News: Globalhttp://www.chalmers.se/sv/nyheterNews related to Chalmers University of TechnologyTue, 21 Nov 2017 19:52:12 +0100http://www.chalmers.se/sv/nyheterhttp://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/lifescience/news/Pages/A-fruitful-collaboration-between-medicine-and-engineering.aspxhttp://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/lifescience/news/Pages/A-fruitful-collaboration-between-medicine-and-engineering.aspxA fruitful collaboration between medicine and engineering<p><b>​The initiative seminar Engineering Health – The Legacy of William Chalmers on 8-9 November 2017 gathered a large number of engineers and clinicians with one strong interest in common: to bring medicine and engineering closer together.</b></p>​The programme stretched from the past, to the present and into future challenges. Many short pair-presentations provided an overview of ongoing collaborations. These featured local, as well as international, researchers who have succeeded in establishing translational activities.There were a lot of evidence shown on how academia, industry and health care jointly collaborate for mutual progress, for the benefit of patients. Round table discussions and other activities provided plenty of networking opportunities.<br /><br />The initiative seminar was a collaboration between Sahlgrenska University hospital, AstraZeneca, Chalmers, University of Gothenburg and MedTech West. The first day was held at Chalmers and the following day took place at AstraZeneca in Mölndal.<br /><br />Here is a cavalcade of photos from the seminar day at Chalmers 8 November:<br /><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Areas%20of%20Advance/Livsvetenskaper/Engineering%20Health%208%20November%202017/EngineeringHealth_171108_07_500px.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />The opening of the seminar was held by Stefan Bengtsson, President of Chalmers, and Ann-Marie Wennberg, Hospital director of Sahlgrenska. By cutting a blue and yellow double twisted Möbius ribbon lengthwise they got two halves linked together, manifesting the fruitful collaboration between the two partners. Chalmers and Sahlgrenska – a never ending story.<br /><br /><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Areas%20of%20Advance/Livsvetenskaper/Engineering%20Health%208%20November%202017/EngineeringHealth_171108_02_600px.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:500px;height:340px" /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />In a historical reenacting Philip Wramsby and Johan Randhem appeared as William Chalmers and Pehr Dubb, giving the audience a humorous insight into how it might have happened when William Chalmers left half of his fortune to a school, nowadays known as Chalmers University of Technology, and the other half to Sahlgrenska hospital. And the rest is history…<br /><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Areas%20of%20Advance/Livsvetenskaper/Engineering%20Health%208%20November%202017/EngineeringHealth_171108_08_500px.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />Kjell Torén from Sahlgrenska gave an overview of historical collaborations between Chalmers and Sahlgrenska. A traffic accident in the 1950s, where a Professor from Chalmers crashed his motorbike into a bus and got a complicated fracture, is said to have had importance for the upgrading of X-ray equipment at Sahlgrenska and also for the further collaboration in medical engineering.<br /><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Areas%20of%20Advance/Livsvetenskaper/Engineering%20Health%208%20November%202017/EngineeringHealth_171108_10_500px.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />A long-distance guest was Chris Cheng from Stanford University, who gave a talk on “Vascular Biomechanics – A collaborative Effort at Stanford” mentioning that a Chalmers alumnus, Hans Wallstén, created one of the earliest and most successful stents – the Wallstent.<br /><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Areas%20of%20Advance/Livsvetenskaper/Engineering%20Health%208%20November%202017/DSC_6876_500px.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />Stents was also the subject in the presentation given by Mårten Falkenberg, Sahlgrenska, and Håkan Nilsson, Chalmers: “Air bubble release and flow-induced forces in stent grafts”. <br />They also clearly pointed out the benefits of collaboration, listed according to their experience. Among Chalmers´ strengths are technologies, physics, mechanical as well as mathematical models, and analysis of results. Sahlgrenska, on the other hand, has expertise in life science problems, offers a clinical testbed and patient feedback, and is prominent in epidemiology.<br /><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Areas%20of%20Advance/Livsvetenskaper/Engineering%20Health%208%20November%202017/EngineeringHealth_171108_22_500px.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />Three flagships of medtech research, originating from Gothenburg, presented themselves. First in line was Max Ortiz Catalan from Chalmers, who gave a talk on “The future of bionic limbs: osseointegration and neural control”. In his research, conducted together with Rickard Brånemark, previously at Sahlgrenska but now at University of California, San Francisco, the world´s first mind-controlled arm prosthesis was developed, now regarded by the patient as a body part more than an external device. A coming research project is focused on feedback and doing the same with a leg; neuromuscular control of robotic leg prostheses.<br /><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Areas%20of%20Advance/Livsvetenskaper/Engineering%20Health%208%20November%202017/DSC_6895_500px.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />“You couldn´t do it without me!” said Sabine Reinfeldt from Chalmers and her colleague Måns Eeg-Olofsson from Sahlgrenska made the same statement: “You couldn´t do it without me!”. They jointly presented their research on “New hearing implant replacing the middle ear”, where functionally deaf patients can gain normal hearing with a Bone Conduction Implant (BCI). <br /><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Areas%20of%20Advance/Livsvetenskaper/Engineering%20Health%208%20November%202017/EngineeringHealth_171108_26_500px.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />Mikael Elam, Sahlgrenska, and Mikael Persson, Chalmers, are co-inventors of the stroke helmet Strokefinder and share many research projects in the field of traumatic brain injury and stroke. They presented “A Sahlgrenska Chalmers collaborative effort around Stroke and trauma”. <br />They also emphasized the importance of MedTech West as a network and collaborative platform for research, education, development and evaluation of new biomedical concepts and technologies. The focus is on addressing actual clinical needs in collaboration with relevant clinical staff, and to initiate, facilitate and promote increased research collaboration between the health care sector, industry and academia.<br /><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Areas%20of%20Advance/Livsvetenskaper/Engineering%20Health%208%20November%202017/DSC_6930_500px.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />Elin Rønby Pedersen is a member of Google Medical Brain Team and uses brain technology to solve problems in clinical domains. She focuses her research on the human side of deep learning in health and medicine, for example when it comes to adapting deep neural networks to read fundus images. Big data will only be helpful if you understand the context, was one of her conclusions.<br /><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Areas%20of%20Advance/Livsvetenskaper/Engineering%20Health%208%20November%202017/DSC_6937_red_500px.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />Oliver Aalami from Stanford University Hospital gave a talk on how “Apps, Augmented reality and Bio design” can be designed through collaboration between computer science and medicine. For example, smart glasses can be used by surgeons to better get an overview of monitors and screens in the operating room, without taking the eyes off the patient. <br /><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Areas%20of%20Advance/Livsvetenskaper/Engineering%20Health%208%20November%202017/EngineeringHealth_171108_04_500px.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />About 270 persons had registered for the first seminar day at Runan, Chalmers.<br /><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Areas%20of%20Advance/Livsvetenskaper/Engineering%20Health%208%20November%202017/DSC_6943_500px.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />Hanns-Ulrich Marschall, Sahlgrenska, and Paul Hockings, Chalmers, presented their collaboration in the TRISTAN project, focusing on “Imaging biomarkers for safer drugs”, especially in the field of assessment of liver toxicity. MRI-models are used to find biomarkers to better predict toxicity in humans in the development of drugs.<br /><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Areas%20of%20Advance/Livsvetenskaper/Engineering%20Health%208%20November%202017/DSC_6959_500px.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />Marta Bally, Chalmers, and Nils Lycke, Sahlgrenska, gave a talk on &quot;Lipid nanoparticles for mucosal vaccine delivery: from physicochemical properties to immune stimulation&quot;. In their research, they have identified that lipid-based nanoparticles are suitable as pharmaceutical carriers. However, the physicochemical profile of an ideal nanoparticle for mucosal vaccine delivery remains to be further investigated.<br /><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Areas%20of%20Advance/Livsvetenskaper/Engineering%20Health%208%20November%202017/DSC_6988_500px.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><span><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />A garment with integrated sensors, from the smart textiles project “WearIT” was shown by Kristina Malmgren from Sahlgrenska and Leif Sandsjö from MedTech West/University of Borås. <span style="display:inline-block"></span></span><br /><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Areas%20of%20Advance/Livsvetenskaper/Engineering%20Health%208%20November%202017/DSC_6966_500px.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /> <span><span>Kris</span></span><span><span>tina Malmgren <span style="display:inline-block"> explained</span></span></span>.<br /><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Areas%20of%20Advance/Livsvetenskaper/Engineering%20Health%208%20November%202017/DSC_6972_500px.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />Textiles that monitor your health or measure your movements was the subject also for Nils-Krister Persson, Smart Textiles Technology Lab, and Anja Lund from Chalmers in their presentation “Chalmers Textiles as enabler for Engineering Health”. Amongst other things they defined the differences between medical textiles, medtech textiles and hygiene textiles. The presentation also included information about research on compression sensitive gastro intestinal stents, where a strain-sensing thread can be integrated in the stent to sense both position and amplitude of deformations.<br /><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Areas%20of%20Advance/Livsvetenskaper/Engineering%20Health%208%20November%202017/DSC_6995_500.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />A poster session was arranged and showed even more projects where clinicians and engineers collaborate. <br /><a href="/en/areas-of-advance/lifescience/events/Engineering-Health/Pages/Abstracts.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Read the abstracts from the poster session</a><br /><br /><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Areas%20of%20Advance/Livsvetenskaper/Engineering%20Health%208%20November%202017/DSC_6883_500px.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />A number of new Sahlgrenska-Chalmers contacts were made during the coffee breaks, lunch and dinner.<br /><br /><a href="/en/areas-of-advance/lifescience/events/Engineering-Health/Pages/default.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Read more about the initiative seminar</a><br /><br /><span>​Text: Yvonne Jonsson<br />Photo: Yen Strandqvist<span style="display:inline-block"></span></span> and Yvonne Jonsson<br /><br />Tue, 21 Nov 2017 09:00:00 +0100http://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/Artificial-intelligence-and-autonomy-at-the-AHA-Festival-2017-.aspxhttp://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/Artificial-intelligence-and-autonomy-at-the-AHA-Festival-2017-.aspxArtificial intelligence and autonomy at the AHA Festival<p><b>​Creative machines, dancing robots, artificial intelligence and investigating workshops. The AHA festival at Chalmers gathers researchers, students and artists - and invites the public to investigate the borders between science and art.</b></p><p>​This year, the theme is autonomy and the festival will take place at the Student Union building at Chalmers on 20-22 November. The programme will be filled with public performances, lectures, workshops, exhibitions and seminar conversations. Permeating the festival is the driving force of curiosity and the festival aims to celebrate science as well as art.</p> <p>“It is essential to have different perspectives and competences when facing the challenges in our society. The AHA festival combines different disciplines within both science and art and offers new ways of exploring the world, aiming towards a sustainable society”, says Peter Christensson, one of two project leaders of the AHA festival. </p> <p>The idea of a border-crossing and international event emerged from a poetry evening at Chalmers, and from ongoing artistic research at the Department of Architecture. In 2014 the first AHA festival was arranged at the department and last year the Department of Physics joined the festival. This year the festival is expanding even more and presents a wide range of Chalmers research and thrilling border-crossing activities. </p> <p>“It might not be that well known, but Chalmers rests upon both a scientific and an artistic ground. This is one way of expressing that. The driving force behind all creativity is curiosity and the most essential questions are the ones that you have in mind when you leave the festival”, says Michael Eriksson, project leader of the AHA festival.<br /> <br />Text: Mia Halleröd Palmgren, <a href="mailto:mia.hallerodpalmgren@chalmers.se">mia.hallerodpalmgren@chalmers.se</a></p> <p></p> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">Five highlights at this year’s Aha-festival:</h2> <div><strong>Opera, music technology and dancing robots meet across boundaries.</strong><br />Behind Opera Mecatronics are the artists Åsa and Carl Unander-Scharin.<br /></div> <p>20 November 13:00-14:30</p> <p><strong>Can machines think independently and be creative?</strong><br />Chalmers researchers Mikael Kågebäck and Devdatt Dubhashi speak about how artificial intelligence will change our lives.<br />21 November 9:00-10:00</p> <p><strong>Recycle me! How do technology and construction together interact with our bodies? </strong><br />Organ donation and changed natural laws are in the spotlight when Chalmers doctoral student and designer Pamela Lindgren holds this workshop.<br />21 November, 12:00-14:00</p> <p><strong>How to achieve a sustainable societal development using trust.</strong><br />Listen to the Chilean architect Alejandro Aravena who will during the festival this year be receiving the Gothenburg prize for sustainable development.<br />21 November 18:00-20:00</p> <p><strong>The international dance company Spinn offers dance with and without functional variations.</strong><br />In the performance Imagine these dancers will test how far we can go to feel alive. How can we be independent, together? Who will get to take place on stage and share his or her story? <br />22 November 19:00-20:30<br /></p> <p>Se the full programme at <a href="http://ahafestival.se/">ahafestival.se<br /></a></p> <p></p> <h4 class="chalmersElement-H4">About the festival</h4> <p>The AHA festival will take place in Gothenburg on 20-22 November. Welcome to the Student Union building, second floor, at Chalmers campus Johanneberg. The address is Chalmersplatsen 1. <strong>The festival will be free of charge and open to the public. </strong>Join us and be curious!</p> <p><a href="/en/departments/ace/calendar/Pages/AHA-Festival-2017.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Add the event to your calendar</a><a href="https://www.facebook.com/ahafestivalse"><br /><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Follow the AHA Festival on Facebook</a></p> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Press contacts:  </strong></div> <div><a href="/en/Staff/Pages/peter.aspx">Peter Christensson</a>, Project Leader, AHA Festival: +46 (0)70 958 90 43, <a href="mailto:peter@chalmers.se">peter@chalmers.se</a></div> <div><a href="/en/Staff/Pages/michael-eriksson.aspx">Michael Eriksson</a>, Project Leader, <span>AHA Festival<span style="display:inline-block"></span></span>:  +46 (0)70 583 51 85, <a href="mailto:michael.eriksson@chalmers.se">michael.eriksson@chalmers.se</a> <br /></div>Thu, 16 Nov 2017 14:00:00 +0100http://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/ict/news/Pages/Additional-billion-Swedish-kronor-to-AI-research-in-WASP.aspxhttp://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/ict/news/Pages/Additional-billion-Swedish-kronor-to-AI-research-in-WASP.aspxBillion kronor programme for Swedish AI research<p><b>​The Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation has granted an additional billion Swedish kronor to extend the Wallenberg Autonomous Systems and Software Program (WASP), with a broad investment into artificial intelligence.</b></p>​ <br />The initiative in artificial intelligence will follow two pathways. The larger of these involves an investment into machine learning, deep learning and the next generation of AI. This has been termed “eXplainable AI” and involves asking the system how it reached a particular answer, whereby the system can justify its answers and use them in a general situation. The second pathway deals with increasing our understanding of the mathematical principles behind AI.<br /><br />Each of the two branches has resources to recruit 14 senior researchers and 40 research students, where the research students will become members of graduate schools and take specialist courses in relevant fields. The two new graduate schools will coordinate with the graduate school that has already been established within the framework of WASP, where just over 100 research students are currently studying. Both the senior researchers and the research students will be recruited at the universities that are participating in WASP, primarily Chalmers University of Technology, the Royal Institute of Technology, Linköping University and Lund University. Further Swedish universities, however, may also benefit from the research grant.<br /><br /><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Areas%20of%20Advance/Information%20and%20Communication%20Technology/News%20events/DavidSands_170x220px.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="David Sands" style="margin:5px" />&quot;This expansion of WASP is a fantastic opportunity for Chalmers and Sweden to build on our existing strengths in AI, but also recruit and train the next generation of AI experts,&quot; says David Sands, Chalmers representative in the WASP Program Management Group.<br /><br /><br />The grant also provides SEK 70 million to reinforce computing infrastructure.<br /><br />“This is a unique investment, even in an international perspective. WASP will in this way obtain the resources needed to create the knowledge platform that Sweden requires if it is to continue to hold its position at the forefront of research and remain competitive,” says Mille Millnert, chair of the WASP board.<br /><br />With this extension, WASP will have a budget of SEK 3 billion between now and 2026. At least 250 research students will be educated, at least 75 of them being industry-based research students. This is a powerful investment with connections to many different parts within artificial intelligence, software development and principles of autonomy. The new grant will also enable the recruitment of 46 senior researchers, the construction of demonstrators (arenas in which the research and commercial worlds can meet in concrete projects), investment into computer infrastructure, guest researcher programmes, and international collaboration.<br /><br />For more information about WASP at Chalmers, contact:<br />David Sands, Professor of Information Security, <a href="mailto:dave@chalmers.se">dave@chalmers.se</a><br />Mats Viberg, First Vice President with responsibility for research, <a href="mailto:mats.viberg@chalmers.se">mats.viberg@chalmers.se<br /></a><br /><a href="https://liu.se/en/news-item/miljardsatsning-pa-svensk-ai-forskning">Read the full press release from Linköping University &gt;</a>Thu, 16 Nov 2017 11:00:00 +0100http://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/chem/news/Pages/corrosion-chemist.aspxhttp://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/chem/news/Pages/corrosion-chemist.aspxPrestigious awards to Chalmers corrosion chemist<p><b>​Mohsen Esmaily, researcher at the Inorganic Environmental Chemistry Division has recently received two prestigious awards from the Electrochemical Society and Acta Materialia Inc for cutting-edge research in the field of materials and corrosion science.</b></p><p><a href="/en/Staff/Pages/mohsen-esmaily.aspx">​​Mohsen Esmaily</a> is currently employed as postdoctoral research fellow at the Department of Chemistry and Chemical engineering, Division of Energy and Materials at Chalmers University of Technology. He completed his Ph.D. at the same university in Feb. 2016 “The role of Microstructure in the Atmospheric Corrosion of selected Light Alloys and Composites”. The thesis includes 16 peer reviewed journal papers. For the ground breaking results achieved in this thesis he is now given the two prestigious awards. </p> <p>​Mohsen Esmaily showed in his thesis and also later work ways to create much more corrosion resistant magnesium alloys than this far has been possible. This may open up the field for new lightweight magnesium constructions, and thus may in the long run lead to a reduction of harmful emissions.   </p> <blockquote dir="ltr" style="font-size:14px;margin-right:0px"><p style="font-size:14px"><span style="font-size:14px">“To make the world a better place is my biggest goal, but along the way I need some support and appreciation so it was really rewarding for me to see that my work was appreciated by the community. I am thinking about all the days, nights, weekends, summers and holidays when I was in the office and in the lab instead of being with my family, with my son. I was happy when I got the awards because I knew that I have made a great contribution. I now feel even more motivated than before to do high quality research, but I also need to have more balance in my life”, says Mohsen Esmaily.</span></p></blockquote> <p>Recently he also, together with leading corrosion scientists from Spain, Germany, Australia, and USA coauthored a 100 pages comprehensive review summarizing decades of Mg corrosion research as well as some new unpublished data. It was published August 2017 in the highly ranked journal <em>Progress in Materials Science</em> with reviewers comments such as “the best review I’ve ever seen in the field of corrosion”, “superior to the majority of previous Mg review articles”, and “a tremendous contribution to the field of Mg corrosion”. The paper is now listed as the second most downloaded review in the journal.</p> <blockquote dir="ltr" style="margin-right:0px"><p><span style="font-size:14px">“I was managing the team and we had a (very) tight deadline. That was also a lot of hard work, but I would really suggest such work to other people at my level because at the end of this review I saw the bigger picture of our research, I found many interesting unknowns, and could select much better questions in the field of materials science to answer in the future. Also, I had the chance to interact with many prominent scientist”, says Mohsen Esmaily. </span></p></blockquote> <p>Previously, Mohsen Esmaily’s achievements in the field of light alloys corrosion have been recognized and rewarded by the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences, and the Wallenberg Foundation. </p> <p><br />Read more about Mohsen Esmaily’s awards and research on the links below.<br /><a href="/en/departments/chem/news/Pages/Breakthrough-for-magnesium-lightweight-materials.aspx">Breakthrough for magnesium lightweight materials </a><br /><a href="http://www.electrochem.org/redcat-blog/2017-corrosion-division-morris-cohen-graduate-student-award-goes-moshen-esmaily/">2017 Corrosion Division Morris Cohen Graduate Student Award Goes to Moshen Esmaily!</a><br /><a href="https://www.journals.elsevier.com/acta-materialia/news/recipients-of-the-2016-acta-student-awards">Recipients of the 2016 Acta Student Awards</a></p> <p> </p> <p><img class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/KB/Generell/Nyheter/Mohsen%20Esmaily%20text.png" width="250" height="175" alt="" style="margin:5px" /></p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p>Image: ASM Award Ceremony- From left: Dr. William E. Frazier  (American Society of Metals (ASM) president), Mohsen Esmaily (Chalmers), and Prof. Christopher Schuh (The Head of Materials Science Department at MIT) <br /><br /></p> <p>  </p>Thu, 16 Nov 2017 00:00:00 +0100http://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/Engineering-of-a-Swedish-quantum-computer-set-to-start.aspxhttp://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/Engineering-of-a-Swedish-quantum-computer-set-to-start.aspxEngineering of a Swedish quantum computer set to start<p><b>​A SEK 1 billion research initiative is setting Sweden on course to a global top position in quantum technology. The focus is on developing a quantum computer with much greater computing power than the best supercomputers of today. The initiative, which is headed up by Professor Per Delsing at Chalmers University of Technology, has been made possible by an anniversary donation of SEK 600 million from the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation.</b></p><div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/MC2/News/kaw_qubit_171101_665x330.jpg" alt="" style="margin:5px" /> </div> <div> </div> <div><em>The Swedish quantum computer is built of superconducting qubits, electrical circuits on a microchip that can host quantum states of single photons. Linking many qubits is relatively easy, but having control of quantum states and errors is difficult. Photo: Johan Bodell/Chalmers</em></div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div>The progress of research in quantum technology in recent years has brought the world to the brink of a new technology revolution – the second quantum revolution. Researchers have learnt to control individual quantum systems such as individual atoms, electrons and particles of light, which is opening the door to completely new possibilities. Extremely rapid computers, intercept-proof communications and hyper-sensitive measurement methods are in sight.</div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div>A major Swedish initiative – the Wallenberg Centre for Quantum Technology – is now being launched under the leadership of Chalmers University of Technology to contribute to, and implement the second quantum revolution. Some 40 researchers are to be recruited under the decade-long research programme which begins in January 2018. In addition to the donation from the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation further funds are coming from industry, Chalmers University of Technology and other universities, resulting in a total budget of close to SEK 1 billion.</div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/MC2/News/kaw_pdelsing_171113_300px.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" width="188" height="282" alt="" style="margin:5px" />The programme’s focus project centres on the engineering of a quantum computer based on superconducting circuits. The smallest building block of the quantum computer – the qubit – is based on principles which are entirely different from those of today’s computers, thus enabling the quantum computer to process vast quantities of data using relatively few qubits.</div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div>“Our goal is to have a functioning quantum computer with at least a hundred qubits. Such a computer has far greater computing power than the best supercomputers of today and can be used, for example, to solve optimisation problems, advanced machine learning, and heavy calculations of the properties of molecules,” says Per Delsing (to the right), Professor of Quantum Device Physics at Chalmers University of Technology and the initiative’s programme director.</div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div>There is a great deal of interest in quantum technology throughout the world. Major investments are being made in the USA, Canada, Japan and China and the EU is launching a Quantum Technology Flagship in 2019. Companies such as Google and IBM are also investing in quantum computers and, like Chalmers, have chosen to base them on superconducting circuits. Policy-makers and business managers are starting to realise that quantum technology has the potential to change our society significantly, through improved artificial intelligence, secure encryption and more efficient design of medicines and materials.</div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div>“If Sweden is to continue to be a leading nation we need to be at the forefront in these fields. By focusing on the long-term expansion of expertise and by attracting the best young researchers we can put Sweden on the quantum technology map in the long term. There are no shortcuts. By investing in basic research we can ensure that the necessary infrastructure is in place so that over time other players and companies can take over and develop applications and new technologies,” says Peter Wallenberg Jr, chairman of the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation.</div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div>In addition to the focus project the research programme includes a national excellence initiative with the aim of carrying out research and building up expertise in the four sub-areas of quantum technology: quantum computers, quantum simulators, quantum communication and quantum sensors. Chalmers University of Technology is coordinating the first two sub-areas. The expansion of expertise in quantum communication is headed up by Professor Gunnar Björk at KTH Royal Institute of Technology, and Professor Stefan Kröll at Lund University is coordinating the quantum sensor field.</div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div>Chalmers researchers have been working on superconducting qubits for almost 20 years and have made many contributions to enhance knowledge in the field, including publications in Nature and Science. They were among the first in the world to create a superconducting qubit, and have explored a completely new area of physics through wide-ranging experiments on individual qubits. </div> <div> </div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/MC2/News/kaw_kvantgruppen_171101_665x330.jpg" alt="" style="margin:5px" /> </div> <div> </div> <div><em>Göran Wendin, Per Delsing, Göran Johansson and Jonas Bylander are the four researchers at Chalmers University of Technology who, thanks to the donation from the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, will now bring forward Sweden's first quantum computer. This is happening in the context of the newly established Wallenberg Centre for Quantum Technology. In addition there are two more principal investigators; Gunnar Björk at KTH Royal Institute of Technology will coordinate research in quantum communication, and Stefan Kröll at Lund University will focus on quantum sensing. Photo: Johan Bodell/Chalmers</em></div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div>“I am pleased that our quantum physics researchers, along with colleagues in the rest of Sweden, will have this opportunity to focus on a specific and important goal in a way that all of Sweden can benefit from the knowledge acquired. I would also like to extend my warmest thanks to the Wallenberg Foundation for its deep commitment and long-term support,” says Stefan Bengtsson, President and CEO of Chalmers. </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div>In parallel with this, the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation is investing SEK 1 billion in artificial intelligence, channelled through the Wallenberg Autonomous Systems and Software Program (WASP), which was launched in 2015. </div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Details of the investment can be found in the press release from Linköping University &gt;&gt;&gt;</strong><br /></div> <div><a href="https://liu.se/en/news-item/miljardsatsning-pa-svensk-ai-forskning">LiU to lead billion-SEK investment in autonomous systems</a><br /> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div><strong>Read more about the link between the two anniversary donations in KAW’s press release &gt;&gt;&gt;</strong><br /><a href="https://kaw.wallenberg.org/en/press/donation-to-ai-and-quantum-technology-research">SEK 1.6 billion on artificial intelligence and quantum technology</a></div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <h5 class="chalmersElement-H5">FACTS</h5> <div> </div> <h5 class="chalmersElement-H5">WALLENBERG CENTRE FOR QUANTUM TECHNOLOGY</h5> <div> </div> <div>- Wallenberg Centre for Quantum Technology is a ten-year SEK 1 billion initiative aimed at bringing Swedish research and industry to the front of the second quantum revolution.</div> <div> </div> <div>- The research programme aims to develop and secure Swedish competence in all areas of quantum technology: quantum computing, quantum simulation, quantum communications and quantum sensing.</div> <div> </div> <div>- The research programme includes a focus project aimed at developing a quantum computer and an excellence programme covering the four areas of quantum technology.</div> <div> </div> <div>- Wallenberg Centre for Quantum Technology is led by, and is largely located at Chalmers University of Technology. The areas of quantum communication and quantum sensors are coordinated by KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Lund University.</div> <div> </div> <div>- The initiative includes a graduate research school, a postdoctoral program, a guest researcher programme and funds for recruiting young researchers. It will ensure Swedish long-term expertise in quantum technology, even after the end of the programme.</div> <div> </div> <div>- Collaboration with several industry partners ensures that the areas of application become relevant to Swedish industry.</div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div><strong>Read more in the programme fact sheet &gt;&gt;&gt;</strong> </div> <div> </div> <div><a href="/en/news/Documents/programme_description_WCQT_171114_eng.pdf">Wallenberg Centre for Quantum Technology</a> (pdf, 600 kB) </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <h5 class="chalmersElement-H5">FACTS</h5> <h5 class="chalmersElement-H5"> </h5> <h5 class="chalmersElement-H5">THE SECOND QUANTUM REVOLUTION</h5> <div> </div> <div>In the 20th century, the first quantum revolution took place. It gave us inventions like the laser and transistor – inventions that underlie the entire information technology that forms today's society.</div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div>After many years of basic research on strange quantum phenomena such as superposition, entanglement and squeezed states, scientists have learned to control individual quantum systems as individual atoms, electrons and photons. The world record currently stands at 20 qubits, but rapid progress is being made each month. Applications such as extremely fast quantum devices, intercept-proof communications and hyper-sensitive measuring methods are in sight.</div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div>Therefore, heavy investments in quantum technology are being made throughout the world. The EU launches a ten-year venture of one billion euros in 2019. Even larger programmes exist in North America, Asia and Australia. IT companies like Google, IBM, Intel and Microsoft are also making significant investments. Safe and fast communication is a strong driving force for quantum technology. Already today there are commercial systems that can transmit quantum encryption keys through an unbroken optical fibre over 100 kilometres, although at a relatively low speed.</div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div>An imminent milestone that scientists are struggling to achieve is to demonstrate quantum supremacy, which means solving a problem beyond reach even for the most powerful future classic computer. This requires at least 50 qubits. This will be done by means of a quantum simulator, a simpler form of quantum computer. Useful applications of quantum simulation are expected within five years. Realizing a functioning programmable quantum computer will take significantly longer.</div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div>Mankind’s knowledge about the world and our technical advances are limited by what we can measure, and how accurately. Researchers are also learning to use individual particles, such as photons and electrons, as sensors in measurements of force, gravity, electrical fields, etc. With quantum technology, the measuring power is pushed far beyond what was previously possible.</div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div>See and hear the researchers tell their story in a video on Youtube &gt;&gt;&gt;<br /></div> <div><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kcTGzE_AtBc">The Quantum Revolution</a></div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div><strong>Read more about central quantum phenomena in the fact sheet &gt;&gt;&gt;</strong> </div> <div> </div> <div><a href="/en/news/Documents/quantum_technology_popdescr_171114_eng.pdf">Quantum technology</a> (pdf, 200 kB)  </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div><strong>Contacts:</strong></div> <div> </div> <div>Per Delsing, Professor of Quantum Device Physics at Chalmers University of Technology, +46-31-772 3317, per.delsing@chalmers.se</div> <div> </div> <div>Göran Johansson, Professor of Applied Quantum Physics at Chalmers University of Technology, +46-31-772 3237, goran.l.johansson@chalmers.se</div> <div> </div>Wed, 15 Nov 2017 08:30:00 +0100http://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/m2/news/Pages/Chalmers-new-project-will-bring-autonomous-and-eco-friendly-public-transportation-into-cities.aspxhttp://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/m2/news/Pages/Chalmers-new-project-will-bring-autonomous-and-eco-friendly-public-transportation-into-cities.aspxBringing autonomous and eco-friendly public transportation into cities<p><b>Sohjoa Baltic is a EU-funded project that aims to facilitate the transition to autonomous and eco-friendly public transport in the cities around the Baltic Sea. The project involves 13 partners across 8 countries. Chalmers will, among other things, contribute with knowledge of vehicle engineering, autonomous technical development, intelligent cooperative driving behavior and risk analysis.</b></p>​<span style="background-color:initial">The project works towards increasing the attractiveness of public transport service and introducing automated driverless electric minibusses, especially for the first and last mile of the journey. It proposes recommendations for eco-friendly and smart automated public transport and guidelines on the organizational set-up. The goal is to achieve profound changes where city residents choose public transport in front of their own car.</span><div><br /></div> <div>Chalmers contributes with its expertise in safety and operational requirements and will conduct research related to service quality, development of new technology for autonomous vehicles, driving behavior, weather impacts, disability adjustment and risk analysis. Responsible for Chalmers part of the project is <a href="https://www.chalmers.se/en/Staff/Pages/mauro-bellone.aspx">Mauro Bellone</a>, researcher working with the Adaptive Systems group at the Department of Mechanics and Maritime Sciences.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Sohjoa Baltic is led by Metropolia University of Applied Sciences in Finland. The project is financed by the EU and has received about 4 million euros.</div> <div>​<br /></div> <div></div> <div><br /></div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/M2/csm_IBSR_logo_EUflag_1000px_001a756769.jpg" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:645px;height:177px" /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /></div> Tue, 07 Nov 2017 10:00:00 +0100http://www.chalmers.se/en/researchinfrastructure/oso/news/Pages/Alma-image-of-red-giant-star-gives-a-surprising-glimpse-of-the-Suns-future.aspxhttp://www.chalmers.se/en/researchinfrastructure/oso/news/Pages/Alma-image-of-red-giant-star-gives-a-surprising-glimpse-of-the-Suns-future.aspxAlma’s image of red giant star gives a surprising glimpse of the Sun’s future<p><b>​A Chalmers-led team of astronomers has for the first time observed details on the surface of an aging star with the same mass as the Sun. ALMA:s images show that the star is a giant, its diameter twice the size of Earth’s orbit around the Sun, but also that the star’s atmosphere is affected by powerful, unexpected shock waves. The research is published in Nature Astronomy on 30 October 2017.</b></p>​<span style="background-color:initial">A team of astronomers led by Wouter Vlemmings, Chalmers University of Technology, have used the telescope Alma (Atacama Large Millimetre/Submillimetre Array) to make the sharpest observations yet of a star with the same starting mass as the Sun. The new images show for the first time details on the surface of the red giant W Hydrae, 320 light years distant in the constellation of Hydra, the Water Snake.</span><div><br /></div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/SEE/Nyheter/WHya_colour_solarsystem_72dpi_340x340.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" />W Hydrae is an example of an AGB (asymptotic giant branch) star. Such stars are cool, bright, old and lose mass via stellar winds. The name derives from their position on the famous Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, which classifies stars according to their brightness and temperature.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>– For us it’s important to study not just what red giants look like, but how they change and how they seed the galaxy with the elements that are the ingredients of life. Using the antennas of Alma in their highest-resolution configuration we can now make the most detailed observations ever of these cool and exciting stars, says Wouter Vlemmings.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Stars like the Sun evolve over timescales of many billion years. When they reach old age, they puff up and become bigger, cooler and more prone to lose mass in the form of stellar winds. Stars manufacture important elements like carbon and nitrogen. When they reach the red giant stage, these elements are released into space, ready to be used in subsequent generations of new stars.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/SEE/Nyheter/WHya_dss_72dpi_340x340.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" />Alma's images provide the clearest view yet of the surface of a red giant with a similar mass to the Sun. Earlier sharp images have shown details on much more massive, red supergiant stars like Betelgeuse and Antares. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>The observations have also surprised the scientists. The presence of an unexpectedly compact and bright spot provides evidence that the star has surprisingly hot gas in a layer above the star’s surface: a chromosphere. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>– Our measurements of the bright spot suggest there are powerful shock waves in the star’s atmosphere that reach higher temperatures than are predicted by current theoretical models for AGB stars, says Theo Khouri, astronomer at Chalmers and member of the team.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/SEE/Nyheter/star_size_comparisons_72dpi_340x148.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" />An alternative possibility is at least as surprising: that the star was undergoing a giant flare when the observations were made.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>The scientists are now carrying out new observations, both with Alma and other instruments, to better understand W Hydrae’s surprising atmosphere. Observations like these with Alma’s highest-resolution configuration are challenging, but also rewarding, explains team member Elvire De Beck, also astronomer at Chalmers.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/SEE/Nyheter/alma_dok-1114-cc_72dpi_340x340.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" />– It’s humbling to look at our image of W Hydrae and see its size compared to the orbit of the Earth. We are born from material created in stars like this, so for us it’s exciting to have the challenge of understanding something which so tells us both about our origins and our future, she says.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><em><strong>Images</strong></em></div> <div><br /></div> <div><i>High-resolution images (with labels in English and Swedish) are available for download from Flickr: <br /><span></span></i><span></span><span style="background-color:initial"><i><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/onsala/sets/72157690289421556">https://www.flickr.com/photos/onsala/sets/72157690289421556</a></i></span><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><em>1. (top) The sharpest image yet of a red giant star: 320 light years from Earth, the star W Hydrae is a few billion years further on than the Sun in its life. For comparison, the dotted ring shows the size of the Earth’s orbit around the Sun, seen from an angle. Alma is sensitive to submillimetre wavelengths; this image is taken at around 0,9 mm. (Credit: Alma (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO)/W. Vlemmings)</em></div> <div><br /></div> <div><em>2. The sharpest image yet of a red giant star: 320 light years from Earth, the star W Hydrae is a few billion years further on than the Sun in its life. The dotted rings show the size of the orbits of the Earth (in blue) and other planets around the Sun for comparison. The system is seen at an angle. </em><em style="background-color:initial">Alma is sensitive to submillimetre wavelengths; this image is taken at around 0,9 mm. </em><em style="background-color:initial">(Credit: Alma (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO)/W. Vlemmings)</em></div> <div><br /></div> <div><em>3. The sky around W Hydrae, as seen in visible light. (Credit: Digitized Sky Survey)</em></div> <div><br /></div> <div><em>4. Direct imaging of even the biggest and closest stars, is a challenge for astronomers. In this graphic, the Alma image of W Hydrae is compared with the best images so far of other stars: the red giant R Doradus, the red supergiants Antares and Betelgeuse. A variety of imaging techniques and different wavelengths of light have been used to create these images; giant stars can have very different sizes seen in different wavelengths. The angular sizes of the stars in Alpha Centauri, the closest star system, and the dwarf planet Pluto (at its closest to Earth) are shown for comparison. (Images: ESO/K. Ohnaka (Antares); Alma (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO)/E. O’Gorman/P. Kervella (Betelgeuse); ESO (R Doradus); Alma (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO)/W. Vlemmings (W Hydrae))</em></div> <div><br /></div> <div><em>5. Alma is the most powerful ground-based telescope for observing the cool universe — molecular gas and dust as well as the distant Universe. Situated in the Atacama desert Alma is addressing some of the deepest questions of humanity: those of our cosmic origins, including the building blocks of stars, planets, galaxies, and life itself. </em></div> <div><em>High-resolution version: https://www.eso.org/public/images/dok-1114-cc/</em></div> <div><em>Credit: D. Kordan/ESO</em></div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>More about the research</strong></div> <div><br /></div> <div>The results are presented in the paper<em> The shock-heated atmosphere of an asymptotic giant branch star resolved by ALMA</em>, published online in Nature Astronomy on 30 October 2017 (link to journal article: <a href="http://rdcu.be/xUWV" style="outline:0px none">http://rdcu.be/xUWV</a>). The paper is also available at <a href="https://arxiv.org/abs/1711.01153">https://arxiv.org/abs/1711.01153​</a>.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>The team is composed of Wouter Vlemmings (Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden), Theo Khouri (Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden), Eamon O’Gorman (Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, Ireland), Elvire De Beck (Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden), Elizabeth Humphreys (ESO), Boy Lankhaar (Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden), Matthias Maercker (Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden), Hans Olofsson (Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden), Sofia Ramstedt (Uppsala University, Sweden), Daniel Tafoya (Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden) and Aki Takigawa (Kyoto University, Japan).</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>More about Alma and Onsala Space Observatory</strong></div> <div> </div> <div>The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (Alma), an international astronomy facility, is a partnership of ESO, the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Institutes of Natural Sciences (NINS) of Japan in cooperation with the Republic of Chile. Alma is funded by ESO on behalf of its Member States, by NSF in cooperation with the National Research Council of Canada (NRC) and the National Science Council of Taiwan (NSC) and by NINS in cooperation with the Academia Sinica (AS) in Taiwan and the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI).</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Chalmers University of Technology and Onsala Space Observatory have been involved in Alma since its inception; receivers for the telescope are one of many contributions. Onsala Space Observatory is host to the Nordic Alma Regional Centre, which provides technical expertise to the Alma project and supports astronomers in the Nordic countries in using Alma.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Onsala Space Observatory is Sweden's national facility for radio astronomy. The observatory provides researchers with equipment for the study of the earth and the rest of the universe. In Onsala, 45 km south of Gothenburg, it operates two radio telescopes and a station in the international telescope Lofar. It also participates in several international projects. The observatory is hosted by Department of Earth and Space Sciences at Chalmers University of Technology, and is operated on behalf of the Swedish Research Council.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Contacts:</strong></div> <div> </div> <div>Robert Cumming, astronomer and communications officer, Onsala Space Observatory, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, +46 31-772 5500, +46 70-493 31 14, robert.cumming@chalmers.se</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Wouter Vlemmings, professor in radio astronomy, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, +46 31 772 5509, +46 733 544 667, wouter.vlemmings@chalmers.se</div> <div><br /></div> Tue, 07 Nov 2017 08:00:00 +0100http://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/ims/news/Pages/Enhancing-eco-efficiency-through-digitalisation-of-the-maritime-industry-in-the-Baltic-Sea-region.aspxhttp://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/ims/news/Pages/Enhancing-eco-efficiency-through-digitalisation-of-the-maritime-industry-in-the-Baltic-Sea-region.aspxEco-efficiency through digitalisation of the maritime industry<p><b>​ECOPRODIGI is a newly launched EU-funded research project addressing eco-efficiency through digitalisation of the maritime sector in the Baltic Sea region. The project includes 27 partners across 8 countries. Chalmers contribution is digital technology applications.</b></p>​<span style="background-color:initial">ECOPRODIGI is an ambitious 3-year project with 27 partners across 8 countries. Chalmers has received EU-funding to take part in this project, addressing eco-efficiency through digitalisation of the maritime sector in the Baltic Sea region. ECOPRODIGI project kick-starts a unique collaboration between research organisations and the industry end-users to create and pilot digital solutions increasing eco-efficiency throughout the vessel life cycle. Ultimately, the project supports the Baltic Sea region in becoming a front-runner in maritime industry digitalisation and clean shipping.</span><div><br /></div> <div>ECOPRODIGI focuses on creating and piloting digital solutions for vessel performance monitoring, cargo stowage optimization as well as shipyard process optimization. In addition to the digital solutions, the project will produce a roadmap for maritime sector digitalisation and policy recommendations. The project will also design and deliver training programmes for shipyard ecosystems and organize public events to deepen the networks within the maritime sector.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Chalmers University of Technology is responsible for investigating and piloting digital technology applications, such as 3D-scanning, to enhance the eco-efficiency of shipyard processes (ship building, repair, maintenance, and retrofit).</div> <div><br /></div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/IMS/Produktionssystem/Ecoprodigi-kickoff-710x250.png" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><br /><em>Participants of the ECOPRODIGI project kickoff in Turku, Finland.</em><br /><br /></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">ECOPRODIGI is led by the </span><a href="http://www.utu.fi/en/Pages/home.aspx">University of Turku</a><span style="background-color:initial"> (Finland), The project has received more than €3 million from the Interreg Baltic Sea Region Programme. With the partners’ own contributions, the overall project budget is €4.2 million. </span><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div>The project’s results, news and open events are communicated on our website <a href="http://www.ecoprodigi.eu/" target="_blank">www.ecoprodigi.eu​</a> and on Twitter @ECOPRODIGI_BSR. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>For more information: <a href="/en/projects/Pages/Ecoprodigi-QEco-efficiency-to-maritime-industry-processes-in-the.aspx">Chalmers ECOPRODIGI project page</a></div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Contact</strong></div> <div>Björn Johansson</div> <div>bjorn.johansson@chalmers.se</div> <div>+46 31 772 38 09 </div> <div><br /></div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/IMS/Produktionssystem/Ecoprodigi-logga-1_750x210.png" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><br /></div>Thu, 02 Nov 2017 17:00:00 +0100http://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/mc2/news/Pages/Graphene-enables-high-speed-electronics-on-flexible-materials.aspxhttp://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/mc2/news/Pages/Graphene-enables-high-speed-electronics-on-flexible-materials.aspxGraphene enables high-speed electronics on flexible materials<p><b>​A flexible detector for terahertz frequencies has been developed by Chalmers researchers using graphene transistors on plastic substrates. It is the first of its kind, and can extend the use of terahertz technology to applications that will require flexible electronics, such as wireless sensor networks and wearable technology. The results are published in the scientific journal Applied Physics Letters.</b></p>Terahertz radiation has a wide range of uses and can occur in everything from radio astronomy to medicine. The term refers to the electromagnetic waves whose frequencies range from 100 gigahertz to 10 terahertz. Demand for higher bandwidth in wireless communications and depiction for security applications has led to intensified research on systems and components intended for terahertz frequencies.<br /><br />One challenge has long been to enable low weight and cheap applications. However, advances in polymer technology have promoted the development of flexible electronics and enabled the production of high frequency units on flexible substrates.<br /><br />Now, Chalmers researchers Xinxin Yang, Andrei Vorobiev, Andrey Generalov, Michael A. Andersson and Jan Stake have developed the first mechanically flexible and graphene-based terahertz detector in its kind. Thus, paving the way for flexible terahertz electronics.<br /><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/MC2/News/thz_detektor_171017_adj.jpg" width="629" height="435" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><br /><span class="FeaturedImageText"><em>​</em><span><em>With the help of the two-dimensional material graphene, the first flexible terahertz detector has been developed by researchers at Chalmers. Illustration: Boid – Product Design Studio, Gothenburg.</em><br /></span></span><br />The detector has unique features. At room temperature, it detects signals in the frequency range 330 to 500 gigahertz. It is translucent and flexible, and opens to a variety of applications. The technique can be used for imaging in the terahertz area (THz camera), but also for identifying different substances (sensor). It may also be of potential benefit in health care, where terahertz waves can be used to detect cancer. Other areas where the detector could be used are imaging sensors for vehicles or for wireless communications.<br /><br />The unique electronic features of graphene, combined with its flexible nature, make it a promising material to integrate into plastic and fabric, something that will be important building blocks in a future interconnected world. Graphene electronics enables new applications for, among other things, everyday objects, which are commonly referred to as the Internet of Things.<br /><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/MC2/News/detektor_forskarbilder_171030.JPG" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><br /><em>The research group behind the flexible terahertz detector, from the left </em><span><em>Jan Stake, Xinxin Yang, Andrei Vorobiev, Andrey Generalov and Michael A. Andersson. Photo: Anna-Lena Lundqvist</em><span style="display:inline-block"></span></span><br /><br />The detector shows the concrete possibilities of graphene, a material that conduct electric current extremely well. It is a feature that makes graphene an attractive building block in fast electronics. The Chalmers researchers' work is therefore an important step forward for graphene in the terahertz area, and a breakthrough for high performance and cheap flexible terahertz technology.<br /><br />The detector drew attention at the EU Tallinn Digital Summit recently, where several important technological innovations made possible by graphene and related materials were on display. At the summit, EU Heads of State and Government gathered to discuss digital innovation and Europe's digital future. The flagship focus was to show what role graphene can play.<br /><br />The research is also part of Xinxin Yang's licentiate seminar, which will be presented at Chalmers on 22 November 2017.<br /><br />The research on the terahertz detector has been funded by the EU Graphene Flagship, the Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research (SSF), and the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation (KAW).<br /><br />Text: Michael Nystås<br />Illustration: Boid – Product Design Studio, Gothenburg<br />Photographs of Jan Stake, Xinxin Yang, Andrei Vorobiev, Andrey Generalov and Michael A. Andersson: Anna-Lena Lundqvist<br /><br /><strong>Read the article &quot;A flexible graphene terahertz detector&quot; in the journal Applied Physics Letters</strong> &gt;&gt;&gt;<br /><a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4993434">dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4993434</a><br />Tue, 31 Oct 2017 09:30:00 +0100http://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/mc2/news/Pages/Best-Student-Paper-Award-to-Ewa-Simpanen-at-international-photonics-conference.aspxhttp://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/mc2/news/Pages/Best-Student-Paper-Award-to-Ewa-Simpanen-at-international-photonics-conference.aspxBest Student Paper Award to Ewa Simpanen at international photonics conference<p><b>​Ewa Simpanen, PhD student at the Photonics Laboratory at MC2, has been awarded with second prize for best student paper at the IEEE Photonics Conference 2017 in Orlando, Florida – in tough competition with 350 other contributions. &quot;That I received the prize indicates that my research is contemporary, relevant and quality-oriented, which is fun feedback,&quot; she says.</b></p><div>Ewa Simpanen has just returned from the United States, and we got the chance to exchange some words with her. Here she also gives her best tips for writing a praised paper.</div> <div>Her paper, &quot;1060 nm single and multimode VCSELs for up to 50 Gb/s modulation&quot;, was honoured with a prize sum of 500 USD. An excellent way to pay attention to student contributions at major conferences, as they otherwise easily end up in the dark, Ewa thinks.</div> <div>&quot;That I received the prize indicates that my research is contemporary, relevant and quality-oriented, which is fun feedback,&quot; she says. <br /></div> <h5 class="chalmersElement-H5">What was your paper about?</h5> <div>&quot;We present a VCSEL (vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser) especially designed for data transmission in data centres where the fibre needs to be 1-2 kilometres long. It is a GaAs (gallium arsenide) VCSEL which is single-mode with a wavelength of 1060 nanometre. We show that our design can handle up to 50 Gb/s over a very short distance and 25 Gb/s data transmission over 1 km MMF. We also make a brief comparison of this VCSEL against a slightly larger, multi-mode VCSEL,&quot; explains Ewa.</div> <div> </div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/MC2/News/esimpanen_award_IMG_1178_400px.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" height="395" width="297" alt="" style="margin:5px" />She received the encouraging award in competition with 350 other contributions. The road to the price was long, and one can describe the process as getting through a needle eye.</div> <div>&quot;A month before the conference started, I received an email that I was chosen as one of five finalists who remained in the first prize competition. We would all prepare a presentation and be ready to present our work in front of a jury – four people who were the conference's &quot;chairs&quot;. It was fun to present the contribution but the questions that followed were tough to respond to under pressure. It was also exciting to have an opportunity to talk more with the other finalists and learn more about their research, although the applications we wrote about in our papers were very different,&quot; explains Ewa.</div> <div> </div> <div>Her best tips for those who want to write a successful paper are to start with having a relevant question to explore and to write with it as a starting point.</div> <div>&quot;Do not include anything that does not feel directly relevant and rather cut too much than too little. Also think about whether the introduction really describes the background and the opportunities you see with your core question, and if the measurements and results you have chosen are the best to show what you want to get,&quot; Ewa says.</div> <div> </div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/MC2/News/esimpanen_award_IMG_1164_400px.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" height="240" width="320" alt="" style="margin:5px" />To get started, she recommends beginning with choosing which images to include in the paper. From these, you can then formulate short points that describe what you want to say in each paragraph before writing full text.</div> <div>&quot;It's also important to spend time on small details, such as spelling, indentation, punctuation and other things that can disturb the eye – if the paper is looking nice, it will be experienced as better,&quot; concludes Ewa Simpanen. </div> <div> </div> <div>Text: Michael Nystås</div> <div>Photo: Privat</div> <div> </div> <div><a href="http://www.photonicssociety.org/conferences/ieee-photonics-conference">Läs mer om konferensen</a> &gt;&gt;&gt;</div> <div> </div>Wed, 25 Oct 2017 14:00:00 +0200http://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/bio/news/Pages/A-step-closer-to-a-cure-for-adult-onset-diabetes.aspxhttp://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/bio/news/Pages/A-step-closer-to-a-cure-for-adult-onset-diabetes.aspxA step closer to a cure for adult-onset diabetes<p><b>​In healthy people, exosomes – tiny structures secreted by cells to allow intercellular communication – prevent clumping of the protein that leads to type 2 diabetes. Exosomes in patients with the disease don’t have the same ability. This discovery by a research collaboration between Chalmers University of Technology and Astrazeneca takes us a step closer to a cure for type 2 diabetes.</b></p>​Proteins are the body’s workhorses, carrying out all the tasks in our cells. A protein is a long chain of amino acids that must be folded into a specific three-dimensional structure to work. Sometimes, however, they behave incorrectly and aggregate – clump together – into long fibres called amyloids, which can cause diseases. It was previously known that type 2 diabetes is caused by a protein aggregating in the pancreas.<br /><br />“What we’ve found is that exosomes secreted by the cells in the pancreas stop that process in healthy people and protect them from type 2 diabetes, while the exosomes of diabetes patients do not,” says Professor Pernilla Wittung Stafshede, who headed the study whose results were recently published in the <a href="http://www.pnas.org/content/114/42/11127.abstract">Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, PNAS</a>.<br /><br />What we know now is that “healthy” exosomes bind the protein that causes diabetes on the outside, preventing it from aggregating; however, the results do not explain why. We also don’t know if type 2 diabetes is caused by “sick” exosomes or if the disease itself causes them to malfunction.<br /><br />“The next step is to make controlled models of the exosomes, whose membranes contain lipids and proteins, to understand exactly what component affects the diabetes protein. If we can find which lipid or protein in the exosome membrane leads to that effect, and can work out the mechanism, then we’ll have a good target for development of treatment for type 2 diabetes.”<br /><br />The study is actually a part of industrial doctoral student Diana Ribeiro’s thesis work, and a collaboration between Chalmers and Astrazeneca.<br /><br />“She came up with the idea for the project herself,” says Wittung Stafshede, who is also Ribeiro’s academic advisor at Chalmers. “She had done some research on exosomes before and I had read a bit about their potential. It’s a fairly new and unexplored field, and honestly I didn’t think the experiments would work. Diana had access to pancreatic cells through Astrazeneca – something we’d never had access to before – and she conducted the studies very thoroughly, and this led us to our discovery.”<br /><br />This is the first time that Wittung Stafshede has worked with Astrazeneca.<br /><br />“We ought to collaborate more. It’s beneficial to them to understand what molecular experiments we can carry out, and it’s valuable for us to be able to put our research into a wider medical-clinical perspective. In the search for a future cure for type 2 diabetes, it’s also good for us to already be working with a pharmaceutical company.”<br /><br />Read the article in PNAS:<br /><a href="http://www.pnas.org/content/114/42/11127.abstract">Extracellular vesicles from human pancreatic islets suppress human islet amyloid polypeptide amyloid formation</a><br /><br />Text: Christian Borg<br />Photo: Anna-Lena LundqvistTue, 24 Oct 2017 10:00:00 +0200http://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Single-nanoparticle-mapping-paves-the-way-for-better-nanotechnology-.aspxhttp://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Single-nanoparticle-mapping-paves-the-way-for-better-nanotechnology-.aspxSingle nanoparticle mapping paves the way for better nanotechnology<p><b>​Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology and the Technical University of Denmark have developed a method that makes it possible to map the  individual responses of nanoparticles in different situations and contexts. The results pave the way for better nanomaterials and safer nanotechnology and were recently published in the journal Nature Communications.</b></p><div>In the future almost all new technology will be based on nanotechnology in some form. But nanoparticles are temperamental personalities. Even when they look the same from a distance, they are obstinately individual when you zoom in to each individual one.</div> <div>Chalmers researchers Svetlana Alekseeva and Christoph Langhammer together with Danish researchers at the Technical University of Denmark have discovered why different polycrystalline nanoparticles behave so distinctly when they come into contact with hydrogen. This knowledge is essential in order to develop better hydrogen detectors, which are expected to play an important role in the safety of hydrogen cars.</div> <div><br />“Our experim<span><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/F/Divisions/Chemical%20Physics/Staff/Sveta.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" width="125" height="161" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><span style="display:inline-block"></span></span>ents clearly showed how the reaction with hydrogen depends on the specifics of the way in which the nanoparticles are constructed. It was surprising to see how strong the correlation was between properties and response – and how well it could be predicted theoretically,” says Alekseeva, a postdoc at the Department of Physics at Chalmers.</div> <div><br />A nanoparticle of a certain material is comprised of a number of smaller grains or crystals. The number of grains and how they are arranged are therefore crucial in determining how the particle reacts in a certain situation or with a certain substance.</div> <div>Alekseeva and her collaborators have produced maps  – effectively virtual portraits – of individual palladium nanoparticles. The images show the grains as a number of fields which are combined into a map. Some particles consist of a large number of grains, others have fewer grains, and the fields border on one another in different ways.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>This new method of characterising nanoparticles is based on a combination of electron microscopy and optical microscopy. The same individuals are examined using both methods and it is possible to monitor their response when they encounter other substances. This therefore makes it possible to map the basic material properties of nanoparticles at an individual level, and see how these correlate with the response of the particles when they interact with their environment.<br />As a result an almost infinite range of possibilities are opened up for further research and for the development of products and nanomaterials which are both technically optimised and safer from an environmental and health perspective.</div> <div>The nanoparticles that have been investigated also operate as sensors in themselves. When they are illuminated, they reveal how they react with other substances, such as various gases or fluids. Langhammer’s research team is currently working on several projects in this area, including some relating to hydrogen detection.</div> <div><br />But knowledge about nanoparticles is needed in a range of different fields in society. These include, for example, in new electronic devices, batteries, fuel cells, catalytic converters, textiles and in chemical engineering and biotechnology. There is still a lot we do not know about how these small particles operate or will come to affect us and the environment in the long term.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><span><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/F/Divisions/Chemical%20Physics/Staff/clangham2.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" width="125" height="162" alt="" style="margin:5px" /></span>“Nanotechnology is developing fast in the world, but so far the research into nanosafety is not happening at the same pace. We therefore need to get a much better grasp of the risks and what distinguishes a hazardous nanoparticle from a non-hazardous one,” says Langhammer, Associate Professor, Department of Physics, Chalmers.</div> <div>“Our work indicates that not everything is what it seems – it’s the details that are crucial. To understand if and why nanoparticles are hazardous to humans, animals or nature, we also need to look at them individually. Our new method now allows us to do this.”</div> <div>Text: Mia Halleröd Palmgren, <a href="mailto:mia.hallerodpalmgren@chalmers.se">mia.hallerodpalmgren@chalmers.se<br /></a></div> <div><br /></div> <div><span> <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-017-00879-9"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" /></a><a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-017-00879-9"><span style="display:inline-block"></span></a></span>Read the scientific article<a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-017-00879-9"> &quot;Grain Boundary Mediated Hydriding Phase Transformations in Individual Polycrystalline Metal Nanoparticles&quot;</a> in Nature Communications. </div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="http://www.mynewsdesk.com/uk/chalmers/pressreleases/single-nanoparticle-mapping-paves-the-way-for-better-nanotechnology-2218111"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Read the press release and download high-resolution images. </a><br /><a href="mailto:mia.hallerodpalmgren@chalmers.se"></a></div> <div> </div> <h5 class="chalmersElement-H5">More information:</h5> <div><a href="/en/Staff/Pages/Svetlana-Syrenova.aspx">Svetlana Alekseeva</a>, Postdoc, Department of Physics, Chalmers: +46 31772 30 07, <a href="mailto:svetlana.alekseeva@chalmers.se">svetlana.alekseeva@chalmers.se </a></div> <div><a href="/en/staff/Pages/Christoph-Langhammer.aspx">Christoph Langhammer</a>, Associate Professor, Department of Physics, Chalmers: +46 31772 33 31, <a href="mailto:clangham@chalmers.se">clangham@chalmers.se</a><br /></div>Tue, 24 Oct 2017 08:00:00 +0200http://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Gamma-rays-will-reach-beyond-the-limits-of-light.aspxhttp://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Gamma-rays-will-reach-beyond-the-limits-of-light.aspxThe gamma rays that will reach beyond the limits of light<p><b>​Researchers have discovered a new way to produce high energy photon beams. The new method makes it possible to produce these gamma rays in a highly efficient way, compared with today’s technique. The obtained energy is a billion times higher than the energy of photons in visible light. These high intensity gamma rays significantly exceed all known limits and pave the way towards new fundamental studies.</b></p><p></p> <img width="120" height="156" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="arkady140x182.jpg" src="/en/departments/physics/news/Documents/arkady140x182.jpg" style="margin:5px" />“When we exceed the limit of what is currently possible, we can see deeper into the basic elements of nature. We can dive into the deepest part of the atomic nuclei,” says Arkady Gonoskov, researcher at the Department of Physics at Chalmers University of Technology. <p></p> <p></p> The results were recently published in the high impact journal Physical Review X. The new method is an outcome of a collaboration between Chalmers University of Technology, Institute of Applied Physics and Lobachevsky University in Russia and University of Plymouth in the UK. Physicists in different fields, as well as computer scientists, have managed to work out the numerical models and analytic estimates for simulating these ultra-strong gamma rays in a new and somehow unexpected way. <p></p> In normal cases, if you shoot a laser pulse at an object, all the particles scatter. But if the laser light is intense enough and all parameters are right, the researchers have found that the particles are instead trapped. They form a cloud where particles of matter and antimatter are created and start to behave in a very special, unusual way. <p></p> <p></p> <span><img width="120" height="155" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/F/Divisions/Condensed%20Matter%20Theory/Staff/Mattias-Marklund.png" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><span style="display:inline-block"></span></span>“The cloud of trapped particles efficiently converts the laser energy into cascades of high energy photons – a phenomena that is very fortunate. It’s an amazing thing that the photons from this source can be of such high energy,” says Mattias Marklund, professor at the Department of Physics at Chalmers. <p></p> The discovery is highly relevant for the future large scale laser facilities that are under development right now. The most intense light source on earth will be produced at such research facilities – as big as football fields. <p></p> “Our concept is already part of the experimental program proposed for one such facility: Exawatt Center for Extreme Light Studies (XCELS) in Russia. We still don’t know where these studies will lead us, but we know that there are yet things to be discovered within nuclear physics, for example new sources of energy. With fundamental studies, you can aim at something and end up discovering something completely different – which is more interesting and important,” says Arkady Gonoskov. <p></p> Text: Mia Halleröd Palmgren, <a href="mailto:mia.hallerodpalmgren@chalmers.se">mia.hallerodpalmgren@chalmers.se</a><p></p> <a href="http://www.mynewsdesk.com/uk/chalmers/pressreleases/gamma-rays-will-reach-beyond-the-limits-of-light-2223060"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" /></a>​ <strong>Read the scientific article</strong> <a href="https://journals.aps.org/prx/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevX.7.041003">Ultrabright GeV Photon Source via Controlled Electromagnetic Cascades in Laser-Dipole Waves</a> in Physical Review X.<p></p> <p><a href="http://www.mynewsdesk.com/uk/chalmers/pressreleases/gamma-rays-will-reach-beyond-the-limits-of-light-2223060"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Read the press release and download high-resolution images. ​</a></p> <h5 class="chalmersElement-H5">More information: </h5> <p></p> <a href="/en/Staff/Pages/Mattias-Marklund.aspx">Mattias Marklund</a>, Professor, Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, +46 31 772 39 39, mattias.marklund@chalmers.se <p></p> <p></p> <a href="/en/staff/Pages/arkady-gonoskov.aspx">Arkady Gonoskov</a>, researcher, Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, +46 31 772 62 89, arkady.gonoskov@chalmers.se  <p></p> <strong>Further reading:</strong> <a href="https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/The-code-behind-a-breakthrough.aspx">The code behind a breakthrough in plasma physics.</a><p>​ </p>Thu, 19 Oct 2017 08:00:00 +0200http://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/chem/news/Pages/New-initiative-process-engineering.aspxhttp://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/chem/news/Pages/New-initiative-process-engineering.aspxNew initiative in process engineering at Chalmers<p><b>​In order to provide new opportunities for research in process engineering, the Chalmers University of Technology Foundation invested SEK 32.2 million in new equipment and personnel. The purchased MRI equipment means unique opportunities for process research.</b></p><p>​<img class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/KB/Generell/Nyheter/Bengt%20Andersson200.jpg" width="200" height="212" alt="" style="height:182px;width:170px;margin:5px" />During the 1990s process engineering was heavily invested in in Sweden, but lately the focus has been more on developing the product itself than its manufacturing process. With the Chalmers University of Technology Foundation’s initiative for process engineering, new knowledge and new possibilities will be made to streamline the chemical engineering processes. The investment made it possible for the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering to purchase new powerful magnetic resonance imaging equipment, MRI, which can depict non-optically available processes, enabling analyse in detail of what happens when, for example, chemicals are mixed into pulp or when medicine dissolves in stomach acid. Chalmers is one of a handful of universities in the world with similar MRI equipment, and this now give companies like Alfa Laval, AstraZeneca, Tetra Pak, Valmet, SCA, several new opportunities for collaboration with Chalmers in process engineering. </p> <blockquote dir="ltr" style="font-size:14px;margin-right:0px"><p style="font-size:14px"><span style="font-size:14px">– With the facility, we will be able to contribute to more efficient use of today's process equipment because we will know more about what actually happens inside the device. We will be able to see what is relevant to improve. It may not be the mechanisms that we today think give effect that actually do, and process equipment can therefore be more expedient, says Bengt Andersson, responsible for the MRI infrastructure.</span></p></blockquote> <p>In multi-phase flow, ie process of material in multiple phases, for example emulsions or blends of liquids and fibres, using traditional methods, it is not possible to directly see what happens. The new MRI gives an opportunity to accurately follow the entire process. For example, in the case of paper pulp bleaching, it is difficult to see how the turbulent mixing occur, where it stands still and where it is most in motion. More knowledge can lead to better materials, but also better utilization of equipment in the process industry.</p> <blockquote dir="ltr" style="font-size:14px;margin-right:0px"><p style="font-size:14px"><span style="font-size:14px">– The process industry has noticed that it is not enough only to buy new equipment to progress. They must also look at the equipment they already have and see if it can be used more efficiently. In addition, the materials are becoming so advanced that it is not enough to look at the final composition of the product. You also have to consider how the manufacturing process shapes it, says Professor Bengt Andersson.</span></p></blockquote> <p>In addition to the investment in MRI equipment of SEK 15.4 million over six years, the Foundation's commitment to process engineering also meant that both the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering and the Department of Mechanical and Maritime Sciences could employ a new research assistant each.</p> <p><br /><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/KB/Generell/Nyheter/mri2700.png" width="750" height="199" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br />Text and image: Mats Tiborn</p>Thu, 19 Oct 2017 00:00:00 +0200http://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/ict/news/Pages/Carl-JohanSeger.aspxhttp://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/ict/news/Pages/Carl-JohanSeger.aspxHe offers methods for securing autonomous systems<p><b>​Verification is a time consuming and crucial factor in both hardware and software development. The one who finds the smartest method to quickly verify a system becomes highly sought after. Carl-Johan Seger is one of those people.</b></p>​ <br />In 1995, Carl-Johan Seger received a phone call with an offer that would change the direction of his research career at the University of British Columbia. He had only a few days earlier taken up a professor's appointment with so-called tenure, a meriting position.<br />&quot;I started my new position in June 1995 and in September I resigned,&quot; says Carl-Johan Seger, laughing at the memory.<br /><br />The phone call came from the American semiconductor company Intel, who was in great need of his skills.<br />&quot;There was a crisis at Intel. They had just rolled out a new generation of Pentium processors when a serious error in the construction was discovered. The error had escaped Intel's very extensive verification procedures. The final bill landed somewhere in the neighbourhood of 475 million dollar&quot;, he says.<br /><br />The problem was that the traditional verification method did not allow testing of all conceivable values, it could simply not be done within the time frame, even though very extensive verification was carried out.<br /><br /><strong>Mathematical tools for verification</strong><br />Carl-Johan Seger's research is on formal methods, i.e., mathematical tools for analysis and verification of systems. Very useful for verifying hardware – in this case silicon circuits. The tools that Carl-Johan Seger worked with in his research could offer the solution to the precise problems that Intel suffered.<br /><br />&quot;With formal methods, we developed a verification tool that was not only more reliable, we could also perform the verification faster.&quot;<br /><br />As a result, Carl-Johan Seger introduced early formal verification in the development process at Intel. <br />&quot;Early formal verification is extremely important for achieving good results. It is only after we verify that we can know for sure, and can draw conclusions from the work. It is usually said that we learn by our mistakes, and I couldn’t agree more.&quot;<br /><br />At Intel, he created the Forte Formal Verification System, based on his previous research, and the same verification system is still used today, over 20 years later.<br />&quot;If you buy a computer today with an Intel processor, large parts of the processor are verified by this method.&quot;<br /><br /><strong>Return to academia</strong><br />He stayed at Intel for 22 years, and during that time he has published his research with great impact.<br />&quot;It has been fun working in industry, but there is not much long-term research done. In 2006-2007, I was given the opportunity to be a visiting researcher at Oxford&quot;, he says. <br /><br />Perhaps that is where the thoughts of returning to academia took shape? So, when Intel last year announced staff cuts, and launched a retirement package, he took the offer.<br />&quot;Intel's offer turned to those who with x number of years in the company, added with one's own age, summed to the number 75 or higher. And it included me with a 3-month margin.&quot;<br /><br />Carl-Johan Seger is pleased with his choice to return to academia and Chalmers, and the mood is on top during the interview. We wonder, of course, how he experiences the transition.<br />&quot;It's a big change, I cannot say it's neither better nor worse, but on the other hand – it takes a lot of effort and renewal and it makes me feel younger.&quot;<br /><br /><strong>Important part of autonomous systems</strong><br />Carl-Johan Seger is recruited as part of Chalmers activities in the Wallenberg project WASP – <a href="/en/areas-of-advance/ict/research/automated-society/wasp/Pages/default.aspx">Wallenberg Autonomous Systems and Software Program</a>. An important trend along with the development of autonomous systems is the decreasing gaps between hardware and software, we are seeing much more of programmable hardware. There are two very big benefits to doing so – increased performance and reduced energy consumption.<br /><br />&quot;When a large number of sensors are introduced to enable an autonomous system, and all sensors are sending their data to a central processor, it becomes inefficient and slow. Through programmable hardware, or FPGA, Field-Programmable Gate Array, we can introduce more intelligence closer to the sensors&quot;, says Carl-Johan Seger.<br /><br />FPGA are circuits in which the function of the circuit is determined by software. It provides flexibility, you do not necessarily need to re-design your hardware to introduce new functionality – just rolling out new instructions is enough. But there's a big challenge, it gets a lot more difficult to design and verify.<br />&quot;Look at cars for example, they contain many computer-powered features, and it's crucial that the systems respond quickly, never fail and are secured. This is what we are testing using formal methods&quot;, says Carl-Johan Seger. <br /><br />So, what does Carl-Johan Seger think about the future of self-driving vehicles out of a safety perspective? He says that there are several layers of technology in the vehicles – all are not critical systems.<br />&quot;There is a core in the systems that we need to find solutions for, in order for the self-driving vehicles to succeed. The future is about robust technology, but it's also about working out the regulations and what the consequences are if anything goes wrong. The market will determine how big risks that are reasonable to take. If the cost of errors becomes too large then we will not see any self-driving vehicles on the roads.&quot;<br /><br />Carl-Johan Seger points out that autonomous systems are not just about vehicles. We will see all sorts of new services, inspections, deliveries, window cleaning, and a host of applications in industry.<br />&quot;The development of autonomous systems leads to an increasing need to do right from the start – and thus it gets more and more important with verification. It is simply faster and less of a business risk to do it right the first time.&quot;<br /><br /><strong>Back at Chalmers</strong><br />Carl-Johan Seger is now recruited to Chalmers as Professor of Computer Science. Which means he is back at Chalmers where he started his studies in 1981, after nearly 34 years in Canada, the United States and Britain.<br />&quot;I don’t say I'm moving <em>back </em>to Sweden. I've been away for so long, so I say I'm moving to Sweden. It actually makes it a little easier for me.&quot;<br /><br />The first task at Chalmers is to build a verification system. Intel has proprietary ownership of the Forte system, so Carl-Johan Seger could not bring it to Chalmers for further research.<br />&quot;My wife usually says Forte is my fourth child, and maybe there is something to it. I have spent at least as many hours with Forte as with my three children.&quot;<br /><br />However, he has the old system to build on, the one he developed during his time as a researcher before leaving for Intel.<br />&quot;Now we are rebuilding, and this time, of course, it will go much faster because we already know the target.&quot;<br /><br /><br />Contact details: Carl-Johan Seger, <a href="mailto:secarl@chalmers.se">secarl@chalmers.se</a><br /><br /><em>Text: Malin Ulfvarson</em><br /><em>Photo: Anneli Andersson</em>Tue, 17 Oct 2017 09:00:00 +0200