News: KoMhttp://www.chalmers.se/sv/nyheterNews related to Chalmers University of TechnologyFri, 16 Feb 2018 14:16:27 +0100http://www.chalmers.se/sv/nyheterhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/cse/news/Pages/cybersecurity.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/cse/news/Pages/cybersecurity.aspxBuilding a solid ground for cybersecurity<p><b>Substantial tools and methods to counter the most common vulnerabilities on the web. Efforts to develop a secure internet of things for industrial use. Two new, extensive cybersecurity projects are about to start at the Department of Computer Science and Engineering.</b></p><div>Cybersecurity research at Chalmers has been successful for a long time, and now two framework grants from SSF will further strengthen the area. Two applications, WebSec and Octopi, received funding in last year's major call for cybersecurity. WebSec will be conducted largely within the division for Information Security, while Octopi has extensive collaboration with the division for Functional Programming. Both projects aim at introducing the security aspect early in development, rather than searching for, and attempting to correct errors when the systems are already taken in production. <br /></div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">Trying to prevent as much as possible </h3> <div><div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/DoIT/News/Andrei-Sabelfeld-small.gif" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="Photo of Andrei Sabelfeld" style="margin:5px;width:351px;height:329px" />&quot;The goal of security research is to ensure that security is not getting in the way of other development, that there are tools and automated methods that make it hard to make mistakes&quot; says Andrei Sabelfeld, Professor in the Information Security division and project leader for the new SSF-funded project WebSec. </div> <div> </div> <div>One of the most serious threats to web security is cross-site scripting, which means that the attacker is able to inject malicious code in the victim's web browser. Companies pay big money every year to detect and block security holes in the systems they use. <br /><br /></div> <div>&quot;Web systems are heterogeneous, they are implemented in different programming languages ​​and designed at different levels, so when you connect them, there will be holes. In a typical cross-site scripting attack, the attacker injects code instead of data. With new programming languages ​​and security enhancing mechanisms, such attacks can be prevented. In the project, we will develop new concepts for analyzing web applications for detection, mitigation, and prevention of cross-site scripting attacks&quot;, says Andrei Sabelfeld. </div> <div> </div> <div>For JavaScript, the most common programming language on the web, the project will deliver a platform for analysis that will aid programmers in producing code that is already protected when it goes in to production. <br /><br /></div> <div>&quot;We will also work with system-wide security. We return to the problem that different components are designed in different programming languages, and often we succeed in securing one of the components, perhaps the browser or database, but when they're connected, new errors occur that we didn't think of&quot;, says Andrei Sabelfeld. <br /><br />Here, the researchers will build mechanisms to track the information throughout the system, and ensure that no information is destroyed or leaked. </div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">Internet of things moving towards the industry </h3> <div><div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/DoIT/Profile%20pictures/ST/Alejandro-Russo.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="Photo of Alejandro Russo" style="margin:5px" />&quot;The Internet of Things refers to a wide variety of connected devices - big things like cars, smaller things as a robot vacuum cleaner, your wrist watch, or anything that has some computational power and is connected to the internet. The idea is that all these devices should be interconnected to simplify and improve your life, but this trend brings major problems when it comes to security&quot;, says Alejandro Russo, professor in the division for Information Security, and project leader for Octopi.</div> <br />Industry is showing increased interest in harnessing the benefits of the internet of things, for example user data sampling and data from sensor measurements can be used to improve the next generation of products. But the overall security level is too low, and an unsafe internet of things is open for attack. There are frightening examples of how smart refrigerators have been hacked to access password data, and connected cars have been taken over and remotely controlled.</div> <br />In most programming languages used to program devices for the internet of things today, security is not a factor. Octopi will make the development of embedded systems comfortable while help placing security at a central point in the deveoper's mind.<br />&quot;The project is unique in the way it will apply the advantages of programming in very high level languages; correctness, security, reasoning about software, for developing software for the internet of things. But this vision requires solutions to some tough problems in order to become a reality&quot;, says Alejandro Russo. <br /></div> <br /> <h4 class="chalmersElement-H4">Project information</h4> <div><strong>WebSec, Säkerhetsdrivna webbsystem </strong><br />Project leader: <a href="/en/Staff/Pages/andrei.aspx">Andrei Sabelfeld</a>, Chalmers University of Technology. <br />Project members: <a href="/en/Staff/Pages/russo.aspx">Alejandro Russo</a> och <a href="/en/Staff/Pages/dave.aspx">David Sands</a>, Chalmers University of Technology, and <a href="http://www.philipp.ruemmer.org/">Philipp Rümmer</a>, Uppsala University. <br />The project is funded by <a href="https://strategiska.se/en/">Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research</a> with 30 million SEK. <br /><br /><strong>Octopi, säker programmering för sakernas internet</strong><br /> Project leader: <span><a href="/sv/personal/Sidor/russo.aspx">Alejandro Russo</a>, Chalmers University of Technology. </span></div> Project members: <a href="/en/Staff/Pages/mary-sheeran.aspx">Mary Sheeran</a>, <a href="/en/Staff/Pages/rjmh.aspx">John Hughes</a>, <a href="/en/Staff/Pages/koen.aspx">Koen Lindström Claessen</a> and <a href="/en/Staff/Pages/secarl.aspx">Carl Seger</a>, division for Functional Programming, Chalmers University of Technology. <br />Industrial Partners: Pelagicore AB, LumenRadio AB och Ericsson. <br />The project is funded by <a href="https://strategiska.se/en/">Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research</a> with 31 million SEK. <br />Mon, 12 Feb 2018 00:00:00 +0100https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/e2/news/Pages/Can-computers-learn-how-to-diagnose-brain-diseases.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/e2/news/Pages/Can-computers-learn-how-to-diagnose-brain-diseases.aspxCan computers learn how to diagnose brain diseases?<p><b>​Imaging technology has revolutionized healthcare and is widely used for diagnosis before treatment or surgery. Despite these advances, routine clinical MRI data interpretation is mostly performed by medical experts. Is it possible to use deep learning to teach computers to diagnose brain diseases as well as or in some aspect even better than medical doctors?</b></p>​<span><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/E2/Nyheter/Kan%20datorer%20lära%20sig%20att%20diagnosticera%20hjärnsjukdomar/Inrene_Gu_200px.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><span style="display:inline-block"></span></span>Deep learning is about using powerful computers with embedded artificial intelligence to resemble the human brain's way of interpreting new information and draw conclusions in relation to what is already known. The difference is that computers, amongst other things, are able to analyse much larger amounts of data, which can be used to find better methods for solving difficult mathematical and technical problems.<br /><br />“Using a large amount of brain image data, deep learning methods can be used to find characteristic features related to some diseases, and provide powerful diagnostic tools to medical doctors”, says Irene Gu, Professor in the signal processing group at Chalmers. <br /><br />So far, only preliminary research work on deep learning is reported in the medical area. In computer vision, deep learning has reached or even surpassed human performance when it comes to face recognition. <br />Recently, Irene Gu has started a research initiative on brain image analytics using deep learning methods in close collaboration with medical doctors at Sahlgrenska University Hospital and several students. The question is: Would it be possible for artificial intelligence technology to diagnose Alzheimers’ disease, or to find brain tumors’ grading, by only using a large amount of brain image data?<br /><br />“We have obtained some initial promising results. Our ambition is to reach the performance of medical experts and yet in much simpler ways”, says Irene Gu.<br /><br /><strong>Detection of Alzheimer’s disease</strong><br />Alzheimer’s disease is a chronic neuro-degenerative disease currently incurable, its cause is not yet completely understood. According to WHO’s statistics in 2015, roughly 30 million people in the world suffer from Alzheimer’s. The symptoms consist of disorientation, language difficulties, memory loss, mood swings and many more. Early diagnosis and treatment can potentially slow down the development of the disease.<br /><br />Brain scans by magnetic resonance imaging, MRI, is a commonly used diagnostic method for detecting Alzheimer’s disease. This is often used in combination with other diagnostic methods involving a set of clinical exams, by observing the progression of dementia symptoms.<br /><br />“In this project, two dedicated deep learning methods, simple yet effective, have been developed for detection of Alzheimer’s disease. One method is based on 3D convolutional networks, another on 3D multiscale residual networks. We use a large amount of brain MRI scans to learn our computers the features of Alzheimer’s disease, and subsequently to detect Alzheimer’s patients from unseen scans”, Irene Gu explains. <br /><br />The study involved 340 subjects and about 1200 MR images, obtained from a public available dataset, Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI).<br /><br />“The proposed schemes have yielded high accuracies. For example, one method has reached an accuracy of 98,74 % on previously unseen MRI scans, and 90,11 % from MRI scans of unseen patients in the study. This almost reaches the highest state-of-the-art research results”, Irene Gu says. “This indicates that the method that we have developed is useful in this type of studies.”<br /><br />One of the projects was conducted by <a href="http://studentarbeten.chalmers.se/publication/252184-deep-learning-methods-for-mri-brain-image-analysis-3d-convolutional-neural-networks-for-alzheimers-d">Mahmood Nazari and Karl Bäckström as a master's thesis project</a>.<br />A paper submitted on this work has recently been accepted by IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical imaging (ISBI) 2018. Another MSc project is still ongoing.<br /><br /><strong>Brain tumor grading</strong><br />Encouraged by the good deep learning results using MR images, Irene Gu has started another project based on similar technology, performed by Karl Bäckström in 2017. <br /><br />“Thanks to the interest in computer-assisted brain tumor diagnostics shown by medical doctors at Sahlgrenska, and seed funding from the department of Electrical Engineering at Chalmers, we could perform a study on brain tumor (glioma) grading using deep learning”, says Irene Gu.<br /><br />A glioma is a type of tumor that starts in the glial cells of the brain or the spine. Gliomas comprise about 30 percent of all brain tumors and central nervous system tumors. About 80 percent of all malignant brain tumors are gliomas.<br /><br />The broad international collaboration networks, which the medical doctors are engaged in, have provided the researchers with brain tumor datasets from USA, France and Austria.<br />We have already obtained some promising results, though on relatively small datasets”, says Irene Gu. “Now we are conducting further in-depth research, where more students and researchers from Chalmers participate in close collaboration with Sahlgrenska University Hospital.”<br /><br />Text: Yvonne Jonsson<br /><br /><strong>More information</strong><br /><a href="/sv/personal/Sidor/Irene-Yu-Hua-Gu.aspx">Irene Gu</a>, Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering, Chalmers<br /><a href="mailto:irenegu@chalmers.se">irenegu@chalmers.se</a><br /><a href="mailto:irenegu@chalmers.se"></a><br /><a href="/en/departments/e2/research/Signal-processing-and-Biomedical-engineering/Pages/Image-and-video-analysis.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Read more about computer vision and medical image analysis</a><br />Thu, 08 Feb 2018 08:00:00 +0100https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Intense-laser-experiments-provide-first-evidence-that-light-can-stop-electrons.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Intense-laser-experiments-provide-first-evidence-that-light-can-stop-electrons.aspxLasers provide first evidence that light can stop electrons<p><b>​By hitting electrons with an ultra-intense laser, researchers have revealed dynamics that go beyond ‘classical’ physics and hint at quantum effects.</b></p><div>Whenever light hits an object, some of the light scatters back from the surface of the object. However, if the object is moving extremely fast, and if the light is incredibly intense, strange things can happen.</div> <div>Electrons, for example, can be shaken so violently that they actually slow down because they radiate so much energy. Physicists call this process ‘radiation reaction’.  <p></p> This radiation reaction is thought to occur around objects such as black holes and quasars (supermassive black holes surrounded by a disc of gas). Being able to measure radiation reaction in the lab will therefore provide insights into processes that occur in some of the most extreme environments in the universe. <p></p> Radiation reaction is also interesting to physicists studying effects beyond ‘classical’ physics, as the equations (known as Maxwell’s equations) that traditionally define the forces acting on objects fall short in these extreme environments. <p></p> Now, a team of researchers led by Imperial College London have demonstrated radiation reaction in the lab for the first time. <a href="https://journals.aps.org/prx/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevX.8.011020">Their results are published 7 February in the journal Physical Review X. </a><p></p> They were able to observe this radiation reaction by colliding a laser beam one quadrillion (a billion million) times brighter than light at the surface of the Sun with a high-energy beam of electrons. The experiment, which required extreme precision and exquisite timing, was achieved using the Gemini laser at the Science and Technology Facilities Council’s Central Laser Facility in the UK. <p></p> Photons of light that reflect from an object moving close to the speed of light have their energy increased. In the extreme conditions of this experiment, this shifts the reflected light from the visible part of the spectrum all the way up to high energy gamma rays. This effect let the researchers know when they had successfully collided the beams. <p></p> Senior author of the study, Dr Stuart Mangles from the Department of Physics at Imperial, said: “We knew we had been successful in colliding the two beams when we detected very bright high energy gamma-ray radiation.</div> <div>“The real result then came when we compared this detection with the energy in the electron beam after the collision. We found that these successful collisions had a lower than expected electron energy, which is clear evidence of radiation reaction.” <p></p> Study co-author Professor Alec Thomas, from Lancaster University and the University of Michigan, added: &quot;One thing I always find so fascinating about this is that the electrons are stopped as effectively by this sheet of light, a fraction of a hair's breadth thick, as by something like a millimetre of lead. That is extraordinary.&quot; <p></p> The data from the experiment also agrees better with a theoretical model based on the principles of quantum electrodynamics, rather than Maxwell’s equations, potentially providing some of the first evidence of previously untested quantum models. <p></p> <span><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/F/350x305/MattiasMarklund350x305.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" height="230" width="264" alt="" style="margin:5px" /></span>Study co-author Professor Mattias Marklund of Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, whose group were involved in the study, said: “Testing our theoretical predictions is of central importance for us at Chalmers, especially in new regimes where there is much to learn. Paired with theory, these experiments are a foundation for high-intensity laser research in the quantum domain.” <p></p> However more experiments at even higher intensity or with even higher energy electron beams will be needed to confirm if this is true. The team will be carrying out these experiments in the coming year. <p></p> The team were able to make the light so intense in the current experiment by focussing it to a very small spot (just a few micrometres - millionths of a metre - across) and delivering all the energy in a very short duration (just 40 femtoseconds long: 40 quadrillionths of a second). <p></p> To make the electron beam small enough to interact with the focussed laser, the team used a technique called ‘laser wakefield acceleration’. <p></p> The laser wakefield technique fires another intense laser pulse into a gas. The laser turns the gas into a plasma and drives a wave, called the wakefield, behind it as it travels through the plasma.  Electrons in the plasma can surf on this wake and reach very high energies in a very short distance. <br /><br /><p></p> <span><a href="https://journals.aps.org/prx/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevX.8.011020"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" /></a></span>Read the scientific article<a href="https://journals.aps.org/prx/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevX.8.011020"> ‘Experimental evidence of radiation reaction in the collision of a high-intensity laser pulse with a laser-wakefield accelerated electron beam’</a> in Physical Review X.<br /> <span style="display:inline-block"></span> <p></p> The  research at Chalmers University of  Technology has been funded by the Knut och Alice Wallenberg Foundation and the Swedish Research Council. <p></p> <h5 class="chalmersElement-H5">For more information, please contact:</h5> <a href="/sv/personal/redigera/Sidor/Mattias-Marklund.aspx"></a><span><div><span><span><a href="http://chalmers.se/en/Staff/Pages/Mattias-Marklund.aspx">Mattias Marklund</a><br />Professor, D</span></span>epartment of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden</div></span> <div>email: <a href="mailto:mattias.marklund@chalmers.se">mattias.marklund@chalmers.se</a></div> <div>Tel:  +46 31 772 39 39<br /></div> </div> Wed, 07 Feb 2018 17:00:00 +0100https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/tme/news/Pages/Social-innovation-project-gives-people-affected-by-cancer-strength-to-live.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/tme/news/Pages/Social-innovation-project-gives-people-affected-by-cancer-strength-to-live.aspxSweden&#39;s first support centre for people affected by cancer<p><b>​Strength to live and better psychosocial support. This is the goal for Kraftens Hus, Sweden’s first support centre for cancer patients and their families. Centre For Healthcare Improvement at Chalmers is an important part of this unique collaborative project.</b></p><div>​“You have cancer.”</div> <div>These three words change a person’s life, but also the lives of many around them. On receiving such a diagnosis, the patient, their family, relatives, friends, neighbours, colleagues and managers all have questions. The healthcare system takes care of the medical treatment, but who looks after everything else?</div> <div> </div> <div>“Cancer changes many aspects of life for everyone affected by the disease – at home with the family, at work and in other social contexts. We have therefore taken a new approach to how various resources and responsible authorities can join forces and develop the psychosocial support together,” says project manager Carina Mannefred from Regionalt Cancercentrum Väst (RCC Väst), the regional cancer centre in west Sweden.</div> <div> </div> <div>The pilot project is the result of unique collaboration involving patients, their families, RCC Väst, researchers from Chalmers, politicians and civil servants from Region Västra Götaland and representatives from a range of social welfare institutions and the business community in Borås.</div> <div> </div> <div>The initiative comes from people affected by cancer via RCC Väst’s Patient- och Närståenderåd, a regional council of cancer patients and their families who share their experiences and opinions of healthcare. Over 18 months the collaboration partners have met in design workshops and dialogue sessions to bring needs, requests and solutions to light. Study visits to support centres in the UK and Denmark have also been made.</div> <div> </div> <div>“The project is unique thanks to its co-creative approach: it is the result of collaboration between all relevant players in society together with the business community and the patients,” says Senior Lecturer Andreas Hellström at Centre For Healthcare Improvement at Chalmers University of Technology, who is leading the scientific part of the project regarding Kraftens Hus Sjuhärad. </div> <div> </div> <div>The non-profit organisation Kraftens Hus Sjuhärad was founded after the series of workshops. The premises are in Borås, but the support centre is for people affected by cancer throughout the whole of Sjuhärad: patients who are undergoing or have completed treatment and their families.</div> <div> </div> <div>Kraftens Hus is being partly funded through an annual grant from the Healthcare Board in Region Västra Götaland for three years and partly through sponsorship. This is a user-driven activity, which will be designed and developed on the basis of the visitors’ needs and requests.</div> <div> </div> <div>The opportunity to meet others in the same situation is key, but the centre also aims to a hub for information and activities by important welfare entities such as healthcare providers, the Swedish Social Insurance Agency and the Swedish Employment Service.</div> <div> <br /><br /><img src="/sv/institutioner/tme/nyheter/PublishingImages/KraftensHusPiaoLeni2_750x300.jpg" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><br /><strong><sub>Project that gives strength.</sub></strong><sub> Pia Bredegård has been declared free of her breast cancer and will work half-time at Kraftens Hus. Leine Persson Johansson lives with chronic lung cancer and is a patient representative on the board. “Ever since the day I entered the hospital I have felt extremely alone with my diagnosis and have asked about possible contact with others affected, perhaps a mentor system. Wow, it feels great to be part of launching such an activity now!” Leine says.</sub><br /><br /></div> <div>The goal is to supplement healthcare and provide emotional, social and practical support. Examples of other activities may include painting groups, discussion groups for children, yoga and walking groups, presentations on various themes and advice to managers on how they can support an employee who has cancer. The hope is that over time the model will reach the entire region and the rest of Sweden. </div> <div> </div> <div>“It’s not our intention to take over the healthcare system’s responsibility for cancer rehabilitation, but instead to be a supplement and offer activities that the system doesn’t have. Kraftens Hus will be a meeting place, where both patients and their families can meet other people in similar situations and chat in an informal context,” Carina Mannefred says.</div> <div> </div> <h4 class="chalmersElement-H4">ABOUT KRAFTENS HUS</h4> <div><a href="http://www.chalmers.se/sv/centrum/chi/forskning/Sidor/Kraftens-Hus-%E2%80%93-fr%C3%A5n-kraft-att-%C3%B6verleva-till-kraft-att-leva-.aspx">More information (in Swedish) about Chalmer’s part of Kraftens hus &gt;&gt; </a><br /><br />Read more (in Swedish) at<a href="http://www.kraftenshus.se/"> www.kraftenshus.se.</a><br /><a href="http://www.kraftenshus.se/"></a><br />Kraftens Hus will be officially opened on <strong>Wednesday 7 February, 2018</strong>. <br />Address: Träffpunkt Simonsland, floor 6, at Viskastrandsgatan 5 in Borås.<br /><br />Contact: Andreas Hellström, Chalmers, phone: +46 76 119 1423, <br />email: <a href="mailto:andreas.hellstrom@chalmers.se">andreas.hellstrom@chalmers.se</a><br /></div>Wed, 07 Feb 2018 00:00:00 +0100https://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/Organic-boat-building.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/Organic-boat-building.aspxOrganic boat building in a nutshell<p><b>​A dinghy with a core made of balsa wood, flax and a cashew nut based epoxy. That’s what eight students at Chalmers are working with this winter. Formula Sailing is a boat building project where 70 percent of the boat core has to be made of biomaterials. In September they will compete in Italy – and during ‘Båtmässan’ they will display the dinghy.</b></p><p>​Since August last year, the students have been designing and building the unusual race dinghy. All the boat builders are all students at the master’s programme Naval Architecture, after studying mechanical engineering their first three years at Chalmers.In an on-campus workshop, the students are laminating the balsa wood boat core with flax and cashew nut based epoxy. Erik Ericsson, one of the students in the project, has been in charge of choosing materials.<br />– We have chosen a core that is a softer and weaker material, balsa wood. And on each side of that core you have a laminate with several layers of flax/bioepoxy. That provides structure with stiffness and strength, says Eriksson. <br />– Epoxy is basically a form a glue that glues together the flax fibers with the core, says Simon Granli who’s also a part of the project group. <br />Eric Eriksson admits the chosen lamination won’t be as good as carbon fiber or glass fiber would be – but those are materials the rules of the competition won’t allow them to use. Based on the flax/cashew nut epoxy’s stiffness to its weight ratio, it’s one of the best possible choices from the organic world. <br />– The weight is important! The less the dinghy weighs, the faster is goes, says Granli. </p> <p><br /></p> <p><strong>Competing in Italy this fall</strong><br />Each year, boats representing universities all over the world compete in a three-day race. Last year, the competition was held in Palermo in September. The two main supervisors at Chalmers then attended the races to see and learn. Most likely the venue will be the same in 2018 and the time will again be late September. <br />During the summer, the Chalmers students will practice sailing the dinghy, and prepare for the competition. The rules state that the sailor of the boat must be a student from the same university as the design and building team, and the recruitment of this person who will be sailing is under way at the time of writing.<br /><br /><strong>Exhibition at Båtmässan</strong></p> <p>From the 3rd to 11th of February, Chalmers Formula Sailing will be exhibiting the sail dinghy at the boat fair, Båtmässan, at Svenska Mässan in Gothenburg, in booth number F04:21 (GKSS).</p> <p><br />See the <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XZWEhMJZuNU">video</a></p> <p>Read more about the <a href="/en/centres/sportstechnology/research/sailing/Pages/Formula-Sailing.aspx">Chalmers Formula Sailing project</a></p> <p><span id="ms-rterangepaste-end" style="display:inline-block"><br /></span></p> <strong>FACTS ABOUT THE COMPETITION:</strong><br />Conceive, Design, Implement and Operate are the keywords of the innovative so called CDIO initiative, where the student competition Formula Sailing is included. The goal of the CDIO initiative is to give students a technical fouknowledge base of real-life systems and products, complementing a technical education. Another example of a CDIO project where Chalmers is participating is Formula Student, where students design and build electrical vehicles to race other universities with.<br /><br />Formula Sailing is a part of the <a href="/en/centres/sportstechnology/Pages/default.aspx">Chalmers sports technology initiative</a>. <br /><br /><strong>Text:</strong> Sofia Larsson-Stern<br /><strong>Photo/video:</strong> Johan Bodell<br />Wed, 31 Jan 2018 00:00:00 +0100https://www.chalmers.se/en/researchinfrastructure/oso/news/Pages/Astrochemists-reveal-the-magnetic-secrets-of-methanol.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/researchinfrastructure/oso/news/Pages/Astrochemists-reveal-the-magnetic-secrets-of-methanol.aspxAstrochemists reveal the magnetic secrets of methanol<p><b>​A team of scientists, led by Boy Lankhaar at Chalmers University of Technology, has solved an important puzzle in astrochemistry: how to measure magnetic fields in space using methanol, the simplest form of alcohol. Their results, published in the journal Nature Astronomy, give astronomers a new way of investigating how massive stars are born.</b></p>​<span style="background-color:initial">Over the last half-century, many molecules have been discovered in space. Using radio telescopes, astronomers have with the help of these molecules been able to investigate just what happens in the dark and dense clouds where new stars and planets are born.</span><div> </div> <div>Scientists can measure temperature, pressure and gas motions when they study the signature of molecules in the signals they detect. But especially where the most massive stars are born, there’s another major player that’s more difficult to measure: magnetic fields.</div> <div> </div> <div>Boy Lankhaar at Chalmers University of Technology, who led the project, takes up the story.</div> <div> </div> <div>“When the biggest and heaviest stars are born, we know that magnetic fields play an important role. But just how magnetic fields affect the process is a subject of debate among researchers. So we need ways of measuring magnetic fields, and that’s a real challenge. Now, thanks to our new calculations, we finally know how to do it with methanol”, he says.</div> <div> </div> <div>Using measurements of methanol (CH<sub>3</sub>OH) in space to investigate magnetic fields was suggested many decades ago. In the dense gas surrounding many newborn stars, methanol molecules shine brightly as natural microwave lasers, or masers. The signals we can measure from methanol masers are both strong and emitted at very specific frequencies.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>“The maser signals also come from the regions where magnetic fields have the most to tell us about how stars form. With our new understanding of how methanol is affected by magnetic fields, we can finally start to interpret what we see”, says team member Wouter Vlemmings, Chalmers.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Earlier attempts to measure the magnetic properties of methanol in laboratory conditions have met with problems. Instead, the scientists decided to build a theoretical model, making sure it was consistent both with previous theory and with the laboratory measurements.</div> <div> </div> <div>“We developed a model of how methanol behaves in magnetic fields, starting from the principles of quantum mechanics. Soon, we found good agreement between the theoretical calculations and the experimental data that was available. That gave us the confidence to extrapolate to conditions we expect in space”, explains Boy Lankhaar.</div> <div> </div> <div>Still, the task turned out to be surprisingly challenging. Theoretical chemists Ad van der Avoird and Gerrit Groenenboom, both at Radboud University in the Netherlands, needed to make new calculations and correct previous work.</div> <div> </div> <div>“Since methanol is a relatively simple molecule, we thought at first that the project would be easy. Instead, it turned out to be very complicated because we had to compute the properties of methanol in great detail”, says Ad van der Avoird.</div> <div> </div> <div>The new results open up new possibilities for understanding magnetic fields in the universe. They also show how problems can be solved in astrochemistry – where the disciplines of astronomy and chemistry meet. Huib Jan van Langevelde, team member and astronomer at the Joint Institute for VLBI ERIC and Leiden University, explains.</div> <div> </div> <div>“It’s amazing that such detailed calculations are required to reveal the molecular complexity which we need to interpret the very accurate measurements we make with today’s best radio telescopes. It takes experts from both the chemistry and astrophysics disciplines to enable new discoveries in the future about molecules, magnetic fields and star formation”, he says.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><em><strong>Image and video</strong></em></div> <div><em><br /></em></div> <div><em>High-resolution images are available at <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/onsala/sets/72157692776402725">https://www.flickr.com/photos/onsala/sets/72157692776402725​</a></em></div> <div><em><strong><br /></strong></em></div> <div><div><span style="background-color:initial"><em>Image (top)</em></span><span style="background-color:initial"><em> – Magnetic fields play an important role in the places where most massive stars are born. This illustration shows the surroundings of a forming massive star, and the bright regions where radio signals from methanol can be found. The bright spots represent methanol masers – natural lasers that are common in the dense environments where massive stars form – and the curved lines represent the magnetic field. Thanks to new calculations by astrochemists, astronomers can now start to investigate magnetic fields in space by measuring the radio signals from methanol molecules in these bright sources. </em></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><em></em></span><em style="background-color:initial">Credit: <a href="http://www.astrosen.unam.mx/~wsteffen/">Wolfgang Steffen​</a>/Chalmers/Boy Lankhaar (molecules: Wikimedia Commons/Ben Mills)</em></div></div> <div><em style="background-color:initial"><br /></em></div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/SEE/Nyheter/methanol_animation1_72dpi_340.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px;font-style:italic;font-weight:600" /></div> <div><em style="background-color:initial"><br /></em></div> <div><em style="background-color:initial">Video – </em><span style="background-color:initial"><i>Watch an animated video about how stars are born and how methanol can now tell scientists more about how massive stars form: <a href="https://youtu.be/2X2d5ZbTdIY">www.youtu.be/2X2d5ZbTdIY</a></i></span></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"><em>Credit: Chalmers/Daria Dall'Olio/Boy Lankhaar (see link for full credits)</em></span></div> <em> </em><div><br /></div> <div>See other versions of this release<span style="background-color:initial">:</span><span style="background-color:initial"> </span><a href="http://jive.eu/astrochemists-reveal-magnetic-secrets-methanol">from JIVE (English)</a><span style="background-color:initial">,</span><span style="background-color:initial"> </span><a href="http://www.ru.nl/nieuws-agenda/nieuws/vm/imm/2018/astrochemici-onthullen-magnetische-geheimen/">from Radboud University (in Dutch)</a><span style="background-color:initial">, <a href="https://www.universiteitleiden.nl/nieuws/2018/01/astrochemici-onthullen-de-magnetische-geheimen-van-methanol">from Leiden University (in Dutch)</a>,</span><span style="background-color:initial"> </span><a href="http://www.astronomie.nl/#%21/home/_detail/external_gli/astrochemici-onthullen-de-magnetische-geheimen-van/">from NOVA (in Dutch)​</a><span style="background-color:initial"> and </span><a href="https://www.media.inaf.it/2018/01/29/i-segreti-magnetici-del-metanolo/">from INAF (in Italian)​</a><a href="https://www.media.inaf.it/2018/01/29/i-segreti-magnetici-del-metanolo/"></a></div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>More about the research</strong></div> <div><br /></div> <div>The research is published in the February 2018 edition of the journal Nature Astronomy, available online 29 January 2018. The paper is <em>Characterization of methanol as a magnetic field tracer in star-forming regions</em> <i style="background-color:initial"> </i><span style="background-color:initial">(<a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41550-017-0341-8">link to article​</a>; </span><span style="background-color:initial">doi: <a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41550-017-0341-8">10.1038/s41550-017-0341-8</a></span><span style="background-color:initial">) </span><span style="background-color:initial">by Boy Lankhaar (Chalmers), Wouter Vlemmings (Chalmers), Gabriele Surcis (Joint Institute for VLBI ERIC, Netherlands, and INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari, Italy), Huib Jan van Langevelde (Joint Institute for VLBI ERIC, Netherlands, and Leiden University, Netherlands), Gerrit C. Groenenboom and Ad van der Avoird (Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University, Netherlands). </span></div> <span></span><div></div> <div><br /></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">Support for this research was provided by the the Swedish Research Council (Vetenskapsrådet), and by the<br /></span><span style="background-color:initial">European Research Council (</span>ERC).<br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div>Boy Lankhaar was awarded the Royal Netherlands Chemical Society’s Golden Master prize for 2015 (<a href="https://en.kncv.nl/awards/kncv-golden-master-award">https://en.kncv.nl/awards/kncv-golden-master-award</a>) for his Master’s thesis work on this project at Radboud University, Nijmegen, Netherlands.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Contacts:</strong></div> <div> </div> <div>Robert Cumming, communicator, Onsala Space Observatory, Chalmers, tel: +46 31-772 5500 or +46 70 493 3114, robert.cumming@chalmers.se.</div> <div> </div> <div>Boy Lankhaar, Ph.D. student, Department of Space, Earth and Environment, Chalmers, tel: +46 31 772 55 42, boy.lankhaar@chalmers.se</div> <div><br /></div> ​Mon, 29 Jan 2018 17:00:00 +0100https://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/This-years-Chalmers-fence-measures-the-force-of-the-jumps-.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/This-years-Chalmers-fence-measures-the-force-of-the-jumps-.aspxThis year&#39;s Chalmers fence measures the force of the jumps<p><b>​For the third year in a row, the Gothenburg Horse Show is working with Chalmers University of Technology to determine the ultimate jump trajectory for horses. This year, they’ll be measuring the force of the horses’ take-off and landing. That’s never been done before.</b></p>​“We’re continuing to gather new information on how horses actually jump, findings that challenge the traditional image of horse jumping,” says Magnus Karlsteen, Associate Professor at Chalmers University of Technology.<br /><br />Force is in focus this year as Chalmers students continue to develop an ever-better understanding of how a horse jumps. By burying sensors before and after the fence, they’ll be able to measure the force of the horses’ push-off and landing.<br /><br />“We don’t know how much force a horse employs before and after a fence; no one in the world has measured this before,” Karlsteen says.<br /><br />As in previous years, the audience will see the results directly on the screens in the arena. The findings will be used as additional information which will allow Chalmers’ students to continue analysing jump trajectories.<br /><br />“It’s absolutely in the interest of the Gothenburg Horse Show to support the development of technical innovations that will improve horses’ endurance,” says Tomas Torgersen, Show Director of the of the Gothenburg Horse Show.<br /><br />The Chalmers Fence project is the work of Chalmers students who are using their expertise to develop unique measuring systems focusing on the health and well-being of the horses.<br /><br />The Chalmers fence project is the work of Chalmer's students who are using their expertise in technology to develop unique measuring systems focusing on the health and well-being of horses. Many of the students are pleased to be able to combine a passion for horses with their studies. <br /><br />“It’s an opportunity you get when you study at Chalmers, being able to combine your interests with your studies,” Karlsteen says.<br /><br /><a href="https://en.eurohorse.se/" target="_blank">The EuroHorse equestrian fair</a> on 22–25 February, which will take place during the Gothenburg Horse Show, will feature jumping obstacles and other equestrian research projects. Chalmers University of Technology is a national sports university. For more information on Chalmers’ equestrian projects, visit: <a href="/en/centres/sportstechnology/research/equestrian-sports/Pages/default.aspx" target="_blank">Equestrian sports at Chalmers</a><br /><br /><a href="http://www.gothenburghorseshow.com/en/" target="_blank">The Gothenburg Horse Show</a> is being arranged on 20–25 February 2018 by <a href="https://gotevent.se/en/" target="_blank">Got Event</a>, the event and arena company of the City of Gothenburg, which operates ten arenas in the city, including Scandinavium.<br /><br /><strong>For more information:</strong><br />
Tomas Torgersen, Show Director of the Gothenburg Horse Show, +46-031-368 44 53, <a href="mailto:tomas.torgersen@gotevent.se%E2%80%A8">tomas.torgersen@gotevent.se
</a><br />Magnus Karlsteen, Associate Professor in Physics, responsible for Equestrian sports at Chalmers University of Technology, +46-73-079 42 47, <a href="mailto:magnus.karlsteen@chalmers.se%E2%80%A8">magnus.karlsteen@chalmers.se
</a>Mon, 29 Jan 2018 11:00:00 +0100https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/mc2/news/Pages/Setting-up-a-new-laboratory-for-mechanical-quantum-device-research.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/mc2/news/Pages/Setting-up-a-new-laboratory-for-mechanical-quantum-device-research.aspxNew laboratory for mechanical quantum device research<p><b>​From Vienna to Gothenburg. Since April 2017 Witlef Wieczorek, assistant professor at the Quantum Technology Laboratory at MC2, has been planning and building a new laboratory with equipment, researchers and doctoral students. &quot;The infrastructure and the people who do research here at Chalmers and particularly at MC2 are impressive&quot;, he says.</b></p> <div>Witlef Wieczorek was originally hired as an assistant professor at the Quantum Device Physics Laboratory, but since 1 January 2018 he is a member of the newly established Quantum Technology Laboratory. He welcomes us to his new office in the MC2 building at Chalmers. The corridor on the fourth floor is the location of a brand-new research laboratory within Mechanical Quantum Devices in 2018, headed by Witlef. New instruments and machines are installed in the renovated facilities, which previously were used by Thorvald Andersson and his legendary MBE Group.</div> <div>&quot;Kaija Matikainen and Svante Pålsson from MC2 and Linus Andersson from Bength Dahlgren are important key persons for me, among many others. They help a lot with the lab space. Kaija was essentially in charge of the renovation of the office space. Mikael Fogelström and August Yurgens showed continued support for this renovation&quot;,  Witlef says.</div> <div> </div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/MC2/News/witlef_300px.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" />Two PhD students have already started in his lab, and more people are yet to come to work on different projects related to mechanical quantum devices. Witlef also welcomes interested master students to the new environment. Lots of new instruments are ordered and installed during the previous and upcoming months:</div> <div>&quot;Yes, an optical table like what photonics people have, a cryostat, a laser, optical modulation equipment, and some electronics equipment such as a frequency generator, a spectrum analyzer, an oscilloscope... and much much more&quot;, Witlef mentions, counting on his fingers.</div> <div> </div> <div>To set up a new laboratory is a complicated process which can take up until a year before it's alive and kicking.</div> <div>&quot;When all the equipment is there,  we have to make it work: connect, test and programme everything and then order the small things which we might have forgotten. Most of the time I buy new equipment, but sometimes it's possible to buy used one. Overall, it takes a lot of time until a lab is running. The good thing is that MC2 has an excellent cleanroom, so you can always work on fabricating your samples! The support from the cleanroom people is really wonderful. I'm very happy about it.&quot;</div> <div> </div> <div>Witlef Wieczorek was born in Berlin in 1979. </div> <div>&quot;I am born in the eastern side. If the Berlin wall hadn't fallen I wouldn't be here&quot;, he says.</div> <div>He now lives in a rented house in Västra Frölunda, together with his family; wife and two daughters, aged six and three years. The family has accustomed well to the new life in Gothenburg.</div> <div>&quot;We are all quite happy. My oldest daughter is going to preschool, and  she likes it very much. But in the beginning it was a bit hard, because of language and so on.&quot;</div> <div> </div> <h5 class="chalmersElement-H5">Do you like Gothenburg?</h5> <div>&quot;Yes! We like it very much. We have never lived close to the sea before and we currently really enjoy that. Every time the weather permits we take the ferries and go to the archipelago with the kids. We like to go and see nature, we use our bicycles quite a lot. Gothenburg is also a city that we can nicely explore with our kids, for example, all the family-friendly museums.  And, there's still a lot more to explore.&quot;</div> <div> </div> <div>Witlef's father was a physicist in Berlin. In his childhood, Witlef became interested and started to study physics too.</div> <div>&quot;At some point I thought I had to move out of the city, so I decided to go to Munich to do a PhD. It also came along with my interest in quantum physics and quantum optics.&quot;</div> <div>In Munich, Witlef became a member of the well-known Weinfurter Group at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (LMU University of Munich) and at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics in Garching, Germany.</div> <div>&quot;Then I started to do experiments on entangled photons, studying the weird predictions of quantum physics&quot;, Witlef tells us.</div> <div>He did his experiments at the Max Planck Institute.</div> <div>&quot;The idea of the research was essentially to study quantum information, to explore quantum information, to understand it a bit better by using the physical system of light or photons. It goes along at what Per Delsing and Göran Johansson are doing here; they're using superconducting qubits and now they want to build a quantum computer.&quot;</div> <div> </div> <h5 class="chalmersElement-H5">Tell us a bit about your PhD thesis!</h5> <div>&quot;My PhD was rather a bit more basic in the sense that I wanted to understand entanglement of multiple objects. We were quite successful in that respect, at that time it was really good to entangle six photons, and we could show that and analyze that.&quot;</div> <div> </div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/MC2/News/witlef_IMG_0353_350x305.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" />One day Witlef attended a lecture with Professor Markus Aspelmeyer from the Aspelmeyer Group at the University of Vienna. He is a pioneer in studying quantum objects with mechanical systems. The talk was so inspiring that Witlef felt that he wanted to do his PostDoc in his group. He got approved and moved to Vienna. </div> <div>His years in Vienna awaken thoughts to some day start his own research group.</div> <div>&quot;I thought that I sometime in my life wanted to do my own experiments and pursue my own ideas. That brought me here!&quot;, Witlef says.</div> <div> </div> <div>In 2016, Witlef Wieczorek applied for a position at MC2, when he got aware of a call for an assistant professorship in the Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Area of Advance. And in April 2017 he began his new appointment. Recently he switched to the newly established Quantum Technology Laboratory at MC2. </div> <div>&quot;I am really happy to be here. Definitely because of the research. The infrastructure and the people who do research here are impressive, the possibilities to interact and collaborate are excellent, and everybody's is very open. Another reason to go here is to learn a new language, I have started to learn Swedish!&quot;</div> <div> </div> <div>In his spare time, Witlef enjoys playing basketball, he was a skilled player once, and, of course, being with his family. He also likes beachvolleyball and literature. Among his favourite authors are Herman Hesse and José Saramago:</div> <div>&quot;Saramago has amazing sentences that go over one page, one has to get into that, and his books are really enjoyable, &quot;Blindness&quot; is very good for example. I also like &quot;The Gospel according to Jesus Christ&quot;, which is a very nice book.&quot;</div> <div> </div> <div>Text and photo: Michael Nystås</div> Thu, 18 Jan 2018 10:00:00 +0100https://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/ict/news/Pages/How-much-can-a-computer-understand.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/ict/news/Pages/How-much-can-a-computer-understand.aspxHow much can a computer understand?<p><b>​Machine learning has revolutionized computers understanding of language in just a few years. Yet they still do not truly understand what it is that they know.</b></p>​ <br />Some people are afraid that there will be a time when computers get so smart that they form liaisons and take over the world. Shalom Lappin, Professor of Computational Linguistics at the University of Gothenburg, is not one of them.<br /><br /><a href="https://clasp.gu.se/about/people/shalom-lappin" target="_blank"><img src="https://www.gu.se/digitalAssets/1551/1551090_1543951_shalomlappin.jpg" alt="Shalom Lappin, University of Gothenburg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" style="margin:5px" /></a>“The revolution in artificial intelligence that has arrived with the deep learning technology is still in its infancy, and even though it’s developing fast, I don’t think the idea of malicious super-agents is a real prospect that we have to worry about in the near future.” <br /><br /><strong>Computers only have the ability to reason</strong> about the task for which they are trained. They can find patterns and associations in millions of data, thus become better than humans in playing chess, translating and writing texts and driving a car. But as soon as we leave a specific and defined area and jump to another they are lost.<br /><br />“My personal feeling is that we will never quite get to the point where machines have something that resembles general reasoning power. But I could well be wrong”, says Shalom Lappin.<br /><br /><strong>Computers’ weakness is that they don’t really understand anything</strong>, adds Richard Johansson, Associate Professor at the division of Data Science at Chalmers. But with the help of machine learning, they can be very good at recognizing informative patterns. Therefore, they are very good at understanding languages in both speech and writing.<br /><br /><a href="http://www.cse.chalmers.se/research/lab/people/richard-johansson/" target="_blank"><img src="http://www.cse.chalmers.se/research/lab/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/1593485_img_4469-e1477032356847-237x300.jpg" alt="Richard Johansson, Chalmers" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" style="margin:5px;width:220px;height:278px" /></a>“The development is gradual, sometimes in leaps. Google translate is much better now than ten years ago, and today it provides useful translations, but I hardly believe that professional translators use it to any large extent”, says Richard Johansson, and mentions a problem area for machine translation:<br /><br />“The word &quot;it&quot; is translated with &quot;den&quot; or &quot;det&quot; in Swedish, and sometimes you may need to go back a few sentences to understand what “it” refers to to be correct.<br /><br />The improvement of Google's machine translations in recent years is largely due to the switch from statistical translation to a deep learning model. This allows the system to understand the context and thus generate improved translations.<br /><br /><strong>How good can computers get at recognizing patterns and relations?</strong> The sky is the limit, says Shalom Lappin, and mentions the development of facial recognition as an example where the computer is already superior to humans.<br /><br />Translations are the flagship area of machine learning technology today, but how well do computers perform on language processing? Imagine, for example, reading a text to a computer and getting it processed and rewritten. Richard Johansson thinks it’s not impossible.<br /><br />“First, your speech signal will be converted into text, and that technology is relatively good already. Then the text will be rendered into a grammatically well-structured language. I think that is fully operational within a few years.”<br /><br /><strong>Is there a risk that the personal language will disappear?</strong><br />&quot;Yes, should people get lazy and formulate carelessly, the language can certainly get more generic and less personal. On the other hand, I think it will take a long time before computers can make major changes in texts, such as moving paragraphs or sentences to make them well-structured&quot;, says Richard Johansson.<br /><br /><br /><br /><ul><li><strong>Artificial intelligence</strong> refers to computers that imitate human cognitive functions such as learning and problem solving.</li> <li><strong>Machine learning</strong> is, simply put, algorithms that are trained to draw conclusions based on large amounts of data.</li> <li><strong>Deep learning</strong> is machine learning that uses so-called neural networks (see below) as a model for learning.</li> <li><strong>Artificial neural networks</strong> are self-learning algorithms that imitate the model of biological neural networks (such as the brain). Artificial neural networks can often handle problems that are difficult to solve with conventional task-specific programming. A neural network must be trained with examples before it can fulfill its intended function.</li></ul> <p><br /></p> <p style="text-align:center"></p> <h4 class="chalmersElement-H4"><div>Welcome to our Initiative seminar on Digitalisation: </div> <div>Security &amp; Privacy | Machine Intelligence</div></h4> <p></p> <p>On 15 March 2018, Chalmers organise a second Initiative seminar on Digitalisation. This time we present a more in-depth programme – with half a day on Security and Privacy and the other half-day on Machine Intelligence.  </p> <p><a href="/en/areas-of-advance/ict/events/Digitalisation2018/Pages/default.aspx">See the programme and register for the seminar &gt;<br /></a></p> <p><a href="/en/areas-of-advance/ict/events/Digitalisation2018/Pages/default.aspx"></a><br /></p> Wed, 17 Jan 2018 09:00:00 +0100https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/mc2/news/Pages/Italian-researcher-strengthens-the-quantum-computer-project.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/mc2/news/Pages/Italian-researcher-strengthens-the-quantum-computer-project.aspxItalian researcher strengthens the quantum computer project<p><b>​The goal is to build a large quantum computer within ten years. But the task is extremely complicated and Chalmers University of Technology needs to recruit world-class expertise in a number of fields. First up is Giulia Ferrini – an expert in quantum computations in continuous variables.</b></p>The beginning of the year marked the launch of the Wallenberg Centre for Quantum Technology – a SEK 1 billion initiative to set Sweden on course to a global top position in quantum technology. The focus is on developing a quantum computer with much greater computing power than the best supercomputers of today; read more in <a href="/en/news/Pages/Engineering-of-a-Swedish-quantum-computer-set-to-start.aspx">Engineering of a Swedish quantum computer set to start</a>.<br /><br />Only a few days after the starting pistol was fired the theoretical physicist Giulia Ferrini is in place in her new university, Chalmers, where she is an eagerly awaited part in the quantum computer project.<br />“It’s amazing to become part of this adventure! Sweden is one of the places I would like to live. I like the culture and the society is advanced – it feels like living in the future”, says Ferrini, who was previously a Marie Curie fellow at the University of Mainz in Germany.<br /><br />As a physics student, she was amazed by the strange phenomena of quantum physics and this aroused her interest in quantum information. She is attracted by the potential of using the peculiarities of quantum physics to create practical benefits in the form of new technology, while this also gives her an excuse for exploring the fundamentals of quantum physics.<br />“I’m very curious. I like to start from an intuitive idea and then do the hard work required to formalise it and come up with proof or a model that others can test in the lab”, explains Ferrini.<br /><br />She is mainly interested in encoding quantum information in continuous variables such as in an electromagnetic field. The other main thrust in quantum computers is to encode information in what are known as qubits, with two quantum states representing zero and one. Both methods have their advantages and disadvantages, but so far Chalmers has focused mainly on qubits.<br />“Nobody knows yet what will work best in the end, and we need to know both methods. With Giulia Ferrini we are acquiring completely new expertise which fits very well with our own,” says Göran Johansson, Professor of Applied Quantum Physics, and one of the principal investigators in the quantum computer project.<br /><br />First of all, Ferrini together with Johansson will investigate and evaluate a new proposal on how to design a superconducting quantum computer, published by researchers in Canada. In parallel with this she will study where the boundary lies between what a standard computer and a quantum computer can do. The aim is to develop a criterion for what the minimum requirements are to achieve what is known as quantum supremacy, in other words to reach the point at which a quantum computer outperforms a standard computer.<br /><br />Two doctoral students are on their way in and Ferrini is looking forward to starting to build a research team, as well as collaborating both with the experimentalists at Chalmers and with other groups.<br />“Collaboration is fun and important for getting new ideas so that you can do relevant research,” says Ferrini.<br /><br />Beyond research, dance – in different styles – is her great interest. She describes herself as distinctly a city person, but has noticed that she appreciates the green space outside her new home in Gothenburg. In addition to finding a good place to dance, exploring the Swedish countryside is now also high up on her list.<br /><br />Text: Ingela Roos<br />Photo: Johan Bodell<br /><br />Read more about quantum computers in <a href="/en/news/Documents/quantum_technology_popdescr_171114_eng.pdf">Quantum technology – popular science description</a><br /><br />Read more about the <a href="/en/centres/wacqt/Pages/default.aspx">Wallenberg Centre for Quantum Technology</a><br />Tue, 16 Jan 2018 10:00:00 +0100https://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/Micromasters-programme.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/Micromasters-programme.aspxA Micromasters programme on electrified and autonomous vehicles<p><b>​Chalmers University of Technology launches Micromasters programme: A digital master’s-level credential to advance careers in the most in-demand fields of automotive engineering.</b></p><p>​Together with EdX, the nonprofit online learning destination founded by Harvard and MIT, Chalmers University of Technology today announced the launching of a flexible, affordable credential for career advancement and an accelerated Master’s degree. Scandinavia’s first MicroMasters® programme will be <em>Emerging Automotive Technologies</em>. <br /></p> <p>The programme is a result from Chalmers long term close collaboration with industry. Micromasters programmes offer a modular credential with a pathway to credit and are designed for learners looking for in-demand knowledge to advance their careers or follow a path to an accelerated on-campus programme.</p> <p>Chalmers is offering a Micromasters programme in Emerging Automotive Technologies, which provides learners with a holistic perspective on emerging technologies fostering sustainability and digitalization within the automotive industry through seven courses and a final capstone exam. This is an advanced, professional, graduate-level foundation in automotive engineering. It represents the equivalent of ca 20 credits of coursework at the Chalmers Masters programmes <em>Automotive Engineering or Systems, Control and Mechatronics.<br /></em></p> Chalmers University of Technology's Micromasters programme in Emerging Automotive Technologies is developed in cooperation with Volvo Cars, Volvo Group and Zenuity and designed to prepare learners for the careers in-demand today. <p>“Volvo Cars is facing a comprehensive competence transformation challenge to stay competitive in the automotive market. Electrification, connectivity and automation is driving a paradigm shift. We believe the ChalmersX Emerging Automotive Technologies Micromasters programme is a valuable complementary tool for both internal training as well as the external recruitment base capabilities” says Mats Moberg, Vice President Complete Vehicle Engineering, Volvo Cars R&amp;D.</p> <p>.</p> <p>Since </p> <p>September 2016, EdX and 25 international partners have launched 46 Micromasters programmes, offering courses in popular subjects, such as cybersecurity, business analytics, data science, artificial intelligence and user experience design. Chalmers University of Technology joins EdX and top global university partners in expanding the initiative, offering learners everywhere access to high-quality, career-focused education.</p> <p>“We are honored to work with Chalmers University of Technology to launch a Micromasters programme in Emerging Automotive Technologies. This offering marks an exciting step toward furthering our shared mission to expand access to high-quality education,” says Anant Agarwal, CEO at EdX and professor at MIT. “The Micromasters programmes on EdX empower learners everywhere to improve their lives and advance their careers. Signaling the next level of innovation in learning, Micromasters programmes are designed to meet the needs of both universities and employers, by providing learners with the in-demand knowledge and skills needed for success in today’s rapidly-evolving and tech-driven world</p> <p>.”</p> <p>Emerging Automotive Technologies begins on March 1st 2018 and is open for enrollment today.</p> <p><br />Watch a <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lgD5Xdc6I3w">video </a>about the Emerging Automotive Technologies programme</p> <p><br /></p> <p><a href="http://bit.ly/2kY1eMy"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Read more and r</a><span>egister</span> (External website)</p> <p><br /></p> <p><a href="/en/education/moocs/MicroMasters/Pages/default.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Read more about Micromaster programmes at Chalmers University of Technology</a><br /></p>Fri, 12 Jan 2018 10:00:00 +0100https://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/Chalmers-gives-you-Scandinavia’s-best-start-of-your-career.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/Chalmers-gives-you-Scandinavia%E2%80%99s-best-start-of-your-career.aspxChalmers gives your career Scandinavia’s best start<p><b>​A Master&#39;s at Chalmers University of Technology is a really good investment in your future career. One strong indication is QS Graduate Employability Rankings 2017, which ranks Chalmers University of Technology highest among Nordic universities.</b></p>​Can I get a good job? Which employers will I get in touch with through the university I choose? Do they employ international students?<br /><br />Questions like these weigh very strongly when considering higher studies abroad. They effectively boil down to one factor: Employability.<br /><br />When QS evaluates how employable students from different universities are, <a href="https://www.topuniversities.com/university-rankings/employability-rankings/2018" target="_blank">Chalmers University of Technology is top-ranked in the Nordic region</a>, and placed in position no 67 globally. QS is following five factors.<br /><br /><ul><li>Chalmers University of Technology comes out strongest among the Nordic universitites (and no 7 in Europe) in terms of how many employers students meet on campus. Such connections build networks and can lead to internships and project opportunities. There are plenty of such occasions every year at Chalmers’ campus.</li> <li>The second success factor is how closely industry partners cooperate with Chalmers researchers and teachers. Here Chalmers University of Technology also reaches seventh position in Europe, and top 20 globally in the QS ranking. Other measurements, by for instance <a href="https://www.timeshighereducation.com/features/universities-with-biggest-corporate-links" target="_blank">Times Higher Education</a>, show that <a href="/en/news/Pages/One-of-the-strongest-links-to-industry-in-the-university-world.aspx" target="_blank">Chalmers belongs to top-ten in the world in co-publishing with industry</a>. Chalmers University of Technology has close relationships with players in more industries than other universities at the top tier of the same lists, such as world-leading companies in the automotive industry, life science, telecom and the power sector.</li> <li>Reputation is also important. In the QS employer reputation survey Chalmers University of Technology turns out second in the Nordic region. In Swedish surveys among the public, <a href="http://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/Chalmers-reputation-highest-in-Sweden.aspx" target="_blank">Chalmers has been Sweden's highest-rated institution for six consecutive years</a>. Many Swedes have the opinion that an education at Chalmers is the best start on a good career.</li> <li>More than half of Chalmers’ students get their first job before graduation, shown by internal statistics. Over 90 percent have a relevant job within six months.</li> <li>Some become high-performers and get top positions later in their career. Alumni <a href="https://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/international/business/ikea-group-appoints-jesper-brodin-new-ceo/articleshow/58831557.cms" target="_blank">Jesper Brodin is CEO of Ikea</a>, Ludwig Strigeus and <a href="/en/collaboration/alumni/chalmersprofiles/Pages/Martin-Lorentzon---Founder-of-Spotify.aspx" target="_blank">Martin Lorentzon belong to Spotify's founders</a> and owners. <a href="https://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/politics-and-nation/volvo-ceo-martin-lundstedt-meets-pm-modi/articleshow/57738182.cms" target="_blank">Martin Lundstedt</a> is CEO of Sweden's largest company, the Volvo Group. These are some examples. International graduates Aiden Taghizdeh work for Tesla and Grannaz Amirjamshidi for Jabil, both in the San Francisco Bay area. In Denmark alumnus Ning Tan is making a career in life science. Others make a brilliant research career. <a href="/en/departments/e2/news/Pages/Swedish-robotic-arm-interested-the-President-of-France.aspx" target="_blank">Max Ortiz Catalan</a> came to Chalmers as a Masters student from Mexico and has now presented the world's first mind-controlled arm prosthesis for the French President Emmanuel Macron.</li></ul> All above is linked to factors weighed into the QS employability index.<br /><br />As an international student you may also enjoy the unique living environment that Sweden and other Nordic countries offer. Many studies show that the <a href="http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2227334/Scandinavian-countries-list-worlds-prosperous-nations--U-S-drops-time.html" target="_blank">Nordic region is innovative, modern and offer gender equality and great individual freedom</a> – and therefore a very attractive part of the world to settle down or evolve from.<br /><br />If Sweden is attractive to you, Chalmers should be a natural choice for starting an international career, being <a href="/en/news/Pages/Chalmers-is-one-of-Swedens-most-international-universities.aspx" target="_blank">one of Sweden's most international universities</a>. In addition, if you want to start a tech business, or strengthen your <a href="/en/research/society-industry/venturecreation/Pages/default.aspx" target="_blank">entrepreneurial ability</a>, Chalmers offers opportunities like few other universities in the world.<br /><br />Read more about: <a href="/en/education/Pages/default.aspx" target="_blank"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Education at Chalmers</a><br />Thu, 21 Dec 2017 00:00:00 +0100https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/bio/news/Pages/Yeast-can-be-engineered-to-create-protein-pharmaceuticals.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/bio/news/Pages/Yeast-can-be-engineered-to-create-protein-pharmaceuticals.aspxYeast can be engineered to create protein pharmaceuticals<p><b>​It took several years, but a research team headed by Professor Jens Nielsen at Chalmers University of Technology has finally succeeded in mapping out the complex metabolism of yeast cells. The breakthrough, recently published in an article in Nature Communications, means a huge step forward in the potential to more efficiently produce protein therapies for diseases such as cancer.</b></p>​The market for pharmaceuticals that mimic the body’s own proteins – protein-based therapeutics – is exploding. Some of them are relatively simple to manufacture in yeast-based cell factories. Insulin and HPV vaccine are two examples that are already under production, but other therapies, such as antibodies to various forms of cancer, are significantly more difficult to manufacture.<br /><br /><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/Bio/SysBio/news201712_JN.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" width="130" height="159" alt="" style="margin:5px" />“They are currently produced using a cell factory based on a single cell from a Chinese hamster. It’s an extremely expensive process. If we can get yeast cells to do the same thing, it will be significantly cheaper – perhaps 10% of what it costs today. Our vision is to eventually be able to mass-produce and supply the entire world with therapies that are too expensive for many countries today,” says Jens Nielsen, professor of systems biology.<br /><br /><span><span><span><span><span><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/Bio/SysBio/news201712_DP.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" width="130" height="160" alt="" style="margin:5px" /></span></span></span></span></span>In collaboration with Associate Professor Dina Petranovic and Mathias Uhlén’s<span><span></span></span> research<span><span><span></span></span></span> team at the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Jens Nielsen has been mapping <span><span><span><span></span></span></span></span>out th<span></span>e complex metabolism of yeast cells for four years.<br /><br />“We’ve been studying the metabolism of a yeast that we already know is a good protein producer. And we found the mechanisms that can be used to make the process even more efficient. The next step is to prove that we can actually produce antibodies in such quantities that costs are reduced.”<br /><br />The discussion has mainly been about cancer, but there are many other diseases, for example Alzheimer’s, diabetes and MS, that could potentially be treated by yeast-based protein therapies. How distant a future are we talking about?<br /><br />“Our part of the process is fast, but pharmaceuticals always take a long time to develop. It could be a possibility in five years, but should absolutely be on the market in ten,” Nielsen says.<br /><br />Jens Nielsen has been making headlines the past few months. In addition to his publication in Nature Communications, he has recently received three prestigious awards.<br /><br />On 31 October he received the world’s biggest award for innovation in alternative fuels for transportation – <a href="http://www.fuelchoicessummit.com/Award.aspx" target="_blank">the Eric and Sheila Samson Prime Minister’s Prize</a>, in Israel. Alternative fuels? Yes, plain old yeast can be used for a lot, and Nielsen’s award was for his contribution to processes for producing hydrocarbons from yeast, which will advance new biofuels. Earlier in October he received the prestigious <a href="/en/news/Pages/Energy-award-to-Jens-Nielsen-for-biofuels-from-yeast.aspx" target="_blank">Energy Frontiers Award from the Italian oil company Eni</a> for the same type of research. And just a week before he left for Israel, he was awarded the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences (IVA)’s gold medal for innovative and creative research in systems biology.<br /><br />“Yeast is a superb modelling system. Almost everything in yeast is also found in humans. We have complete computer models of the metabolism of yeast, and we use the same type of models to study human metabolism,” Nielsen explained when he received the IVA award. <br /><br /><strong>More about making the metabolism in yeast more effective</strong><br />The protein production of yeast cells comprises more than 100 different processes in which proteins are modified and transported out of the cell. Around 200 enzymes are involved, which makes it a very complex system to engineer. In order to optimize protein production, it is necessary to chart how these 200 enzymes function and work. In the study, this has been done by altering the genetic set of certain key genes, using advanced screening methods in combination with modern genome sequencing techniques.<br /><br />Read more about how in the scientific article in Nature Communications: <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-017-00999-2" target="_blank">Efficient protein production by yeast requires global tuning of metabolism</a><br /><br />Text: Christian BorgMon, 11 Dec 2017 11:00:00 +0100https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/mc2/news/Pages/Prestigious-EU-funding-for-Victor-Torres-Company.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/mc2/news/Pages/Prestigious-EU-funding-for-Victor-Torres-Company.aspxPrestigious EU funding for photonic research<p><b>​Victor Torres Company, Associate Professor at the Photonics Laboratory at MC2, has been awarded a prestigious Consolidator Grant by the European Research Council. He is one of only 14 Swedish researchers and the only one at Chalmers who receives the award. &quot;It feels great of course! I will have the chance to devote more time and efforts to an exciting line of research,&quot; says Victor Torres Company.</b></p><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/MC2/News/victgor_torres_IMG_0316_300px.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" width="233" height="350" alt="" style="margin:5px" />ERC Consolidator Grant is one of the finest personal research grants available from the European Research Council (ERC). Competition is razor sharp. Of the 2 538 applicants from all over Europe, only 329 were successful in this round. They were granted a total of 630 million euro.<br /><br />Victor Torres Company receives a total of 2.2 million euro to lead the five-year project &quot;Dark Soliton Engineering in Microresonator Frequency Combs&quot;.<br />&quot;It is about understanding and developing a special type of laser called &quot;frequency comb” in a highly integrated nanophotonic platform. The scientific aim is reaching a performance suitable for the fiber-optic communication systems of the future&quot;, he explains.<br /><br />It's not the first time Victor has applied for the grant:<br />&quot;I had tried the ERC before and, although I was very close, I didn’t manage to get the funding. So, I'm very happy that my perseverance has given the expected results!&quot;, he says.<br /><br />Text and photo: Michael Nystås<br /><br /><a href="https://erc.europa.eu/funding/consolidator-grants">Read more about the ERC Consolidator Grant</a> &gt;&gt;&gt;<br /><br /><a href="https://erc.europa.eu/news/erc-2017-consolidator-grants-results">Read more about the 2017 application round</a> &gt;&gt;&gt;<br />Tue, 05 Dec 2017 11:00:00 +0100