Managing Architectural Technical Debt

Start date 16/08/2011
End date The project is closed: 31/12/2015
The current focus of my research is on the phenomenon called Architectural Technical Debt: a financial metaphor that represents sub-optimal architectural decisions taken as debt that needs to be repaid in the future with extra-effort (interest). The metaphor has very recently been studied in the Software Engineering Scientific Community and is of high interest in industry, as described below.

Large software companies strive to decrease their delivery time in both the short and long term. It is necessary to reduce time and resources deployed by software development teams, and a good software architecture plays an important role in such context. Our research shows that sub-optimal architectural decisions, regarded as Architecture Technical Debt (ATD), lead to substantial extra-effort, regarded as the interest of the Debt. This might even include development crises where feature development is halted.

Our research project focuses on the Management of Architecture Technical Debt.
We have developed several models that help understanding the complex socio-technical phenomenon of ATD and its long-term consequences.
We are developing organizational frameworks, such as CAFFEA, and several methods and tools that can help software companies in strategically managing ATD.
Our current results, empirically evaluated, show how managing key architectural practices, setting up a suitable organization and employing methods and tools to manage ATD lead to clear benefits in the studied contexts.

Our goal is to continue improving the existing results and to develop new solutions in order to increase development speed, software quality and cost saving throughout the whole software development life-cycle.
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Research Area: Software Metrics
  • Chalmers
  • Ericsson
  • Volvo Cars
  • Volvo AB
  • Saab
  • Axis
  • Grundfos
  • Ericsson
  • Volvo Cars
  • Volvo AB
  • Saab
  • Axis
  • Grundfos

Published: Tue 14 Jul 2015. Modified: Thu 17 Mar 2016