Arni Halldorsson

Professor, Technology Management & Economics

Árni Halldórsson is Professor in Supply Chain Management. Born in Iceland, studied for BSc in Business Administration and MSc Logistics & Innovation at Copenhagen Business School (CBS), Denmark. After completing his PhD from CBS, Árni held position as an Assistant Professor and later Associate Professor there until 2006. Until his appointment at Chalmers in January 2011, Árni served as Associate Professor as well as Academic Director of MBA at University of Southampton, UK.

See further on Research and Teaching below.

Key research topics include supply chain management and sustainable development, in particular sustainable logistics and -services, energy efficiency in the supply chain, outsourcing, supplier relationship management, and lean energy.

On Editorial Advisory Board for European Management Journal; Supply Chain Management: An International Journal; International Journal of Physical Distribution and Logistics Management; International Journal of Logistics: Research & Application; and Logistics Research. On Editorial Review Board for Journal of Supply Chain Management, and International Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management.

Linkedin profile: https://se.linkedin.com/in/arnihalldorsson
  • ​Purchasing & Supply Management TEK 416 (masters course in the Supply Chain Management programme)
  • Service  Management TEK 590 (masters level, elective course)
  • Sustainable Logistics ITR 361 (masters level, elective)
  • Sourcing Strategies (professional education)

Sustainable supply

 

My current research is perhaps best summarised as sustainable supply. Sustainable supply refers to structures and management of supply chains where economic, environmental, and social performance intersect. Here I seek to respond to and further shape societal challenges such as sustainable development (e.g. climate change, resource utilisation) as well as the industrial challenge of digitalisation, servitisation, and the ‘knowing-doing gap’ of ‘how to make it happen’. This is based upon recent developments in the field of supply chain management and logistics, and related disciplines of services management, operations management, and organisation theory. On the backdrop of this, sustainable supply seeks to develop principles for improved practice, in which people play a key role.

 

The first stream of research focuses on sustainable logistics services:

  • *The Fifth Fuel - Energy Efficiency Through Effective Freight Transport in Sustainable Urban Areas
  • *ELIN -- Energy Efficiency of Logistics Services – Inside Out
  • Sustainable supply chain design
  • Sourcing strategies for sustainable supply
  • Sustainable operations through lean energy


The second stream of research focuses on emerging technology in the supply chain, and seeks to combine the implications of sustainability and digitalisation through the concept of ‘services’ in the wider context of a supply chain. Parts of this research focuses on logistics services providers, their customers and end-users (service triads):

  • Logistics services
  • Service triads (providers, customers, end-users)
  • After-market supply chains (connected vehicles)
  • Service bundles and digitally connected services in the supply chain
  • Employee flexibility in operations in the era of digitalization

 

The third stream of research refers to theory and methodology required to deliver into the promise of ‘principles’ and ‘practices’ through ‘people’. This is primarily driven by:

  • Theorizing through conceptualization and frameworks, through ‘sensitivity to the context’ and through application of concepts and frameworks (see e.g. Halldórsson et al. 2007; Halldórsson et al. 2015).  
  • Developing appropriate methodology (research methods and –processes) that promote creation of actionable knowledge. This is to a large extent informed by critical realism, and it’s view on context, open systems, and generative mechanisms that possess causal power (that may or may not be actualized). See e.g. Aastrup and Halldórsson (2008).

 *Funded by the Swedish Energy Agency, Logistik och transportstiftelsen (LTS) and Chalmers Area of Advance Transport.

Published: Thu 17 May 2018.