx"></a></p></div></div> ​</div>Tue, 10 May 2022 16:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/cse/news/Pages/how_can_artificial_intelligence_make_running_safer.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/cse/news/Pages/how_can_artificial_intelligence_make_running_safer.aspxHow can artificial intelligence make running safer?<p><b>​A machine learning model to optimize your performance and get you across the finish line with health intact. That’s what Moa Johansson, Associate Professor at the Computing Science division, is aiming for. Together with two master's students, she is involved in a project at the Department of Computing Science and Engineering.</b></p>​<span style="background-color:initial">This May, many people are looking forward to the return of Göteborgsvarvet, after two years of break due to the corona pandemic. Every year, approximately 40,000 runners struggle along with what the coordinators mean is the world’s biggest half marathon, and many have collapsed in exhaustion on both sides of the finish line.</span><div><br /></div> <div>Most often, they are on their feet after some rest and refill of fluid, but every year, a few people need medical assistance.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Moa Johansson, Associate Professor at the Department of Computing Science and Engineering, is together with the master students with amanuenses’ employments, Johan Lamm and Johan Attefors, collecting insights with the purpose to give athletes prerequisites to challenge themselves in the best possible way during a physical performance and at the same time minimize the risk of overworking to a point where they jeopardize their health. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>&quot;I am very interested in sport, so for me, it’s really fun to see how the techniques my own research is addressing, can contribute within sport&quot;, says Moa.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>The study is performed in cooperation with Göteborgsvarvet, by analyzing data that has been collected for ten years and is accessible in Göteborgsvarvet’s database. In the database, values for end results and the participant's age and gender are registered. In addition, Moa, Johan and Johan have taken data about the weather conditions into account, to be able to see if there is something to learn from the connection between for example high temperatures and the number of people who &quot;hit the wall&quot;.</div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">A virtual AI-coach</h3> <div>As part of the project, they are working on a machine learning model. The purpose is, with its help, to be able to estimate the finishing time of a runner, and anticipate which runners risk overworking themselves, by drawing conclusions from the collected data.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>In the future, Moa is visualizing the model being used in a more advanced product in line with the runner’s watches available on the market today, where more parameters like personal conditions, previous performance, and outdoor temperature can be combined with monitoring of the body’s functions, to help the runner to adjust the pace to what is individually suitable. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>&quot;Kind of like a virtual AI-coach that tells you when it’s time to slow down or increase speed or take a break to drink water one extra time&quot;, says Moa. </div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">So, what are we doing wrong when the race ends with us &quot;running into the wall&quot;?</h3> <div>Often we seem to strain ourselves too much early on. Moa thinks that it partly comes down to a matter of prestige.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>&quot;People want to beat their own personal record, she says. And some people are keeping themselves on the border to what they can handle, even though they are not quite in the shape they were earlier in life.&quot;</div> <div><br /></div> <div>There is a tendency in the middle-aged group to miscalculate their capacity. That is something not equally prominent in the older group and among the elite runners, who tend to run according to a different pattern.</div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">About the project</h2> <div>The project is organized within the Health Engineering Area of Advance and is performed at the Department of Computing Science and Engineering at Chalmers University of Technology and the University of Gothenburg.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>The project is a result of discussions between the GoCoActive cooperation, where Chalmers, University of Gothenburg, RF-SISU, GoCo Health Innovation City, and Göteborgs Friidrottsförbund have been participating actively. <span style="background-color:initial">In</span><span style="background-color:initial"> spring 2022, a scientific paper is being written about the project.</span></div> <div><br /></div> <div>By: Agnes Ekstrand</div> <div><br /></div>Mon, 09 May 2022 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/bio/news/Pages/Reproducibility-investigated-by-Robot-Scientist-Eve.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/bio/news/Pages/Reproducibility-investigated-by-Robot-Scientist-Eve.aspxReproducibility investigated by Robot Scientist Eve<p><b>​Only one third of the results from 74 selected scientific papers in breast cancer cell biology of high scientific interest could be reproduced. This was shown by a study where the researchers combined automated text analysis and the Robot Scientist Eve at Chalmers. ​</b></p><p class="chalmersElement-P">​<span>Eve is an automated system using AI invented by Ross King, Professor of Machine Intelligence at Chalmers and Cambridge University, and Wallenberg Chair in AI at <a href="https://wasp-sweden.org/">WASP</a>. In this study Ross King’s research group used Eve to reproduce the results from 74 selected papers.</span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P">“The cancer literature is enormous, but no one ever does the same thing twice, making reproducibility a huge issue,” Ross King says in a <a href="https://www.cam.ac.uk/research/news/robot-scientist-eve-finds-that-less-than-one-third-of-scientific-results-are-reproducible">press release​</a> from Cambridge University.  </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial">“Given the vast sums of money</span><span style="background-color:initial"> spent o</span><span style="background-color:initial">n cancer research, and the sheer number of people affected by cancer worldwide, it’s an area where we urgently need to improve reproducibility.”</span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial"><strong>Read the full scientific paper in Journal of the Royal Society Interface:</strong> <a href="https://doi.org/10.1098/rsif.2021.0821">Testing the reproducibility and robustness of the cancer biology literature by robot. </a></span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><br /></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span style="background-color:initial"><strong>Read more: </strong></span><br /></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"></p> <ul><li><a href="https://wasp-sweden.org/robot-scientist-eve-illuminates-reproducibility-in-breast-cancer-research/">WASP: Robot Scientist ’Eve’ Illuminates Reproducibility in Breast Cancer Research​</a></li> <li><a href="/en/departments/bio/news/Pages/Chalmers-Robot-Scientist-ready-for-drug-discovery.aspx">Chalmers' Robot Scientist ready for drug discovery</a></li></ul> <p></p> <div> </div> <div>​<br /></div> <div> </div> <div><br /></div> <div> </div>Wed, 27 Apr 2022 09:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/e2/news/Pages/Robots-in-homes-industry-and-healthcare.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/e2/news/Pages/Robots-in-homes-industry-and-healthcare.aspxRobots in the home, industry and healthcare<p><b>​​Can robots adapt their own working methods to solve complex tasks? Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have developed a new form of AI, which, by observing human behavior, can adapt to perform its tasks in a changeable environment. The hope is that robots which can be flexible in this way will be able to work alongside humans to a much greater degree.​</b></p><div>“Robots that work in human environments need to be adaptable to the fact that humans are unique, and that we might all solve the same task in a different way. An important area in robot development, therefore, is to teach robots how to work alongside humans in dynamic environments,” says Maximilian Diehl, Doctoral Student at the Department of Electrical Engineering at Chalmers University of Technology and main researcher behind the project.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>When humans carry out a simple task, such as setting a table, we might approach the challenge in several different ways, depending on the conditions. If a chair unexpectedly stands in the way, we could choose to move it or walk around it. We alternate between using our right and left hands, we take pauses, and perform any number of unplanned actions.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>But robots do not work in the same way. They need precise programming and instructions all the way to the goal. This approach makes them very efficient in environments where they constantly follow the same pattern, such as factory processing lines. But to successfully interact with people in areas such as healthcare or customer facing roles, robots need to develop much more flexible ways of working.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>“In the future we foresee robots accomplish some basic household activities, such as setting and cleaning a table, placing kitchen utensils in the sink, or help organizing groceries,” says Karinne Ramirez-Amaro, Assistant Professor at the Department of Electrical Engineering.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>The Chalmers University researchers wanted to investigate whether it was possible to teach a robot more humanlike ways to approach solving tasks – to develop an ‘explainable AI’ that extracts general instead of specific information during a demonstration, so that it can then plan a flexible and adaptable path towards a long-term goal. Explainable AI (XAI) is a term that refers to a type of artificial intelligence where humans can understand how it arrived at a specific decision or result.</div> <div><br /></div> <div style="font-size:16px"><strong>Teaching a robot to stack objects under changing conditions</strong></div> <div><br /></div> <div>The researchers asked several people to perform the same task – stacking piles of small cubes – twelve times, in a VR environment. Each time the task was performed in a different way, and the movements the humans made were tracked through a set of laser sensors.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>“When we humans have a task, we divide it into a chain of smaller sub-goals along the way, and every action we perform is aimed at fulfilling an intermediate goal. Instead of teaching the robot an exact imitation of human behavior, we focused on identifying what the goals were, looking at all the actions that the people in the study performed,” says Karinne Ramirez-Amaro.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>The researchers' unique method meant the AI focused on extracting the intent of the sub-goals and built libraries consisting of different actions for each one. Then, the AI created a planning tool which could be used by a TIAGo robot – a mobile service robot designed to work in indoor environments. With the help of the tool, the robot was able to automatically generate a plan for a given task of stacking cubes on top of one another, even when the surrounding conditions were changed. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>In short: The robot was given the task of stacking the cubes and then, depending on the circumstances, which changed slightly for each attempt, chose for itself a combination of several possible actions to form a sequence that would lead to completion of the task. The results were extremely successful.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>&quot;With our AI, the robot made plans with a 92% success rate after just a single human demonstration. When the information from all twelve demonstrations was used, the success rate reached up to 100%,&quot; says Maximilian Diehl.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>The work was presented at the robot conference IROS 2021, one of the world’s most prestigious conferences in robotics. In the next phase of the project, the researchers will investigate how robots can communicate to humans and explain what went wrong, and why, if they fail a task.</div> <div><br /></div> <div style="font-size:16px"><strong>Industry and healthcare</strong></div> <div><br /></div> <div>The long-term goal is to use robots in the industry to help technicians with task that could cause long-term health problems, for example tightening bolts/nuts on truck wheels. In healthcare, it could be tasks like bringing and collecting medicine or food. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>“We want to make the job of healthcare professionals easier so that they can focus on tasks which need more attention,” says Karinne-Ramirez Amaro.  </div> <div><br /></div> <div>&quot;It might still take several years until we see genuinely autonomous and multi-purpose robots, mainly because many individual challenges still need to be addressed, like computer vision, control, and safe interaction with humans. However, we believe that our approach will contribute to speeding up the learning process of robots, allowing the robot to connect all of these aspects and apply them in new situations”, says Maximilian Diehl.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>By: Sandra Tavakoli and Karin Wik</div> <div><br /></div> <div><div>The research was carried out in collaboration with with Chris Paxton, a research scientist at NVIDIA. This project was supported by Chalmers AI Research Centre (CHAIR).</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Read more about the research <a href="https://research.chalmers.se/project/9253">https://research.chalmers.se/project/9253</a></div> <div>Watch the film explaining the research <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hEUEpQcrDtw">Automated Generation of Robotic Planning Domains from Observations - YouTube</a></div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>For more information, contact: </strong></div> <div>Maximilian Diehl. <span style="background-color:initial">PhD Student at the Department of Electrical Engineering</span></div> <div>diehlm@chalmers.se</div> <div>+46 31 772 171</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Karinne Ramirez-Amaro, <span style="background-color:initial">Assistant professor at the Department of Electrical Engineering</span></div> <div>karinne@chalmers.se</div> <div>+46 31 772 10 74 </div></div>Thu, 14 Apr 2022 10:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/centres/chair/news/Pages/Access-the-Data-Factory-and-the-Edge-Learning-Lab.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/centres/chair/news/Pages/Access-the-Data-Factory-and-the-Edge-Learning-Lab.aspxAccess the Data Factory and the Edge Learning Lab<p><b>​Chalmers researchers can get free access to AI Sweden’s platforms Data Factory and Edge Learning Lab. Researchers can learn more about this opportunity in a workshop arranged by Chalmers and AI Sweden.</b></p>​The <a href="https://www.ai.se/en/data-factory">Data Factory</a> is a collaboration platform where partners can bring their own challenges as well as participating in others’ projects and experiments in a testbed environment. The <a href="https://www.ai.se/en/data-factory/edge-lab">Edge Learning Lab</a> is a testbed closely connected to the Data Factory where researchers, developers, students, data scientists, and other users can collaborate and explore edge learning. <br />Chalmers and AI Sweden host a workshop April 21st to give Chalmers researchers insight into the possibilities that exists. The workshop is held at AI Sweden at Lindholmen. Assistant professor <a href="/en/Staff/Pages/ahmh.aspx">Ahmed Ali-Eldin Hassan</a>, Computer and Network Systems division, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, will share his experience from the platforms.<br />Read more about the workshop and register <a href="https://en-gb.invajo.com/events/welcome/id/3c878710-9ac5-11ec-abdd-9f413ae42d74">here</a>.<br />Mon, 04 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/e2/news/Pages/The fifth-generation lab opens for AI.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/e2/news/Pages/The%20fifth-generation%20lab%20opens%20for%20AI.aspxThe fifth-generation lab opens for artificial intelligence<p><b>​​Chalmers and Ericsson inaugurate a new laboratory with access to the fifth generation (5G) network that will be an important resource and infrastructure for researchers, students, and start-up companies at Chalmers. By introducing the technology in the current CASE laboratory, Chalmers makes it easy for students and researchers to experiment with 5G solutions. </b></p><div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/E2/Nyheter/Femte%20generationens%20labb%20öppnar%20för%20AI/Erik_Strom_0016,1B.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px 10px;width:129px;height:180px" />&quot;It opens up for research and education in industrial applications where fast data transfer and response times are sometimes as short as 1 millisecond, for example for artificial intelligence (AI) such as autonomous robots, self-driving vehicles and the &quot;Internet of Things&quot;”, says Erik Ström, Professor of Communication Systems at Chalmers. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>Connectivity is a prerequisite for being able to work with artificial intelligence, but today there are very few universities in Sweden and in the world that have access to their own 5G networks that they can experiment with.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>&quot;Commercially, 5G is already here and is available in many countries. However, it can be said that the application of 5G is in its infancy, and we will see a very large development in the coming years. Both with 5G technology as such but also with applications”, says Karl-Johan Killius, Head of Site Gothenburg Ericsson.  </div> <div><br /></div> <div>5G consists of more technical advanced solutions than 4G, but at the same time also provides the conditions to use the technology for so much more. Researchers see 5G as a tool for solving major societal challenges.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/E2/Nyheter/Femte%20generationens%20labb%20öppnar%20för%20AI/Petter_Falkman-1_5x7.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="" style="margin:5px 10px;width:118px;height:166px" /><br /></div> <div>&quot;5G technology primarily enables applications that are resource-efficient and that promote sustainable use and development in society, such as digitization of unsustainable technology, efficiency and improvement of transport systems, health care, food production and systems for generating and distributing electricity. Our collaboration with Ericsson enables our research to be tested and hopefully be useful more quickly”, says Petter Falkman, Professor of Automation at Chalmers. </div> <div><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div>&quot;4G was created to be able to offer a wireless broadband connection e.g., for mobiles or laptops. 5G is created to offer wireless connection to a much wider range of applications which may have completely different requirements. For example, simple sensors in a mine have completely different requirements for availability, response time and capacity, while self-driving cars, trains and industrial robots place very high demands on reliability and response time”, says Magnus Castell, Manager Expericom at Ericsson Gothenburg.</div> <div> </div> <div>To most people, 5G can be considered a new and exciting technology, but the aim of the researchers is now set on 6G.</div> <div><br /></div> <img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/E2/Nyheter/Femte%20generationens%20labb%20öppnar%20för%20AI/Tommy_Svensson_I0A5568[1].jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px 10px;height:172px;width:145px" /><div>&quot;6G will give us significantly more of what 5G offers. In addition, 6G will be an important tool for achieving several of the UN's sustainability goals. What makes all this possible are high transmission speeds, low latency, knowledge of the radio environment, position and orientation, integration of sensor network functionality, network of networks and that the computing power is decentralized in the mobile networks. A key to this is that 6G can guarantee energy-efficient, reliable, robust, and secure communication, says Tommy Svensson, Professor of Communication Systems at Chalmers with a focus on wireless communication.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Written by: Sandra Tavakoli</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>For more information, contact</strong></div> <div><a href="/sv/personal/Sidor/petter-falkman.aspx">Petter Falkman​</a>, <span style="background-color:initial">Professor of Automation at the Department of Electrical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology<br />petter.falkman@chalmers.se</span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><a href="/sv/personal/Sidor/erik-strom.aspx">Erik Ström</a>, </span><span style="background-color:initial">Professor of Communication Systems </span><span style="background-color:initial">at</span><span style="background-color:initial"> </span><span style="background-color:initial">the Department of Electrical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology<br /></span><span style="background-color:initial">erik.strom@chalmers.se​</span></div> <div><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div style="font-size:20px">Facts about 5G</div> <div style="font-size:20px">​<br /></div> <div><ul><li>Machine to machine communication – a large increase in the number of connected gadgets that are able to exchange information with each other, also called ‘Internet of Things’.</li> <li>Considerable growth in data traffic – about 1000 times more than today. 5G can handle a larger amount of data from multiple devices simultaneously.</li> <li>Higher transmission speed – top speeds up to 10 times higher than 4G, about 10 Gbit / second.</li> <li>Less latency, shorter response times – about 1 millisecond compared to 25-35 milliseconds today.</li> <li>Lower energy consumption – the connection via 5G becomes ten times more energy efficient than today's 4G. </li> <li>Higher frequencies – in its first stage, 5G uses the frequency band 3.4-3.8 GHz, and in the future also the millimeter wave band (over 24 GHz). To get good coverage, this requires more advanced solutions using many antennas per base station.</li></ul></div>Fri, 01 Apr 2022 08:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/ict/news/Pages/Call-for-ICT-seed-projects-2022.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/ict/news/Pages/Call-for-ICT-seed-projects-2022.aspxCall for ICT seed projects 2023<p><b> Call for proposals within ICT strategic areas and involving interdisciplinary approaches.​</b></p><h3 class="chalmersElement-H3" style="color:rgb(153, 51, 0)"><br /></h3> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">Important dates:</h3> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div><ul><li><b>NEW! Submission date: </b><span>9 May, at 09.00</span>, 2022</li> <li><b>Notification:</b> mid-June, 2022</li> <li><b>Expected start of the project:</b> January 2023</li></ul></div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">Background</h3> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div><b>The Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Area of Advance</b> (AoA) provides financial support for SEED projects, i.e., projects involving innovative ideas that can be a starting point for further collaborative research and joint funding applications. </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div>We will prioritize research projects that <strong>involve researchers from different research communities</strong> (for example across ICT departments or between ICT and other Areas of Advances) and who have not worked together before (i.e., have no joint projects/publications). </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div>Research projects involving a <strong>gender-balanced team and younger researchers</strong>, e.g., assistant professors, will be prioritized. Additionally, proposals related to <strong>sustainability</strong> and the UN Sustainable Development Goals are encouraged.</div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div><b><em>Note: </em></b><em>Only researchers employed at Chalmers can apply and can be funded. PhD students cannot be supported by this call.  Applicants and co-applicants of research proposals funded in the 2021 and 2022 ICT SEED calls cannot apply. </em></div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div><em><br /></em></div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div><b>The total budget of the call is 1 MSEK.</b> We expect to fund 3-5 projects</div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">Details of the call</h3> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div><ul><li>The project should include at least two researchers from different divisions at Chalmers (preferably two different departments) who should have complementary expertise, and no joint projects/publications.</li> <li>Proposals involving teams with good gender balance and involving assistant professors will be prioritized.</li> <li>The project should contribute to sustainable development. </li> <li>The budget must be between 100 kSEK and 300 kSEK, including indirect costs (OH). The budget is mainly to cover personnel costs for Chalmers employees (but not PhD students). The budget cannot cover costs for equipment or travel costs to conferences/research visits. </li> <li>The project must start in early 2023 and should last 3-6 months. </li></ul></div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">What must the application contain?</h3> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div>The application should be at most 3 pages long, font Times–Roman, size 11. In addition, max 1 page can be used for references. Finally, an additional one-page CV of each one of the applicants must be included (max 4 CVs). Proposals that do not comply with this format will be desk rejected (no review process).</div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div>The proposal should include:</div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div>a)<span style="white-space:pre"> </span>project title </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div>b)<span style="white-space:pre"> </span>name, e-mail, and affiliation (department, division) of the applicants</div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div>c)<span style="white-space:pre"> </span>the research challenges addressed and the objective of the project; interdisciplinary aspects should be highlighted; also the applicant should discuss how the project contributes to sustainable development, preferably in relation to the <a href="https://www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/sustainable-development-goals/" title="link to UN webpage">UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDG)</a>. Try to be specific and list the targets within each Goal that are addressed by your project.</div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div>d)<span style="white-space:pre"> </span>the project description </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div>e)<span style="white-space:pre"> </span>the expected outcome (including dissemination plan) and the plan for further research and funding acquisition</div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div>f)<span style="white-space:pre"> </span>the project participants and the planned efforts</div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div>g)<span style="white-space:pre"> </span>the project budget and activity timeline
</div> <div><div><br /></div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">Evaluation criteria</h3> <div><ul><li>Team composition</li> <li>Interdisciplinarity</li> <li>Novelty</li> <li>Relevance to AoA ICT and Chalmers research strategy as well as to SDG</li> <li>Dissemination plan</li> <li>Potential for further research and joint funding applications</li> <li>Budget and project feasibility​</li></ul></div></div> <div><span style="color:rgb(33, 33, 33);font-family:inherit;font-size:16px;font-weight:600;background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="color:rgb(33, 33, 33);font-family:inherit;font-size:16px;font-weight:600;background-color:initial">Submission</span></div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div>The application should be submitted as <b>one PDF document</b>.<span style="background-color:initial"></span></div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=aoaictseed2023" target="_blank" title="link to submission"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Submit​</a></div> <div><br /></div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span><br /></span></p> <div> </div> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">The proposals will be evaluated by the AoA ICT management group and selected Chalmers researchers.

</span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><b><br /></b></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><b>Questions</b> can be addressed to <a href="mailto:erik.strom@chalmers.se">Erik Ström</a></span></div> <div> </div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">General information about the ICT Area of Advance can be found at <a href="/en/areas-of-advance/ict/Pages/default.aspx">www.chalmers.se/ict ​</a></span><br /></div> <div> </div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div> </div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Areas%20of%20Advance/Information%20and%20Communication%20Technology/About%20us/IKT_logo_600px.jpg" alt="" /><span style="background-color:initial">​​<br /></span></div>Wed, 30 Mar 2022 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/centres/chair/news/Pages/Create-your-own-theme-semester-with-AI-focus.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/centres/chair/news/Pages/Create-your-own-theme-semester-with-AI-focus.aspxCreate your own AI-theme semester<p><b>​ Chalmers AI Research Centre, CHAIR, is now announcing funding of up to SEK 600,000 for researchers from different disciplines who join forces and start a theme semester and research program with focus on AI, so-called AI Theme semesters. p, , {margin:0cm;font-size:12.0pt;font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif;} e {;} {page:WordSection1;} </b></p>​In CHAIR's call AI theme semesters 2022, Chalmers researchers from different disciplines, with AI as a common area of interest, are invited to join forces and invite internationally recognised experts to create and lead thematic programs in AI.<br /><br />“We want to create a wide interest in fundamental AI-issues with perspectives from many different disciplines. Therefore, we hope that the call and the programs will make more people aware of what opportunities there are in AI”, says Kolbjörn Tunström, coordinator at CHAIR.<br /><br />The funding will support collaborative programmes within AI encouraging collaborations between Chalmers researchers and external actors. The programs should be forward looking and may consist of seminars, workshops and open events where external researchers, will have the opportunity to be active at Chalmers for a period. The hope is that the thematic programs will attract a broad collection of researchers from different research fields where AI is the focal point.<br /><br />The deadline for applications is April 15th.<br /><div>Read more at the application site and read about an already granted programme <a href="/en/centres/chair/opportunities/Pages/Call-CHAIR-Theme-Semesters.aspx">here</a>.<br /></div>Wed, 30 Mar 2022 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/Transport/news/Pages/Rapid-transformation-of-the-transport-sector-is-changing-research.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/Transport/news/Pages/Rapid-transformation-of-the-transport-sector-is-changing-research.aspxRapid transformation of the transport sector is changing research<p><b>​The transport sector has undergone revolutionary changes over the past decade and the pace of change continues to increase. This has entailed a transition from traditional vehicle research to completely new research areas that span several disciplines. Sinisa Krajnovic, who is leaving the position as Director of Transport Area of Advance on 31 March after a total of six years, has extensive experience of these changes.</b></p><div><span style="background-color:initial"><strong>What changes have you seen during this period?<br /></strong></span><br /></div> <div><img src="/sv/styrkeomraden/transport/nyheter/PublishingImages/Sinisa_Krajnovic_230x300.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="" style="margin:5px" />“So much has happened in recent years and the major restructuring of the transport system has created a need for compl​etely new research and education in new disciplines”, says Sinisa Krajnovic.<br /><br /></div> <div>“The first major shift is related to new vehicle technologies such as electrification and automation, which have driven development forward at a very fast pace. But also new technology such as AI (Artificial Intelligence). A good example is that today we have electrified trucks. Who would have thought that development would go so fast?”<br /><br /></div> <div>“The second major shift in the transport industry is the development from product to service orientation. It has fundamentally changed the industry. Today, the automotive industry is talking less and less about the manufacture of cars and more and more about the services it offers.”<br /><br /></div> <div>“Our partners in the transport industry say that they have to run faster and faster to keep up with the development. This means that we at Chalmers must run even faster to ensure that we can meet the needs for research, education and competence provisioning, both next year, and in five and ten years.&quot;</div> <div><br /></div> <div>“Simultaneously with the changes in the transport system, a change in the energy system is also underway. This means that boundaries between different research areas are blurred. Transport issues are integrated with both energy issues and urbanisation issues, as well as digitization issues.<br /><br /></div> <div>“Our way of working in areas of advances is a huge advantage that makes it easy for us to quickly adapt to changes in the world around us. We can create new research areas and adapt our education.”<br /><br /></div> <div><strong>What are you most proud of having accomplished?</strong></div> <div><strong><br /></strong></div> <div>“To prepare our researchers for the major societal challenges, we in the Transport Area of Advance have <br />created a way of working that is based on close collaboration between different departments, divisions and research groups. But also with the University of Gothenburg, which complements our competencies, and with authorities in the transport sector. It has been a key to success, and I am very proud that together we have developed an effective organisation for education, research, skills supply, infrastructure issues and utilisation.”</div> <div><br /></div> <div>“We have a very strong network at Chalmers, but we have also created a great deal of trust externally. We have developed clear strategies for our cooperation with the Chalmers strategic partners: Volvo Group, Volvo Cars, CEVT and the Norwegian Transport Authority, Statens vegvesen. Together with the industry, we have built strong infrastructures such as Asta Zero (the world's first full-scale test environment for road safety), Revere (a 400 square meter lab for test vehicles, environmental sensors and simulators) and we are now building SEEL (a national test bed for electromobility).”</div> <div><br /></div> <div>“I am also proud that we have created completely new forms of cooperation. For example, through projects with our researchers as academic experts in industry. The fact that researchers can divide their working time between academia and industry and gain direct insight into the needs of industry is very valuable. So-called capstone projects at bachelor's level that are based on collaboration between industry, Chalmers and foreign universities are other initiatives that we have supported and that aim to equip our students for the future.&quot;</div> <div><br /></div> <div>“Our formation of an EU group to effectively organise efforts around funding from the EU is also worth mentioning.”</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>What have been the greatest challenges?<br /><br /></strong></div> <div>“Internally, developments in society have placed great demands on our researchers to switch from being specialists in an area to increased collaboration across disciplinary boundaries to address common challenges.”<br /><br /></div> <div>“We have needed to create new meeting places and forums that provide opportunities for increased dialogue. We have also created thematic calls in response to the needs of industry, government agencies and research funders.”</div> <div><br /></div> <div>“As development goes faster and faster, we have seen a tendency for transport research to be characterized by short-term projects. The short-term perspective entails a risk that we stress research and development and do not have time to work with fundamental research in the new research areas. New research must have a chance to mature and it is important to work actively for a long-term perspective in the education of engineers and PhDs.”</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>What will be your focus going forward?</strong></div> <div><strong><br /></strong></div> <div>“I have had a lot of fun in my role as Director of Transport Area of Advance during these six years, but I also think it is useful to change perspectives and assignments from time to time.”</div> <div><br /></div> <div>“In addition to my regular position as a professor of Computational Fluid Dynamics, I have already got a few new assignments. Since last autumn, I am Assistant Head of Department at the Department of Mechanics and Maritime Sciences. There, my experience and the network from the assignment as a Director of Transport Area of Advance will be very useful. In collaboration with the industry, I will also continue to work with long-term funding for vehicle research.”</div> <div><br /></div> <div>“Additionally, I will continue to work with gender equality, including in Chalmers Genie initiative (Gender Initiative for Excellence), after the mentoring program for senior female researchers at Chalmers that I have been involved in and initiated”, says Sinisa Krajnovic.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><em>On 1 April 2022, Sinisa Krajnovic is succeeded by Balázs Kulcsár in the position as Director of Transport Area of Advance. </em><br /><br />Text: Linda Wallgren Jirvén</div> <div><br /></div>Wed, 23 Mar 2022 13:00:00 +0100https://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/ict/news/Pages/the-allwise-alvis.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/ict/news/Pages/the-allwise-alvis.aspx​Time to inaugurate all-wise computer resource<p><b>​Alvis is an old Nordic name meaning &quot;all-wise&quot;. An appropriate name, one might think, for a computer resource dedicated to research in artificial intelligence and machine learning. The first phase of Alvis has been used at Chalmers and by Swedish researchers for a year and a half, but now the computer system is fully developed and ready to solve more and larger research tasks.​</b></p><br /><div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Areas%20of%20Advance/Information%20and%20Communication%20Technology/300x454_Alvis_infrastructure_1.png" alt="A computer rack" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" style="margin:10px;width:270px;height:406px" />Alvis is a national computer resource within the <strong><a href="https://www.snic.se/">Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing, SN​IC,</a></strong> and started on a small scale in the autumn of 2020, when the first version began being used by Swedish researchers. Since then, a lot has happened behind the scenes, both in terms of use and expansion, and now it's time for Chalmers to give Swedish research in AI and machine learning access to the full-scale expanded resource. The digital inauguration will take place on <span style="font-weight:normal"><a href="/en/areas-of-advance/ict/calendar/Pages/Alvis-inauguration-phase-2.aspx">February 25, 202</a>2.</span></div> <div><br /></div> <div><b>What can Alvis contribute to, then? </b>The purpose is twofold. On the one hand, one addresses the target group who research and develop methods in machine learning, and on the other hand, the target group who use machine learning to solve research problems in basically any field. Anyone who needs to improve their mathematical calculations and models can take advantage of Alvis' services through SNIC's application system – regardless of the research field.</div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">&quot;Simply put, Alvis works with pattern recognition, according to the same principle that your mobile uses to recognize your face. What you do, is present very large amounts of data to Alvis and let the system work. The task for the machines is to react to patterns - long before a human eye can do so,&quot; says <b>Mikael Öhman</b>, system manager at Chalmers e-commons.</span><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">How can Alvis help Swedish research?</h3> <div><b>Thomas Svedberg</b> is project manager for the construction of Alvis:</div> <div>&quot;I would say that there are two parts to that answer. We have researchers who are already doing machine learning, and they get a powerful resource that helps them analyse large complex problems.</div> <div>But we also have those who are curious about machine learning and who want to know more about how they can work with it within their field. It is perhaps for them that we can make the biggest difference when we now can offer quick access to a system that allows them to learn more and build up their knowledge.&quot;</div> <div><br /></div> <div>The official inauguration of Alvis takes place on February 25. It will be done digitally, and you will find all <a href="/en/areas-of-advance/ict/calendar/Pages/Alvis-inauguration-phase-2.aspx">information about the event here.</a></div> <div><br /></div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">Facts</h3> <div>Alvis, which is part of the national e-infrastructure SNIC, is located at Chalmers. <a href="/en/researchinfrastructure/e-commons/Pages/default.aspx">Chalmers e-commons</a> manages the resource, and applications to use Alvis are handled by the <a href="https://www.snic.se/allocations/snac/">Swedish National Allocations Committee, SNAC</a>. Alvis is financed by the <b><a href="https://kaw.wallenberg.org/">Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation</a></b> with SEK 70 million, and the operation is financed by SNIC. The computer system is supplied by <a href="https://www.lenovo.com/se/sv/" target="_blank">Lenovo​</a>. Within Chalmers e-commons, there is also a group of research engineers with a focus on AI, machine learning and data management. Among other things, they have the task of providing support to Chalmers’ researchers in the use of Alvis.</div> <div> </div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">Voices about Alvis:</h3> <div><b>Lars Nordström</b>, director of SNIC: &quot;Alvis will be a key resource for Swedish AI-based research and is a valuable complement to SNIC's other resources.&quot;</div> <div><br /></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><strong>Sa</strong></span><span style="background-color:initial"><strong>ra Mazur</strong>, Director of Strategic Research, Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation: &quot;</span>A high-performing national computation and storage resource for AI and machine learning is a prerequisite for researchers at Swedish universities to be able to be successful in international competition in the field. It is an area that is developing extremely quickly and which will have a major impact on societal development, therefore it is important that Sweden both has the required infrastructure and researchers who can develop this field of research. It also enables a transfer of knowledge to Swedish industry.&quot;<br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><b>Philipp Schlatter</b>, Professor, Chairman of SNIC's allocation committee Swedish National Allocations Committee, SNAC: &quot;Calculation time for Alvis phase 2 is now available for all Swedish researchers, also for the large projects that we distribute via SNAC. We were all hesitant when GPU-accelerated systems were introduced a couple of years ago, but we as researchers have learned to relate to this development, not least through special libraries for machine learning, such as Tensorflow, which runs super fast on such systems. Therefore, we are especially happy to now have Alvis in SNIC's computer landscape so that we can also cover this increasing need for GPU-based computer time.&quot;</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Scott Tease</strong>, Vice President and General Manager of Lenovo’s High Performance Computing (HPC) and Artificial Intelligence (AI) business: <span style="background-color:initial">“Lenovo </span><span style="background-color:initial">is grateful to be selected by Chalmers University of Technology for the Alvis project.  Alvis will power cutting-edge research across diverse areas from Material Science to Energy, from Health care to Nano and beyond. </span><span style="background-color:initial">Alvis is truly unique, built on the premise of different architectures for different workloads.</span></div> <div>Alvis leverages Lenovo’s NeptuneTM liquid cooling technologies to deliver unparalleled compute efficiency.  Chalmers has chosen to implement multiple, different Lenovo ThinkSystem servers to deliver the right NVIDIA GPU to their users, but in a way that prioritizes energy savings and workload balance, instead of just throwing more underutilized GPUs into the mix. Using our ThinkSystem SD650-N V2 to deliver the power of NVIDIA A100 Tensor Core GPUs with highly efficient direct water cooling, and our ThinkSystem SR670 V2 for NVIDIA A40 and T4 GPUs, combined with a high-speed storage infrastructure,  Chalmers users have over 260,000 processing cores and over 800 TFLOPS of compute power to drive a faster time to answer in their research.”</div> <div><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="/en/areas-of-advance/ict/calendar/Pages/Alvis-inauguration-phase-2.aspx" target="_blank"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" /></a><a href="/en/areas-of-advance/ict/calendar/Pages/Alvis-inauguration-phase-2.aspx">SEE INAUGURATION PROGRAMME​</a></div> <div><br /></div> <div><em>Text: Jenny Palm</em></div> <em> </em><div><em>Photo: Henrik Sandsjö</em></div> <div><em>​<br /></em></div> <div><em><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Areas%20of%20Advance/Information%20and%20Communication%20Technology/750x422_Alvis_infrastructure_3_220210.png" alt="Overview computor" style="margin:5px;width:690px;height:386px" /><br /><br /><br /></em></div> <div><br /></div> <div><br /></div> ​Sun, 13 Feb 2022 00:00:00 +0100https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/bio/news/Pages/New-type-of-machine-learning-accelerates-drug-design.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/bio/news/Pages/New-type-of-machine-learning-accelerates-drug-design.aspxNew type of machine learning accelerates drug design<p><b>​Transformational machine learning (TMA) is a new approach to machine learning (ML). The method is based on human learning – it learns from multiple problems and improves performance while it learns. ​</b></p><p class="chalmersElement-P"><a href="/en/departments/bio/research/systems-biology/king-lab/Pages/default.aspx">​R<span>oss D King </span>​</a><span>is Professor of Machine Intelligence at Chalmers and was recruited by <a href="https://wasp-sweden.org/">WASP</a> in 2019 as a Wallenberg Chair in AI. The method developed by him and his colleagues could accelerate the identification and production of new drugs by improving the machine learning systems which are used to identify them. The results are recently published in PNAS. </span></p> <div><p class="chalmersElement-P"><span></span><span>“A typical ML system has to start from scratch when learning to identify a new type of drug, dealing with a single issue at a time. A typical M​L approach will search for drug molecules of a particular shape, for example. TML instead uses the connection of the drugs to other drug discovery problems. This makes TML a much more powerful approach,” says Ross D King. </span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <div><p class="chalmersElement-P"><strong> </strong></p></div> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><strong> </strong></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><strong> </strong></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><strong> </strong></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><strong>Read the news text from WASP: </strong><a href="https://wasp-sweden.org/a-machine-that-learns-how-to-learn-transformational-approach-to-machine-learning-could-accelerate-search-for-new-disease-treatments/">A Machine that Learns How to Learn – ‘Transformational’ approach to machine learning could accelerate search for new disease treatments</a></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"> </p> <div><p class="chalmersElement-P"><span><strong>Read</strong></span><span><strong> the study in PNAS:</strong> <a href="https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2108013118">Transformational machine learning: Learning how to learn from many related scientific problems </a></span></p></div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div><br /></div> <div> </div> <div> </div></div>Thu, 02 Dec 2021 16:00:00 +0100