Chemistry

The graduate school is organised within the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering.
 
Director of Graduate Studies: Joakim Andréasson

Syllabus

Established by the Vice President on 2005-05-17, reference number C2005/604.
Latest revised on 2021-06-24, reference number K 2021-0125. 
This syllabus applies to doctoral students admitted as of 2021-08-01.
Regarding older syllabus, please contact the first vice/vice head of department.

Transitional regulations: 
A doctoral student admitted to an older syllabus may earn a degree in accordance with this, provided that the current Appointment regulation for doctoral programmes and current Local Qualifications Framework – third cycle qualifications are followed. 

Doctoral students admitted to an older syllabus of graduate school Chemistry can, however, change to the current syllabus by an application to the Vice Head of Department. The change must be documented in the individual study plan. 

The graduate school is regulated by the Appointment regulation for doctoral programmes and the Local Qualifications Framework for Chalmers University of Technology - third cycle qualifications and is described in the syllabus for the graduate school. In the event of any conflict between the documents, the Appointment regulation for doctoral programmes and the Local Qualifications Framework for Chalmers University of Technology - third cycle qualifications are governing. For the most recent version of all regulatory documents referenced in this syllabus, see Chalmers’s internal website. 

1. Subject description 

Description of subject 

Chemistry is the area of knowledge which deals with the composition, structure and features of substances, the reactions which transfer substances to other substances and the different types of energy changes which accompany these reactions. Chemistry is a basic natural science, which among other things means that research and doctoral programmes are mainly governed by intrascientific arguments and criteria. This of course does not prevent industrial and social needs from playing a major role when research problems are formulated, and projects organised. 

The special orientations at the graduate school of chemistry at Chalmers are presented in the following section. 

Description of specializations 

Analytical chemistry
Analytical chemistry involves the quantitative and qualitative measurement of atoms, molecules, particles, in all forms of complex samples ranging from fluids, gases and solids to cells and tissues from a chemical perspective. Analytical chemistry pushes the limits of measurement science through the development of cutting-edge instrumentation and application of new technologies. Research spans over the traditional areas of analytical chemistry, including separations, spectroscopy, electrochemistry and mass spectrometry. 

Applied Surface Chemistry 
Applied surface chemistry covers technical applications of surface chemistry and has its theoretical basis in physical chemistry. The discipline can be divided into 1) surface and colloid chemistry, and 2) solid surface chemistry. Applications include the food and pharmaceutical industry, as well as the paper and mining industry. Materials technology is another important area, where superabsorbents, catalysts, fuel cells, batteries and biomaterials are examples with extensive research in this field. 

Biochemistry 
Biochemistry concerns the study of the chemistry of life itself and the molecular processes involved. Topics for study include the structure and function of different classes of biomolecules such as proteins, nucleic acids and lipids, as well as the interactions between such molecules that are important in understanding biochemical processes. The subject is cross-disciplinary and connects to other areas such as biophysical chemistry, bioanalytical chemistry, and bioorganic chemistry.

Industrial materials recycling 
Industrial materials recycling covers all disciplines of chemistry, from basic science to development of industrial processes. The main direction is recovery of metals from waste flows, but also other waste materials such as plastics, ceramics and cements are handled. To achieve this, separation of several elements from each other is required, where typical separation methods are solvent extraction, electrochemistry and pyrochemistry as well as mechanical separation methods.

Inorganic chemistry
Inorganic chemistry strives for a fundamental understanding of reactions, structure and bonding in inorganic, organometallic, metal-organic and bio-inorganic compounds, molecules, substances and materials. This knowledge is important in other disciplines such as catalysis, energy conversion and energy storage, efficient process technology, sensors, corrosion, metalloproteins, medical implants, biological process, electronics, information and communication technology, and nanoscience. 

Nuclear chemistry 
Nuclear chemistry, with roots in both chemistry and nuclear physics, deals with the chemical aspects of nuclear science and plays a central role in nuclear power technology as well as medicine and environmental applications. The subject covers the study of mechanisms and products in conjunction with nuclear reactions and radioactive decay, production of radioactive nuclides, separation of isotopes, chemistry of radioactive elements, the interaction of ionising radiation with materials, radiation protection and radioactive tracers. 

Organic Chemistry 
Organic chemistry concerns the synthesis, reactions and properties of carbon compounds. The subject includes areas such as physical organic chemistry, organometallic chemistry, asymmetric synthesis, organocatalysis, bioorganic chemistry, green chemistry, modification of solid materials such as cellulose, and the synthesis of biologically active compounds. A new and exciting area of research is graphene chemistry, with a highly interdisciplinary character.

Pharmaceutical technology 
Pharmaceutical technology concerns the manufacturing and studies of drug formulations as liquids, gels and tablets. A modern drug contains not only the active compound but also many excipients (additives) to give the product the desired properties for storage and use, and to facilitate its preparation. Pharmaceutical technology is therefore to a large extent involved in manufacturing and characterization of the excipients and their properties using methods such as DSC, NMR and rheology. 

Physical chemistry 
Physical chemistry covers the theoretical basis for chemistry, including areas such as thermodynamics, reaction kinetics, quantum chemistry, molecular spectroscopy, biophysical chemistry, photochemistry and electrochemistry. Topics of interest are mechanisms for energy- and electron-transfer for harvesting solar energy and for photocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide, photochromic systems with applications in biochemistry and fluorescent materials, interactions of nucleic acids with drugs and enzymes, as well as microscopic techniques and nanofluidics for lipid membranes.

Theoretical Chemistry 
Theoretical chemistry revolves around the prediction of molecular and material properties using quantum mechanical calculations. Developments in theoretical chemistry is resulting in a cross-disciplinary materials revolution, where the time from idea to realization of new solar cells, energy dense fuels and more effective drug molecules is shorter than ever before. Theoretical chemistry enables the study of materials before they exist, and of chemistry that is difficult to achieve in a laboratory. 

2. Objectives of the doctoral program 

Objectives 

The national objectives for third cycle degrees (licentiate and doctoral degree) and local requirements are stated in the Local Qualifications Framework for Chalmers University of Technology – third cycle qualifications. 

3. Entry requirements 

General entry requirements 

To be qualified for admission in the Chemistry graduate school the student must have earned a degree at the second-cycle level. The orientation of the student’s degree shall also have a sufficiently close connection to the subject of the doctoral programme. Equivalent requirements apply to individuals who have taken their first degree in a country other than Sweden. The examiner, in consultation with the principal supervisor, shall assess whether the applicant has the requisite capacity to successfully complete the doctoral programme. Other requirements for general entry are regulated in Appointment regulation for doctoral programmes. 

Admission

Regulations regarding admission are stated in Appointment regulation for doctoral Programmes. 

4. Curriculum 

The study programme towards a doctoral degree encompasses 240 higher education credits. The study programme towards a licentiate degree encompasses 120 higher education credits. One year of full-time studies equals 60 credits. 

For the licentiate degree programme the credits are distributed between courses and thesis work as follows: courses 30 credits and thesis 90 credits.

For the doctoral degree programme the credits are distributed between course work and thesis work as follows: courses at least 60 credits and thesis at least 180 credits.

Courses

Courses within the graduate school include general courses that cover all doctoral programmes at Chalmers as well as courses specific for the graduate school. 

General courses in Chalmers’s doctoral programmes
The general course requirements for doctoral programmes at Chalmers are regulated in Local Qualifications Framework for Chalmers University of Technology – third cycle qualifications. 

Courses specific for the Graduate school
The following courses are recommended for the respective specialization:

Analytical Chemistry
  • Advanced Analytical Chemistry (7.5 hp)
Physical Chemistry 
It is recommended to take at least two of the following courses:
  • Applied Optical Spectroscopy (7.5 hp)
  • Biophysical Chemistry (7.5 hp)
  • Physical Organic Chemistry (15 hp)
  • Laser Fundamentals for Chemists (7.5hp)
  • Dynamic Electrochemistry (6 hp)
  • Electron Transfer in Chemistry (7.5 hp)
Industrial Materials Recycling
It is recommended to take at least two of the following courses:
  • Solvent Extraction Course (7.5 hp)
  • Waste Management (7.5 hp)
  • Design and analysis of experiments (7.5 hp)
  • Thermodynamics (7.5 hp)
  • Organic chemistry (12 hp)
Nuclear Chemistry
It is recommended to take at least two of the following courses:
  • Chemistry of Lanthanides, Actinides and Super-Heavy Elements (7.5 hp)
  • Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry (7.5 hp)
  • Radioecology and Radioanalytical Chemistry (7.5 hp)
  • Applied Nuclear Chemistry - Nuclear Chemistry II (7.5 hp)
  • Solvent Extraction Course (7.5 hp)
Inorganic Chemistry
  • Chemistry of the Elements (15 hp)
Organic Chemistry
  • Physical Organic Chemistry (15 hp)
  • Advanced Organic Synthesis (15 hp)
Theoretical Chemistry
It is recommended to take at least two of the following courses:
  • Theoretical Chemistry (7.5hp)
  • Quantum Engineering (7.5 hp)
  • Computational Materials Physics (7.5 hp) 

Licentiate thesis

A licentiate thesis shall be written in English. In exceptional cases it can be written in Swedish; in such cases it shall contain a summary in English. 

The purpose of the licentiate thesis is to account for the relevant scientific results that have been attained during the thesis work and describe these in a way that is accessible outside of the scientific inner circle of researchers. A licentiate thesis can either be written as a compilation thesis or as a monograph. If the licentiate thesis is a compilation thesis it should begin with an introduction, a summarizing text, followed by the included scientific articles. The purpose of the summarizing text is to put the studies in context, and to present relevant results that for various reasons are not described within the articles. 

The preferred format is a compilation thesis. 

Alternative 1: The compilation of articles in the thesis includes at least two articles where at least one is accepted/published in an international peer-reviewed scientific journal. The licentiate thesis is examined by the Director of Graduate Studies in Chemistry before printing. 

Alternative 2: None of the compiled articles are accepted/published; or the number of compiled articles is less than two; or the licentiate thesis is a monograph. Referee review takes place according to the department's routines. 

Other regulations concerning the licentiate thesis are stated in Appointment regulation for doctoral Programmes.
 
Doctoral thesis 
A doctoral thesis shall be written in English. In exceptional cases it can be written in Swedish; in such cases it shall contain a summary in English. 
 
The purpose of the doctoral thesis is to account for the relevant scientific results that have been attained during the thesis work and describe these in a way that is accessible outside of the scientific inner circle of researchers. A doctoral thesis can either be written as a compilation thesis or as a monograph. If the doctoral thesis is a compilation thesis it should begin with an introduction, a summarizing text, followed by the included scientific articles. The purpose of the summarizing text is to put the studies in context, and to present relevant results that for various reasons are not described within the articles. 

The preferred format is a compilation thesis. 

Other regulations concerning the dissertation are stated in Appointment regulation for doctoral Programmes. 

Supervision 

The Appointment regulation for doctoral Programmes states that for each doctoral student at least two supervisors and one examiner shall be appointed. One of the supervisors shall be appointed principal supervisor. The doctoral student has the right to supervision during the studies unless the Head of Department decides otherwise. 

Other regulations concerning supervision are stated in Appointment regulation for doctoral Programmes. 

5. Examination 

After completion of a doctoral programme a doctoral degree is awarded. A licentiate degree can be an intermediate stage in a doctoral degree. If a licentiate degree is not a part of the individual study plan, an interim seminar shall be held to denote that licentiate level has been reached. For PhD-students employed at the department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, a licentiate degree is strongly recommended. 

Examination, licentiate degree

For a licentiate degree to be awarded, the doctoral student must have received a grade of pass for the licentiate thesis and its presentation and must also have received a grade of pass for the other elements that are included in the programme. 

Examination, doctoral degree 

For a doctoral degree to be awarded, the doctoral student must have had a dissertation and its defence approved and must also have passed the other elements that are included in the programme. 

Other regulations regarding examination are stated in:
  • Appointment regulation for doctoral Programmes
  • Local Qualifications Framework for Chalmers University of Technology – third cycle qualifications

6. Title of degree

The title of qualification is Teknologie doktorsexamen i Kemi or Filosofie doktorsexamen i Kemi. The English translation of the title of the qualification is Degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Chemistry. 

For a licentiate degree the title of the qualification is Teknologie licentiatexamen i Kemi or Filosofie licentiatexamen i Kemi. The English translation of the title of qualification is Degree of Licentiate of Engineering in Chemistry or Degree of Licentiate of Philosophy in Chemistry.

The degree is given a title corresponding to the name of the faculty within which the undergraduate degree was earned. The title is determined by the Head of Department in connection with admission. 

Any decision regarding exemption from use of the defined title is made by the Head of Department. In some individual cases, it is possible to use a title that does not correspond to the name of the faculty within which the undergraduate degree was earned.

Page manager Published: Wed 25 Aug 2021.