News: Centre Recyclinghttp://www.chalmers.se/sv/nyheterNews related to Chalmers University of TechnologyWed, 20 Oct 2021 20:58:06 +0200http://www.chalmers.se/sv/nyheterhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/production/news/Pages/Looking-back-at-2019.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/production/news/Pages/Looking-back-at-2019.aspxHighlights from 2019<p><b>Two new large EU-projects and a strategic partnership with Ikea. Some of the news from 2019, but there is much more to be highlighted. Lars Nyborg, director of Chalmers Production Area of Advance, looks back and comments the past year.</b></p><strong>​</strong><div><span style="background-color:initial">It is with great pleasure I summarize and share some highlights from 2019<em> (see more pictures below)</em>.</span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">Firstly, we are proud to be representing Chalmers by hosting two new EU-projects and a strategic partnership with Ikea:</span><div><h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">Successful year of EU funding</h3> <div>Gothenburg was chosen to be one of the five nodes within the new European network for innovation and education in future manufacturing industries, <b><a href="/en/departments/ims/news/Pages/EIT-Manufacturing.aspx">EIT Manufacturing</a></b>. It will create a powerful innovation environments, advanced education and massive education efforts. EIT provides opportunities to boost education and innovation on top of your on-going national or international research. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>The involvement and success in attracting large grants from e.g. Horizon 2020 is evident, e.g. like <a href="/en/areas-of-advance/production/news/Pages/Manuela-creats-a-pilot-line-for-additive-manufacturing-in-Eurpoe.aspx"><b>Manuela</b> (Additive Manufacturing Using Metal Pilot Line)</a>. <span style="background-color:initial">It</span><span style="background-color:initial"> is the largest on-going project on powder bed fusion in Europe, where Chalmers is entrusted with the project management. The project will lead to a new European test bed for researchers and companies to test product value chain in additive manufacturing, from start to end.</span></div> <div><span style="color:rgb(33, 33, 33);font-family:inherit;font-size:16px;font-weight:600;background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div><span style="color:rgb(33, 33, 33);font-family:inherit;font-size:16px;font-weight:600;background-color:initial">Ikea new strategic partner</span><br /></div> <div>In January, <b><a href="/en/news/Pages/Ikea-becomes-new-strategic-partner-for-Chalmers.aspx"><span>Chalmes and Ikea signed the agreeme</span>nt</a></b> of strategic co-operation agreement. IKEA is member of Wingquist Laboratory and the new Vinnova competence centre Fib:Re will include co-operation with IKEA. As co-operation is developed it is expected that there will a number of additional initiatives where Chalmers and IKEA will find joint interest and Production Area of Advance has included this option in its seed funding scheme for new applications during 2020. </div> <div><br /></div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">Circular Economy in focus</h3> <div>The Production Area of Advance keeps on contributing to Sustainable Production. The implementation of circular economy solutions is an important part of such effort and hence as Production Area of Advance was the organizer of <b><a href="/en/about-chalmers/Chalmers-for-a-sustainable-future/sustainability-day2019/Pages/default.aspx">Chalmers Sustainability Day in 2019​</a></b> it was a natural choice to focus this day on <b><em>Circular Economy</em></b>. The day started with master class lectures covering from external lecture on behaviors in a circular and resource efficient economy to an inspirational and interactive game on sustainability from in the morning and selection of topic-oriented workshops during the afternoon.</div> <div></div> <div><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JPu33U-2vg4" title="link to youtube" target="_blank">See film from the master class on Circular Economy</a></div> <div><br /></div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">Activities in related core research centers</h3> <div>Production Area of Advance puts special emphasis on six core research centres at Chalmers. The Vinnova funded <a href="/en/centres/cam2/Pages/default.aspx">Centre for Additive Manufacture – Metal, <b>CAM</b><sup><b>2</b></sup></a>, hosted the conference <a href="/en/centres/cam2/conferences%20and%20events/conference%20AAMS2019/Pages/default.aspx">Alloys for Additive Manufacturing Symposium 2019</a>​ during in September. </div> <div>The <b><a href="/en/centres/wingquist/Pages/default.aspx">Wingquist Laboratory</a></b> was a core contributor to the <b><a href="/en/areas-of-advance/production/events/Initiative%20seminar%20the%20mind%20of%20the%20machine/Pages/default.aspx">initiative seminar on Digital Twins and Intelligent Processes</a></b> in March, where the scope was also extended across the fields of both production and process engineering with speakers in a truly cross-disciplinary effort. </div> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span>The <span></span></span><a href="/en/centres/mcr/Pages/default.aspx"><span>MCR (</span>Centre for Metal Cutting Research)</a><span>,</span><span> </span><span></span><a href="/en/centres/cpe/Pages/default.aspx"><span>CPE (</span>Centre for Chemical Process Engineering)</a> <span>and </span><span><a href="https://www.lifecyclecenter.se/">Swedish Life Cycle Centre</a></span><span> are three other centres that strongly contribute to our research and innovat</span><span>ion agenda. We also welcome the </span><span><a href="/en/centres/ccr/Pages/default.aspx">Competence Centre for Recycling​</a></span><span>, now being hosted by Production instead of Materials Science. </span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span><br /></span></p> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3"><span>Royal brilliance over Hannover Fair</span></h3> <style> .ExternalClass p.p1 {margin:0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px;font:12.0px 'Helvetica Neue';} </style> <style> .ExternalClass p.p1 {margin:0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px;font:12.0px 'Helvetica Neue';} </style> <div>The <b><a href="/en/areas-of-advance/production/society-industry/laboratories/csilab/Pages/default.aspx">Stena Industry Innovation Laboratory</a></b> is successfully developed further into a hub for industrial digitalization and will have a chance to play an important part in the future digitalization initiatives in Europe. They were much involved in the Hannover Fair, introducing Prince Carl Philip to virtual welding, among other things.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Production Area of Advance interfaces strategically with Area of Advance Material Science in a number of areas: additive manufacturing, bio-based materials and 2D-materials. As can be seen, this has been quite fruitful as all these three topics are now represented by Vinnova excellence centres at Chalmers from 2020! </div> <div> </div> <div>The review above represents just some examples from 2019 and the list can be extended even further. I am looking forward to 2020 with great curiosity and expectations, where we aim to further develop international co-operations. And, don't forget to book the May 4th initiative seminar on “Production in Space”!</div> <div><br /></div> <div>May the fourth be with you!!</div> <div><br /></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><em>Lars Nyborg</em></span><br /></div> <em> </em><div><em>Production AoA, Chalmers</em></div></div> <div><em><br /></em></div> <div><span></span><em><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Centrum/CAM2/710x320-SO-Produktion-30-sep-2019-bara-forskarna.png" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:680px;height:308px" /><br /></em><p><span><em>Some of the researchers involved in Chalmers Production Area of Advance. </em></span></p></div> <div><em><br /></em></div> <div><div><span></span><em><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Areas%20of%20Advance/Production/710x320_EIT-manufacture-interimstyrelse-Johan-S.jpg" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:680px;height:308px;vertical-align:middle" /></em> </div> <div><em></em></div> <p><span><em>The EIT Manufacturing Interim Management Team at the inauguration at the Paris-Saclay Headquarters, Nov 2019. To the far right: Johan Stahre, Director of Innovation, EIT Manufacturing, CLC Gothenburg. Photo: </em><span><em><a href="http://eitmanufacturing.eu/event/inauguration/">EIT Manufacturing web</a></em></span></span></p> <div> </div> <p><span><span><br /></span></span></p> <div> </div> <p><span><span><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Areas%20of%20Advance/Production/680x510-Official-group-photo_Gothenburg_MANUELA-768x576.png" alt="" /><br /></span></span></p> <div> </div> <p><span><em>In December the MANUELA consortium met in Gothenburg and set the plan for its next period. The project is on the right track to meet its objectives and provide the European industry with a comprehensive one-stop-shop for 3D metal printing. Photo: </em><span><em><a href="https://manuela-project.eu/2019/12/12/manuela-enters-its-second-year/">MANUELA web</a></em></span></span></p> <div> </div> <p><span><span><br /></span></span></p> <div> </div> <p><span><span><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Areas%20of%20Advance/Production/710x320_ikea-chalmers-handskakning.jpg" alt="vp bengtsson shakes hand vid Ikea manager" style="margin:5px;width:680px;height:308px" /><br /></span></span></p> <div> </div> <p><span><em>Stefan Bengtsson, Chalmers President and CEO and Jeanette Skjelmose, Vice President of Ikea Range and Supply, confirms the new strategic co-operation. Photo: Carina Schultz</em></span></p> <div> </div> <p><span><span><br /></span></span></p> <div> </div> <p><span></span><em><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Areas%20of%20Advance/Production/710x320_prinsen-och-jonatan-hannover.jpg" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:680px;height:308px" /></em><span><span><br /></span></span></p> <div> </div> <p><em></em></p> <div> </div> <p><span><em>Researcher Jonatan Berglund introducing Prince Carl Philip to virtual welding at the Hannover Fair. Photo: Business Sweden</em></span></p> <p><span><em><br /></em></span></p> <p><em><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Areas%20of%20Advance/Production/680x419_Eva-Cessie-ChalmersSustainabilityDay_2019_191108_103.png" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><br /></em></p> <p><em></em></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><em>The Chalmers Sustainability Day 2019, hosted by Production Area of Advance, started with a speech from Eva Ahlner, Senior Advisor, Swedish Environmental Protection Agency. </em><em>Eva is  representing Sweden </em><em>as the national focal point</em><em> in the implementation of sub-goal 12.1 in Agenda 2030, an open UN global partnership, One Planet Network, for sustainable consumption of production. </em><em>She applied some </em><em>behavioral insights and tools in the design and implementation of policy instruments towards a circular economy.  </em><em> Photo: Marcus Folino</em></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><em><br /></em></p> <div> </div> <p><span><span><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Areas%20of%20Advance/Production/710x320-arni-hallbarhetsdag.jpg" alt="man on stage" style="margin:5px;width:680px;height:308px" /><br /></span></span></p> <div> </div> <p><em style="background-color:initial">The Chalmers Sustainability Day 2019: </em><span><em>Árni Halldórsson, Professor in Supply Chain Management, Department of Technology Management and Economics, spoke about &quot;Service-based value chains for increased circularity&quot;. Photo: Marcus Folino</em></span></p> <p><em style="background-color:initial"></em></p> <p><br /></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Areas%20of%20Advance/Production/680x387_Maria-SL-ChalmersSustainabilityDay_2019_191108_176.png" alt="Woman ion stage" /><br /></span></p> <p><em style="background-color:initial">The Chalmers Sustainability Day 2019: </em><span style="background-color:initial"><em>Maria Ljunggren Söderman</em></span><span style="background-color:initial"><em>, Department of Technology Management and Economics disussed </em></span><span style="background-color:initial"><em>What circular economy measures fit what kind of products so that environmental impacts can be reduced. She also stressed the fact that there are many definitions of circular economy and displayed one of the (at least) 114 explainations she found. Photo: Marcus Folino</em></span></p> <p><span style="background-color:initial"><em><br /></em></span></p> <p><span style="background-color:initial"><em></em></span><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Areas%20of%20Advance/Production/710x320_Bjorn-Melanie-tävling-ChalmersSustainabilityDay_2019_191108_ChalmersSustainabilityDay_2019_191108_044.png" alt="people on a stage" style="background-color:initial;width:680px;height:308px" /> </p> <div> </div> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><em style="background-color:initial">The Chalmers Sustainability Day 2019: </em><span><em>After a full morning with theories, it was time for some hands-on! Björn Johansson</em></span><span><em> and </em></span><span><em>Mélanie Despeisse</em></span><span><em>, from Department of Industrial and Materials Science challenge the audience with a quiz that highlighted the strengths and weaknesses in some of our most fundamental parts of sustainability. Photo: Marcus Folino</em></span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span><em><br /></em></span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span><em><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Areas%20of%20Advance/Production/710x320_purjo-ChalmersSustainabilityDay_2019_191108_104.png" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:680px;height:308px" /><br /></em></span><em>The Chalmers Sustainability Day 2019: </em><em>Lars Nyborg, Director, Production Area of Advance, hands over the traditional </em><span style="background-color:initial"><i>relay baton – a</i></span><em style="background-color:initial"> leek – to next organiser, the Transport Area of Advance and Co-director</em><em style="background-color:initial"> Kajsa Hulthén. Photo: Marcus Folino​</em><span><em><br /></em></span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><em style="background-color:initial"><br /></em></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><span><em><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Areas%20of%20Advance/Production/710x320-E-waste_Martina-Burcak-Britt-Marie.png" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:680px;height:308px" /><br /></em></span><em style="background-color:initial">The Chalmers Sustainability Day​ 2019: </em><em>Professor Britt-Marie Steenari, Dr Burcak Ebin and Martina Petranikova, Assistant Professor, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, was responsible for one of the afternoon sessions &quot;E-waste and recycling of batteries – modern materials demand innovative methods for recycling​&quot;. Photo: Carina Schultz</em><span><em><br /><br /></em></span></p> <p class="chalmersElement-P"><em> </em></p> <p><span><em><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Areas%20of%20Advance/Production/710x320-rikard-digitaltwins-26mars.jpg" alt="man talking on stage" style="margin:5px;width:680px;height:308px" /><br /></em></span></p> <div> </div> <p></p> <div> </div> <p></p> <div> </div> <p><em style="background-color:initial">Professor Rikard Söderberg presenting at the initiative seminar  &quot;The mind of the machine – digital twins and processing intelligence&quot; in March 2019. Professor Söderberg (also Director for Wingquist Laboratory) also hosted the morning session &quot;Digital twins in manufacturing industry&quot;. The day was held in cooperation with Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences (IVA), celebrating 100 years. Photo: Carina Schultz</em><br /></p> <p><em style="background-color:initial"><br /></em></p> <div> </div> <p><em><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Areas%20of%20Advance/Production/710x320_anette-och-kemisnubbe.png" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:680px;height:308px" /><br /></em><em>The afternoon focussed on &quot;</em><em>Simulation as a tool for chemical engineering&quot;</em><em>. Anette Larsson, co-director Production Area of Advance, was moderating this part, here together with one of the keynotes, Andrzej Górak,​ professor with focus on Reactive and Non-reactive Distillation, TU Dortmund. Photo: Carina Schultz</em></p> <p><em></em><em><br /><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Areas%20of%20Advance/Production/750x340-Eduard-och-Hoganas.png" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:680px;height:310px" /><br /></em><em>The Centre for Additive Manufacture, CAM</em><sup><em>2</em></sup><em> hosted the Alloys for Additive Manufacturing Symposium 2019 (AAMS2019) on 18-20 September 2019. It is a serie of Europe-wide Additive Manufacturing workshops and symposiums which began at the Max-Planck Institute in 2016 and covers powder based metal additive manufacturing technologies. Photo: </em><span style="background-color:initial"><em>CAM<sup>2</sup></em></span></p> <p><span style="background-color:initial"><em><sup><br /></sup></em></span></p> <p><span style="background-color:initial"><em><span></span><sup><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Centrum/CAM2/710x320-Group-Raw-Materials_meeting-190821.png" alt="group of people" style="margin:5px;width:680px;height:310px" /><br /></sup></em></span><em>The EIT Raw Materials members met at Chalmers several times during the year. The group Chalmers Rock Processing Research is part in the work: Marcus Johansson (1), </em><span><em>Panagiota Papadopoulou (3), Erik Hulthén (4), </em></span><span><em>Katarina Öquist, Business Development Manager, CLC North, Luleå (5) and Magnus Evertsson (6). </em></span><em>Photo: Carina Schultz</em><span><sup><br /><br /></sup></span></p> <div> </div> <p><br /></p></div></div> ​​​Fri, 31 Jan 2020 00:00:00 +0100https://www.chalmers.se/en/centres/ccr/news/Pages/New-method-for-recycling-titanium-dioxide-from-white-paint.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/centres/ccr/news/Pages/New-method-for-recycling-titanium-dioxide-from-white-paint.aspxNew method for recycling titanium dioxide from white paint<p><b>​Large amounts of titanium dioxide become waste in the paint industry and at recycling stations. Now, research from Chalmers shows a method of utilizing the valuable material.</b></p>​<span style="background-color:initial">Titanium dioxide is one of the more common substances used to produce white paint. But titanium dioxide is an expensive material that is extracted by refraction. In today's chemical processes for paint production, much titanium dioxide is wasted. In collaboration with AkzoNobel and Stena Recycling, <a href="/en/Staff/Pages/kx02kami.aspx">Mikael Karlsson</a>, at Chalmers Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, has developed a method of recovering titanium dioxide through pyrolysis, a type of separation process that occurs through heating.</span><div>The method involves separating organic from inorganic material. Mikael Karlsson has primarily looked at titanium-based white paint because it does not contain as many other types of inorganic material as coloured paints.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>&quot;By my method, we can recycle titanium dioxide of sufficient quality to be used as a matte wall paint, which is one of the biggest uses for white paint,&quot; says Mikael Karlsson.<img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Centrum/Competence%20Centre%20Recycling/Nyheter/Mikael%20Karlsson.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:200px;height:299px" /><br /><br /></div> <div>The PhD student project is linked to AkzoNobel's strategic work to reduce its carbon footprint by recycling white paint in their processes. But much titanium dioxide is also wasted today in colour cans that come from private individuals and companies to recycling centres. Manufacturers may be required to be responsible for recycling for the products they sell, which makes the method interesting even with regard to this type of waste.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>The research has been done with the help of CCR and Mikael Karlsson sees the advantages with having the centre close at hand.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>- I have been helped with different points of view during the course of work. Recycling is so wide that it is good to keep knowledge of others close. I am basically a paint technician and my work here has been very interdisciplinary with access to both industry and different research disciplines, &quot;says Mikael Karlsson.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>One possible next step in process development is to investigate paint that contains more inorganic materials than just titanium dioxide so that these may be separated to create as efficient value chain as possible.</div> <div>On May 4, Mikael Karlsson defends his thesis Recycling of TiO2 pigment from waste paint: process development, surface analysis and characterization.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Text and photo: Mats Tiborn</div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="/sv/institutioner/chem/kalendarium/Sidor/Mikael-Karlsson,-Energi-och-material.aspx">More about the defense​</a><br /></div> Wed, 02 May 2018 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/chem/news/Pages/Solar-cell-recycling-researcher-visits-Chalmers.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/chem/news/Pages/Solar-cell-recycling-researcher-visits-Chalmers.aspxSolar cell recycling researcher visits Chalmers<p><b></b></p>​​For about a year Chalmers is reinforced by <a href="https://ecee.engineering.asu.edu/project/meng-tao/">Professor Meng Tao</a> from Arizona State University in Phoenix. Tao’s visit is funded by the Fulbright programme since he was awarded the prestigious Fulbright Distinguished Chair in Alternative Energy Technology. One of his tasks will be to contribute to the research in <a href="/en/centres/ccr/Pages/default.aspx">Competence Centre Recycling (CCR) </a>with his knowledge in solar cell technology and recycling. He is interested in solar cells from a holistic point of view with the goal set on making the solar cell the prime energy source of the future. <blockquote dir="ltr" style="font-size:14px;margin-right:0px"><div style="font-size:14px"><span style="font-size:14px">- I look holistically at the obstacles that stop solar cells from really reaching a meaningful scale. The roadblocks that I see include lack of raw materials, high energy consumption in the production phase, storage of intermittent energy, and lack of a recycling technology for solar cells. I therefore focus on these areas, says Meng Tao. </span></div></blockquote> <div>If you calculate how many solar cells it takes to produce the amount of energy needed to cover the global demands ther<img class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/KB/Generell/Nyheter/Meng%20Tao%20vid%20solceller_340.jpg" width="340" height="305" alt="" style="height:239px;width:265px;margin:5px" />e is still not enough silver, which is an important metal as an electrode in most solar cells, for this to happen, according to Tao. In addition to making solar cells more efficient he believes in finding a way to replace silver with, for example, aluminium. Furthermore, terawatt-scale production of solar cells would take around half of the world’s electricity production of today, which would not be sustainable. Thirdly, for solar cells to really become a sustainable alternative they have to be recyclable. Meng Tao wants to collaborate with Chalmers to remove these and other obstacles by combining the research on recycling methods for solar cell materials that is being carried out at Chalmers and at his home university. </div> <div><br />He will be positioned at the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, but he is interested in research from all over Chalmers. </div> <blockquote dir="ltr" style="margin-right:0px"><div><span style="font-size:14px">- One of the reasons I came to Chalmers is for the competence in recycling research that can be found in CCR, but I also look forward to getting to know more about the energy research that is going on here and also about the projects around electric vehicles that are conducted at the Swedish Electromobility Centre. Chalmers and my home university have much in common. We have strategic areas that correspond to Chalmers’s Areas of Advance, both by being platforms for different research disciplines but also because our themes overlap significantly. Our universities could gain a lot by collaboration, he says.</span></div></blockquote> <div><a href="/en/Staff/Pages/bms.aspx">Britt-Marie Steenari </a>is director of the competence centre CCR and will work together with Meng Tao much. She thinks it is very positive that he is here:</div> <blockquote dir="ltr" style="margin-right:0px"><div><span style="font-size:14px">- We conduct research on metal recycling from solar cells. This research will benefit from Meng Tao’s experience. The mutual exchange will be that we have been working on different kinds of solar cells, and may therefor conduct comparative studies and system studies for solar power and energy storing and the material streams, she says.</span></div></blockquote> <div>She also sees possibilities for interesting collaborations with Meng Tao’s home university and expanding Chalmers’ network with other interesting researchers in materials recycling and solar cell materials.<br />Meng Tao’s choice to come to Chalmers is, to Britt-Marie Steenari, a very good thing, but not so surprising.</div> <blockquote dir="ltr" style="margin-right:0px"><div><span style="font-size:14px">- Chalmers was early in seeing materials recycling as a necessary research area. Now it has happened. Many research groups are working with recycling research and development of processes, but the Chalmers Industrial Materials Recycling group is still one of the leading ones in that area. We often get invitations from other universities to participate in materials recycling projects. Chalmers not only host the chemical parts of recycling research, but also production technology, systems analysis, economics and organisation, and all that is needed for a well-functioning and sustainable recycling system. You find all this and more at Chalmers, she says. </span></div></blockquote> <div>The strong research group in materials recycling that exists today at Chalmers is based on the initiative and donation from Stena Metall in 2007, which made way for the international impact of today and led to the collaboration with Meng Tao. He will work at Chalmers until the beginning of summer 2018.</div> <div> </div> <div>Text and image: Mats Tiborn<br /></div>Thu, 21 Sep 2017 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/ims/news/Pages/dont-waste-the-trash.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/ims/news/Pages/dont-waste-the-trash.aspxDon't waste the trash<p><b>​Most people can agree that it would be more sustainable to reuse materials in the trash that we throw away to make new products. Even though, it’s not that much of the waste that is being used again. What is it that makes recovering resources from waste so difficult? In the doctoral thesis ”Designing out waste: exploring barriers for material recirculation” by Isabel Ordonez Pizarro we find out what some of the common problems are when it comes to recirculating materials in society and suggestions for how to overcome them.</b></p>​Since the topic is so broad, Isabel has done several studies where she has looked at three different stages that might be needed to recirculate materials in society, and the material flow between these. The stages are production, use of products and disposal of products.<br /><br />– By comparing the results found in all these studies together, we could see that there were six main problems common for all stages. For example lack of reliable information on secondary materials and unclear responsibilities. The results gave us a better understanding of the difficulties for material recirculation in society. To be able to work in waste management, production systems or sustainable consumption, you need to be aware that these are stages inside a larger recirculation system, and that all stages need to move towards the same goal of material recirculation, Isabel says.<br /><br />To be able to reach the goal of material recirculation, Isabel has four suggestions for policy instruments and argues that designers working in the waste management branch would facilitate collaboration with production and waste sorting for users.  <br /><br />Most of the research done in this field have been about how to change the production, for example with ”designing for recycling” or by implementing leasing systems in industry that allows producers to get their products back for remanufacturing and recycling. In Isabel’s research, she chose to see if it is possible to recirculate materials that are discarded today. Starting with waste management instead of production.<br /><br />– Resource recovery from waste has been covered by the waste management branch, but not specifically with the goal of making new products. So, to look at this problem with my professional perspective as an industrial designer is something different and my results are both expected and unexpected. For example, it was expected to see that designing with waste materials is difficult to do. With all the available sustainable design methods I expected more designers to actively include ”End-of-life” considerations when they do product development. I was also surprised to learn how much recyclable or bio-degradable material is being incinerated due to a lack of waste sorting, she says.<br /><br />– In general, I think that people who are interested in circular economy or material recirculation will find my work useful. But I still think that it’s much work left to do. I would like to establish material recirculation hubs in urban areas, where local producers, secondary material providers, waste managers and makers can meet and create new ways of collaborating to enable material recovery. I also find it interesting to develop more efficient, decentralized waste management solutions and I believe that it would help users to sort their waste better, Isabel says.<br /><br />Isabel will be presenting her doctoral thesis ”<a href="http://publications.lib.chalmers.se/publication/246393-designing-out-waste-exploring-barriers-for-material-recirculation">Designing out waste: exploring barriers for material recirculation</a>” on January 27 at 13.00 in Virtual Development Laboratory.<br /><br />After the defence, Isabel would like to apply for new project funding to continue doing research that may help material recirculation. She is also looking forward to finally get some time to do her own design again, with discarded material of course.<br /><br /><span><em>During her doctoral studies, Isabel have collaborated with other PhD students from Borås University, KTH and India. For some of the studies she has worked together with Stena Recycling, Semcon, the housing company Poseidon AB, the office for Sustainable Waste and Water of the City of Gothenburg and the waste management companies Envac and Renova. Her research has received funding from <a href="http://www.mistraurbanfutures.org/en">Mist</a><span></span><span></span><span></span><span>ra Urban Futures</span>, Mistra Closing the Loop and ÅForsk. </em><span style="display:inline-block"></span></span><br /><br /><strong>Related Research Projects</strong><br /><a href="/en/projects/Pages/Bio-waste-to-Energy-Q-Facilitating-collection-of-bio-waste-in.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Bio-waste to Energy – Facilitating collection of bio-waste in apartment buildings</a><br /><a href="/en/projects/Pages/Municipal-Solid-Waste-Handling---A-Design-Perspective-on-Closing-the-Resource-Loops.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />From Waste to Resources. Municipal Solid Waste Handling: A Design Perspective on Closing the Resource Loops</a><br /><br /><strong>Related articles</strong><br /><a href="http://www.mistraurbanfutures.org/en/designing-out-waste"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Designing out waste</a><br /><br /><strong>Contact information</strong><br /><a href="/en/Staff/Pages/isabel-ordonez-pizarro.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Isabel Ordonez Pizarro</a><br /><br /><em>Text: Jenny Netzler</em><br /><em>Image: Roger Langvik</em><a href="http://www.mistraurbanfutures.org/en/designing-out-waste"></a><br />Fri, 13 Jan 2017 16:00:00 +0100https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/ppd/news/Pages/dont-waste-the-trash.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/ppd/news/Pages/dont-waste-the-trash.aspxDon't waste the trash<p><b>​Most people can agree that it would be more sustainable to reuse materials in the trash that we throw away to make new products. Even though, it’s not that much of the waste that is being used again. What is it that makes recovering resources from waste so difficult? In the doctoral thesis ”Designing out waste: exploring barriers for material recirculation” by Isabel Ordonez Pizarro we find out what some of the common problems are when it comes to recirculating materials in society and suggestions for how to overcome them.</b></p>​Since the topic is so broad, Isabel has done several studies where she has looked at three different stages that might be needed to recirculate materials in society, and the material flow between these. The stages are production, use of products and disposal of products.<br /><br />– By comparing the results found in all these studies together, we could see that there were six main problems common for all stages. For example lack of reliable information on secondary materials and unclear responsibilities. The results gave us a better understanding of the difficulties for material recirculation in society. To be able to work in waste management, production systems or sustainable consumption, you need to be aware that these are stages inside a larger recirculation system, and that all stages need to move towards the same goal of material recirculation, Isabel says.<br /><br />To be able to reach the goal of material recirculation, Isabel has four suggestions for policy instruments and argues that designers working in the waste management branch would facilitate collaboration with production and waste sorting for users.  <br /><br />Most of the research done in this field have been about how to change the production, for example with ”designing for recycling” or by implementing leasing systems in industry that allows producers to get their products back for remanufacturing and recycling. In Isabel’s research, she chose to see if it is possible to recirculate materials that are discarded today. Starting with waste management instead of production.<br /><br />– Resource recovery from waste has been covered by the waste management branch, but not specifically with the goal of making new products. So, to look at this problem with my professional perspective as an industrial designer is something different and my results are both expected and unexpected. For example, it was expected to see that designing with waste materials is difficult to do. With all the available sustainable design methods I expected more designers to actively include ”End-of-life” considerations when they do product development. I was also surprised to learn how much recyclable or bio-degradable material is being incinerated due to a lack of waste sorting, she says.<br /><br />– In general, I think that people who are interested in circular economy or material recirculation will find my work useful. But I still think that it’s much work left to do. I would like to establish material recirculation hubs in urban areas, where local producers, secondary material providers, waste managers and makers can meet and create new ways of collaborating to enable material recovery. I also find it interesting to develop more efficient, decentralized waste management solutions and I believe that it would help users to sort their waste better, Isabel says.<br /><br />Isabel will be presenting her doctoral thesis ”<a href="http://publications.lib.chalmers.se/publication/246393-designing-out-waste-exploring-barriers-for-material-recirculation">Designing out waste: exploring barriers for material recirculation</a>” on January 27 at 13.00 in Virtual Development Laboratory.<br /><br />After the defence, Isabel would like to apply for new project funding to continue doing research that may help material recirculation. She is also looking forward to finally get some time to do her own design again, with discarded material of course.<br /><br /><span><em>During her doctoral studies, Isabel have collaborated with other PhD students from Borås University, KTH and India. For some of the studies she has worked together with Stena Recycling, Semcon, the housing company Poseidon AB, the office for Sustainable Waste and Water of the City of Gothenburg and the waste management companies Envac and Renova. Her research has received funding from <a href="http://www.mistraurbanfutures.org/en">Mist</a><span></span><span></span><span>ra Urban Futures</span>, Mistra Closing the Loop and ÅForsk. </em><span style="display:inline-block"></span></span><br /><br /><strong>Related Research Projects</strong><br /><a href="/en/projects/Pages/Bio-waste-to-Energy-Q-Facilitating-collection-of-bio-waste-in.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Bio-waste to Energy – Facilitating collection of bio-waste in apartment buildings</a><br /><a href="/en/projects/Pages/Municipal-Solid-Waste-Handling---A-Design-Perspective-on-Closing-the-Resource-Loops.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />From Waste to Resources. Municipal Solid Waste Handling: A Design Perspective on Closing the Resource Loops</a><br /><br /><strong>Related articles</strong><br /><a href="http://www.mistraurbanfutures.org/en/designing-out-waste"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Designing out waste</a><br /><br /><strong>Contact information</strong><br /><a href="/en/Staff/Pages/isabel-ordonez-pizarro.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Isabel Ordonez Pizarro</a><br /><br /><em>Text: Jenny Netzler</em><br /><em>Image: Roger Langvik</em><a href="http://www.mistraurbanfutures.org/en/designing-out-waste"></a><br />Fri, 13 Jan 2017 16:00:00 +0100https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/chem/news/Pages/Sustainable-fast-fashion--is-it-possible.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/chem/news/Pages/Sustainable-fast-fashion--is-it-possible.aspxSustainable fast fashion- is it possible?<p><b>​The clothes we wear have become one of our great environmental challenges. The fashion is changing fast and clothes have become so cheap that many of the garments we buy are used just one or a few times. Low quality is no problem since they were only meant to be used a couple of times. The business model that this is built upon is called Fast Fashion and makes the latest fashion available for more people, but the consequences are that the clothing industry now has become one of the most pollutant industries. The demands from the consumers on low prices are at the same time making the people that are making the clothes earn less and less, often under two dollars a day and often is child labor occurring in the factories.</b></p><p>​Recently <img class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/KB/Generell/Nyheter/bahareh%20stående%20ny.jpg" alt="" style="height:169px;width:130px;margin:0px" /><a href="/en/Staff/Pages/bahareh-zamani.aspx">Bahareh Zamani</a>, at the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering at Chalmers, defended her PhD-thesis named <a href="http://publications.lib.chalmers.se/publication/236913-the-challenges-of-fast-fashion-environmental-and-social-lca-of-swedish-clothing-consumption">The challenges of Fast fashion- Environmental and social LCA of Swedish clothing consumption made</a> in cooperation with the research programme <a href="http://mistrafuturefashion.com/">Mistra Future Fashion</a>. In it she makes a Life Cycle Assessment on the Swedish fast fashion industry and also on alternatives within the circular economy scheme.​<br />    </p> <blockquote dir="ltr" style="font-size:14px;margin-right:0px"><p style="font-size:14px"><span style="font-size:14px">- Fast fashion as a business model is linear. The material is extracted, the garment is produced, used and thrown away. It is obvious that this is not a sustainable business model. The raw material is a resource problem. To produce polyester oil is needed and great amounts of water is used to produce cotton, often in regions where water is a major issue, she says.</span></p></blockquote> <p>The carbon footprint from the Swedish fashion consumption is approximately 0.25 tonnes CO2-equivalents per capita and year. This figure can be compared with the average carbon footprint for a Swedish person, which is around 10 tonnes of CO2-equivalents per year. </p> <blockquote dir="ltr" style="font-size:14px;margin-right:0px"><p style="font-size:14px"><span style="font-size:14px">- Although the share from fashion to the total carbon footprint is only 2.5% today, the climate impact from textile consumption needs to be reduced considerably in a sustainable future, she says. </span></p></blockquote> <p>She has assessed the environmental impact along the life cycle of five common Swedish garments; jacket, dress, t-shirt, jeans and hospital robes and has focused on how much carbon dioxide and how much water each garment is using during its life cycle. The jacket and the dress were the garments that turned out to produce the most CO2. Both produce around 16kg per unit while the t-shirt produces a little more than 2kg CO2 per unit. Here one have to consider that a t-shirt isn’t used quite as much as jeans or jackets. It therefore evens out in the long run. The dress in the study stands out as a garment that contributes to high carbon emissions since it is 100procent polyester.</p> <p><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/KB/Generell/Nyheter/diagram%20bahareh720.jpg" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><br /><strong>The diagram compares carbon footprint and water use in different kinds of production situations and consumption.</strong><br /><br />Bahareh Zamani <span>does not believe that changing the consumption pattern is an easily reachable alternative.</span></p> <div dir="rtl"><div dir="ltr"><p style="text-align:left">Keeping up with the latest trends by buying a low-priced garment is attractive to consumers, she thinks. Instead she has investigated other alternatives within the circular economy scheme to minimize the waste by using them as an alternative for raw material.</p></div></div> <blockquote dir="ltr" style="font-size:14px;margin-right:0px"><p style="font-size:14px"><span style="font-size:14px">- Our purpose is not to criticize fast fashion, but rather to help the fast fashion industry. I don’t want to lecture and ban the rapidly changing fashion. I want to show that there are circular alternatives that are more sustainable than the present linear business model, she says. </span></p></blockquote> <p>The first alternative she has been studying is how an increased textile recycling could reduce the environmental impacts. The life cycle assessment showed that an optimized recycling system could reduce the CO<sub>2</sub>- emissions and consequently global warming potential with 10 tons per ton textile that is produced. </p> <blockquote dir="ltr" style="font-size:14px;margin-right:0px"><p style="font-size:14px"><span style="font-size:14px">- If we replace newly produced cotton to recycled viscose then we could save lots of water and lots of CO<sub>2</sub>. Each single recycling system doesn’t do very much, but a combination of different alternatives can make a great change and take us towards a more circular economy, and reduce CO<sub>2</sub> emission and water use, says Bahareh Zamani.</span></p></blockquote> <p>Another alternative that she has been looking into is what effect on the resource use it would have if more would start using clothing libraries. In this case it was important to compare different types of business models to see which one is impacting the environment the least when it comes to how the garment reaches the consumer. It proved to be the online clothing libraries that has the least impact on the environment since, at least in Sweden, it is estimated that the consumer will walk to the closest parcel distributer instead of taking the car or the bus to a clothing library in a town.  </p> <p> </p> <p>If we imagine that Sweden would start recycling clothes instead of buying clothes from new materials and at the same time start using clothing libraries much more, then we could reduce our resource consumption with around 50 percent. If the clothing factories would only use renewable energy then the potential to increase global warming would be reduced with almost 100 percent. <br /></p> <blockquote dir="ltr" style="font-size:14px;margin-right:0px"><p style="font-size:14px"><span style="font-size:14px">- Many of the companies that we have been in contact with are interested and want to learn more about the different alternatives to be able to reduce their impact on the environment. But this cannot happen from only one side. Consumers must be encouraged to use their clothes more before throwing them in the dust bin and not buy as much new as they do today. Also smaller companies that want to produce clothes from recycled material should be encouraged and supported, says Bahareh Zamani.</span></p></blockquote> <p>She now hopes that her research may help politicians to have better knowledge when they are making decisions, that the industry gets better understanding of the potential that lies in recycling and circular economy and also that the consumers understand the impact of their purchasing habits.</p> <p><br />Bahareh herself is very interested in fashion and is aware of trends when she buys clothes, but she does her best to mainly buy garments that will last a long time, both so they don’t wear out fast but also so they don’t go out of fashion too fast. </p> <blockquote dir="ltr" style="font-size:14px;margin-right:0px"><p style="font-size:14px"><span style="font-size:14px">-</span><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="font-size:14px;white-space:pre"><span style="font-size:14px"> </span></span><span style="font-size:14px">But it is unavoidable to buy fast fashion now and then. That is why it is so important to help them implement more sustainable strategies, she says.</span></p></blockquote> <div><span>More about <a href="/en/departments/chem/news/Pages/Life-cycle-analysis-of-the-fast-fashion-business-model.aspx">Life cycle analysis of the fast fashion business model in Sweden</a></span></div> <div><span></span> </div> <div><span>Text: Mats Tiborn</span></div>Thu, 07 Jul 2016 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/chem/news/Pages/Life-cycle-analysis-of-the-fast-fashion-business-model.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/chem/news/Pages/Life-cycle-analysis-of-the-fast-fashion-business-model.aspxLife cycle analysis of the fast fashion business model in Sweden <p><b>​Today’s fashion is changing fast, which means more textile needs to be produced to satisfy the consumers. Or does it? </b></p>​PhD-Student Bahareh Zamani introduces her thesis about life cycle assessment of the fast fashion industry in Sweden and some of the alternatives.<br /><br />Link to<a href="http://publications.lib.chalmers.se/publication/236913-the-challenges-of-fast-fashion-environmental-and-social-lca-of-swedish-clothing-consumption"> The challenges of Fast fashion- Environmental and Social LCA of Swedish clothing consumption</a> in CPL.Wed, 22 Jun 2016 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/centres/ccr/news/Pages/Interviews-from-the-Circular-Material-Conference-2016-.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/centres/ccr/news/Pages/Interviews-from-the-Circular-Material-Conference-2016-.aspxInterviews from the Circular Material Conference 2016<p><b></b></p>​The video shows a short summary of the Circular Materials Conference 2016 at Chalmers University of Technology with interviews with some of the speakers. Circular Materials Conference is a completely cross sector international conference with representation from the basic, chemical and recycling industries, manufacturers, retailers and resource recovery experts and the academic world. It is organized by Nordic Publishing in cooperation with Competence Center Recycling at Chalmers University of Technology in conjunction with major organisations from the basic, chemical and recycling industries.Fri, 17 Jun 2016 00:00:00 +0200