News: Globalhttp://www.chalmers.se/sv/nyheterNews related to Chalmers University of TechnologyThu, 14 Jun 2018 14:09:37 +0200http://www.chalmers.se/sv/nyheterhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/ims/news/Pages/the-2018-jubilee-professor-wants-more-philosophy-in-businesses.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/ims/news/Pages/the-2018-jubilee-professor-wants-more-philosophy-in-businesses.aspxThe 2018 jubilee professor wants more philosophy in businesses<p><b>​Professor Claudia Eckert of Open University in the UK is one of Chalmers four jubilee professors in 2018. For three months she visits the hosting department of Industrial and Materials Science. With a background in mathematics and philosophy together experience from artificial intelligence, fashion and helicopter industries, she wants to help strengthen Chalmers research in design.</b></p>​<span style="background-color:initial">Claudia Eckert has a combined background in mathematics and philosophy. Usually she is a professor of design at Open University in Great Britain, but in 2018 she spends three months in Gothenburg as one of Chalmers four jubilee professors. During her visit, her hosts are the <a href="/en/departments/ims/Pages/default.aspx" title="Link to department">Department of Industrial and Materials Sciences</a>, and more specifically, the research group <a href="/en/departments/ims/research/product-development/Pages/systems-engineering-design.aspx" title="Link to research group">Systems Engineering Design</a>.</span><div><br /><span style="background-color:initial"></span><div>The Systems Engineering Design group studies product development processes and has platform-based development as a special interest. This orientation fits well with Claudia Eckert's research. Her research aims at understanding how design processes work and she likes to compare different design areas, from the production of knitted garments in the fashion industry to production of helicopters or trucks. How is it possible to compare such different product areas?<br /><br /></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">– Looking at the design processes, the similarities are greater than you might think,&quot; says Claudia Eckert. Here you are used to vehicle development, but in the fashion industry you also start with an idea, create a concept and go on producing prototypes and test series before running production. I also believe that the fashion industry has a platform approach where design elements and fabrics are reused in different garments to create a brand recognition and to save money. However, the term platform is not used.</span><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div>The big difference between the fashion design and product development processes in engineering is the time frame.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>– The process is much faster. Instead of taking several years to develop a new product, a new garment can be made in a week.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Claudia Eckert looks at processes as a system, or as multiple systems connected with each other. The systems approach is also in line with the research done at Chalmers. She says that the holistic view is necessary to be able to develop products in a sustainable way. Life cycle analysis is a relatively common approach to sustainability aspects of product development, but Claudia does not think that the method is sufficient. </div> <div>“It is a bit too narrow. There may be effects in the environment, at a higher system level, that are omitted. “</div> <div>She gives an example from a German children's program on asparagus cultivation.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>– The Germans love their asparagus in the spring. In one asparagus field they warm up the ground to get an earlier harvest. This sounds devastating from an environmental point of view – if you focus on the heating alone. But in this case the heat came from hot water waste that a nearby factory needed to get rid of and the waste became a resource instead.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>As a help to see the overall picture and act more responsibly, Claudia encourages more philosophy in the corporate world.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>– Yes, I think companies should hire philosophers to get more ethics into the business. It may sound strange, but I think it would help them to make carefully prepared decisions. If there was more philosophical thinking, I think we could avoid scandals like Volkswagen's diesel engines, for example.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Claudia Eckert has divided her stay at Chalmers into two visits. During the first month she has had a couple of open lectures, participated in the daily research activities and made a number of study visits, both at Chalmers and at collaborating industrial partners. But above all, she has prioritized to talk with PhD students at the department about their research.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>– I am astonished about how open and close cooperation the department has with industrial companies. From this perspective, I think Chalmers is one of the world's leading universities.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Since the industrial collaboration is so strong, academic positioning is the area where she thinks there is room for growth. By offering the PhD students an academic outside perspective, she hopes to strengthen the quality of their research. She would like to see researchers focusing on issues that create academic debate and more clearly pushes the field of research forward.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="/en/staff/Pages/iola.aspx">Ola Isaksson</a>, research group leader of Systems Engineering Design at Chalmers, was the one who nominated Claudia Eckert as a jubilee professor.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>–​ Claudia Eckert is a well-known researcher who contributes with both deep knowledge in product development and a slightly different perspective which is a positive contribution to the dialogue with researchers and PhD students here. We can challenge ourselves in how we look at the research. Not least the philosophical aspect is important. One example is when society and companies are actively looking at Artificial Intelligence in their product development, an area in which Claudia also has worked.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Now Claudia Eckert has left Gothenburg and Chalmers for the first visit but in August she returns and stays for two months. For those who want to take the opportunity to meet her, please contact her host <a href="/en/staff/Pages/iola.aspx">Ola Isaksson</a>.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>FACTS</strong></div> <div><strong><br /></strong></div> <div><strong>Chalmers jubilee professors</strong></div> <div>When Chalmers in 1979 celebrated 150 years, the government gave a Jubilee Professorship at Chalmers as a gift. The criteria to be met is that the holders will add Chalmers new skills and that the university's international relations will be strengthened. The chair is usually divided into three or four time intervals during the year and held by different professors. They are designated by the University President of Chalmers.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Chalmers all jubilee professors for 2018:</strong></div> <div><ul><li>Claudia Eckert (The Open University, UK), Industrial and Materials Sciences<br /></li> <li>Hilary Bradbury (Oregon Health Sciences University, USA), Technology Economics and Organization<span style="background-color:initial">​</span><br /></li> <li>Paula Caselli (Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Germany), Space Geo and Environmental Science<br /></li> <li>Keith Hampson (Curtin University, Australia), Architecture and Civil Engineering<br /></li></ul></div> <div></div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="/en/research/our-scientists/Pages/Jubilee-Professors.aspx" target="_blank"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Holders of Chalmers Jubilee Professorship since 1991</a></div> <div><br /></div> ​</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Text and photo: Nina Silow</div>Thu, 14 Jun 2018 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/mc2/news/Pages/Multiple-lasers-could-be-replaced-by-a-single-microcomb.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/mc2/news/Pages/Multiple-lasers-could-be-replaced-by-a-single-microcomb.aspxMultiple lasers could be replaced by a single microcomb<p><b>​Every time we send an e-mail, a tweet, or stream a video, we rely on laser light to transfer digital information over a complex network of optical fibers. Dozens of high-performance lasers are needed to fill up the bandwidth and to squeeze in an increasing amount of digital data. Researchers have now shown that all these lasers can be replaced by a single device called a microcomb.​</b></p><div><span style="background-color:initial">A microcomb is an optical device that generates very sharp and equidistant frequency lines in a tiny microphotonic chip. This technology was developed about a decade ago and is now reaching a maturity level that enables new applications, including lidar, sensing, timekeeping and of course optical communications.</span><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/MC2/News/victor_torres_chalmers_350x305.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" />The soul of a microcomb is a tiny optical cavity that confines laser light in space. Therefore, this technology provides a fantastic playground to explore new nonlinear physical phenomena. These conditions have now been utilised by researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, in cooperation with researchers at Purdue University, USA. Victor Torres Company (to the right), Associate Professor at Chalmers, is one of the authors of a paper that was recently published in the journal Nature Communications.</div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">“We observed that the optical frequencies of the microcomb interfered destructively over a short period of time, thus providing the formation of a wave inside the cavity that resembled a ‘hole’ of light. The interesting aspect of this waveform is that it yielded a sufficient amount of power per frequency line, which was essential to achieve these high-performance experiments in fiber communication systems”, says Victor Torres Company.</span><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div>The physical formation of these “dark” pulses of light is far from being fully understood, but the researchers believe that their unique properties will enable novel applications in fiber-optic communication systems and spectroscopy. </div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">“I</span><span style="background-color:initial"> will be able to explore these aspects thanks to the financial support of the European Research Council (ERC)”, says Victor Torres Company. “This is a bright start to better understand the formation of dark pulses in microresonators and their potential use in optical communications. The research could lead to faster and more power-efficient optical communication links in the future.”</span><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div>The results are the fruit of a collaborative effort between researchers at the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Purdue University, who fabricated the samples, and the group of Professor Peter Andrekson at the Photonics Laboratory at Chalmers, which hosts world-class experimental facilities for fiber-optic communications research.</div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">“</span><span style="background-color:initial">Our findings do not represent the first demonstration of a microcomb in fiber communications, but it is the first time that the microcomb has achieved a performance compatible with the strong demands of future communication systems”, says Peter Andrekson, who is also one of the co-authors of the paper. </span><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div>The main author is Attila Fülöp, who defended his doctoral thesis “Fiber-optic communications with microresonator frequency combs” at the Photonics Laboratory in April.</div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">“Working with the microcomb and this experiment has been a great experience. This proof-of-concept demonstration has allowed us to explore the requirements for future chip-scale data transmitters while at the same time proving the potential of this very exciting dark pulse comb technology”, he says.</span><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div>Text: Michael Nystås<br />Photo of  <span style="background-color:initial">Victor Torres Company: Michael Nystås</span></div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong style="background-color:initial">Read the paper &gt;&gt;&gt;</strong><br /></div> <div>Fülöp et al., High-order coherent communications using mode-locked dark-pulse Kerr combs from microresonators, Nature Communications 9, 1598 (2018). DOI 10.1038/s41467-018-04046-6</div> <div><a href="https://research.chalmers.se/publication/17abc87f-538b-4039-9c3b-526d0cc82da1">research.chalmers.se/publication/17abc87f-538b-4039-9c3b-526d0cc82da1</a></div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="/en/departments/mc2/news/Pages/Prestigious-EU-funding-for-Victor-Torres-Company.aspx"><strong>Read more about the ERC grant to Victor Torres Company </strong><span style="background-color:initial;color:rgb(51, 51, 51);font-weight:300">&gt;&gt;&gt;</span></a></div>Tue, 12 Jun 2018 07:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/lifescience/news/Pages/Ulf-.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/lifescience/news/Pages/Ulf-.aspxUlf controls his robotic arm with his mind<p><b>​Ulf Karlsson was far out at sea when a fan tore his arm off and he had to instruct his coworkers on how to stop the bleeding. While some said he could never work again, Ulf wanted to strive on. And through a collaboration between Chalmers, Sahlgrenska and Integrum, Ulf now has a robotic arm attached to his skeletal and nervous system, and he is one out of four in the world who can control and feel with his prosthetic hand as with his real hand.</b></p><p>​The neuroprosthetic tehnology is developed by <a href="/en/Staff/Pages/max-jair-ortiz-catalan.aspx">Max Ortiz Catalan</a>, <span style="background-color:initial">an Associate Professor </span><span style="background-color:initial">at the Department of Electrical Engineering at Chalmers.</span></p> <span></span><p></p>Mon, 28 May 2018 15:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/A-master-of-light-elected-to-the-Young-Academy-of-Sweden.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/A-master-of-light-elected-to-the-Young-Academy-of-Sweden.aspxA master of light elected to the Young Academy of Sweden<p><b>​Chalmers physicist Philippe Tassin is elected member of the Young Academy of Sweden. He is an Associate Professor at the Department of Physics and one of eight prominent researchers who will join the academy for five years.​</b></p><div><span style="background-color:initial">In the Young Academy of Sweden, just over thirty selected young researchers collaborate on issues related to research policy and outreach. The Academy is an independent platform providing young researchers with a strong voice in the science policy debate and promoting science and research to young adults and children.</span><span style="background-color:initial"><br /></span></div> <div> </div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">&quot;I'm really looking forward to working with researchers from across the country and collaborating with researchers from a wide spectrum of scientific disciplines. As a member of the Young Academy of Sweden, I want to further my commitment to a number of research policy issues and popular science activities,&quot; said Philippe Tassin, the only physicist to be elected.</span><br /></div> <div><h5 class="chalmersElement-H5"><span>Studying how light can be controlled</span></h5></div> <div>Philippe Tassin’s research group is active in nanophotonics, a subfield of physics studying how light can be controlled and manipulated with electromagnetic structured materials. Light and electromagnetic waves are of paramount importance to our modern society, for the internet, smartphones, TV screens, etc. But further progress of optics technology is limited by the availability of natural optical materials.</div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">To circumvent the limitations of natural materials, Tassin and his co-workers study and design man-made structured materials that can manipulate electromagnetic waves—from microwaves, over terahertz waves, to visible light—in ways that are impossible with natural materials. This is achieved by using small electric circuits instead of atoms as the basic constituents for the interaction of electromagnetic waves with matter. Electromagnetic structured materials have the potential to create devices that can exert precise and advanced control over light.</span><br /></div> <h5 class="chalmersElement-H5">Researcher, teacher and clarinettist</h5> <div>Philippe Tassin’s research has attracted attention around the world and he himself has worked in Belgium, Greece, and the USA before joining Chalmers in 2013. Along with his research, he teaches electromagnetism, optics, quantum mechanics, and computer science at Chalmers. Music being a great interest to him, he also likes to play the clarinet whenever he has the time.</div> <div>As a member of the Young Academy of Sweden, he can take his interest in science and education policy and in science popularization to a new level.  <br /></div> <div> </div> <div>&quot;I would like to work with questions regarding the internationalization of Swedish universities, the public's awareness of science, and academic careers. There are no simple solutions to these challenges, but I think it is important that young academics have a voice in the debate and take their responsibility.” </div> <h5 class="chalmersElement-H5">More Chalmers Professors in the academy</h5> <div>In addition to <a href="/sv/personal/Sidor/Philippe-Tassin.aspx">Philippe Tassin​</a>, Chalmers Professor <a href="/en/Staff/Pages/rikard-landberg.aspx">Rikard Landberg </a>from the Department of Biology and Biological Engineering is also elected  to the Young Academy of Sweden. Read more about him in the article <a href="http://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/bio/news/Pages/Rikard-Landberg-elected-to-Young-Academy-of-Sweden.aspx">Food and nutrition makes an entry in Young Academy of Sweden​</a>. </div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">Chalmers Professor </span><a href="/en/staff/Pages/kraiberg.aspx">Kirsten Kraiberg Knudsen</a><span style="background-color:initial"> at the Department of Space, Earth and Environment is already a member of the academy. </span><br /></div> <div>Text: Mia Halleröd Palmgren, <a href="mailto:mia.hallerodpalmgren@chalmers.se">mia.hallerodpalmgren@chalmers.se​​</a><br /></div> <div> </div> <h4 class="chalmersElement-H4">More about Philippe Tassin </h4> <div><strong>Born</strong>: 1982 in Belgium, he moved to Gothenburg in 2013 when he started working at Chalmers.</div> <div><strong>Interests: </strong>When he does not teach or research, he can be found playing clarinet in a symphony orchestra, on the ski slopes, discovering countries all over the world, or simply reading a good book.</div> <div><strong>About his passion for physics:</strong> “You face a problem that no one has ever solved before. After having tried and failed many times, you find the solution and then you realize you’re the only person in the world to know the solution. This is one thing that inspires me”.</div> <div><strong>Read more about Philippe Tassin and his research</strong>:</div> <div><a href="http://www.epsnews.eu/2017/12/how-to-trick-light-into-flexing-its-muscles/"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />How to trick light into flexing its muscles</a></div> <div><div><a href="/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Worldwide-attention-for-optic-invention-.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Worldwide attention for optic invention from Chalmers </a></div></div> <div>​<a href="http://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Pressrelease-Light-bending-material-facilitates-the-search-for-new-particles.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Light bending material facilitates the search for new particles​</a></div> <div><a href="http://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Philippe-Tassin.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />With a Love for Music and Mathematics​​</a><br /></div> <div><br /> </div> <h4 class="chalmersElement-H4">More about the Young Academy of Sweden </h4> <div>The Young Academy of Sweden is a transdisciplinary academy for a selection of the most prominent, younger researchers in Sweden. Its operations rest firmly on three pillars: transdisciplinarity, science policy and outreach. The Academy is an independent platform that provides younger researchers with a strong voice in the science policy debate and that promotes science and research to young adults and children. In the Academy young researchers meet across institutional and disciplinary borders to discuss research and research related topics. The Young Academy of Sweden was formed at the initiative of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences and currently has 33 members.</div> <div><a href="http://www.sverigesungaakademi.se/en-GB/1.html"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Read more on the webpage of the Young Academy of Sweden. </a></div> <a href="http://www.chalmers.se/en/research/our-scientists/Pages/The-Young-Academy-of-Sweden.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Find all Chalmers researchers who are or have been members of the Young Academy of Sweden.</a>Mon, 28 May 2018 14:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/bio/news/Pages/Rikard-Landberg-elected-to-Young-Academy-of-Sweden.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/bio/news/Pages/Rikard-Landberg-elected-to-Young-Academy-of-Sweden.aspxFood and nutrition makes an entry in Young Academy of Sweden<p><b>​Professor Rikard Landberg has been elected as one of eight new members in Young Academy of Sweden. It is the first time that the field of food and nutrition is represented and the young professor looks forward to working with the academy.– It&#39;s a great opportunity to influence! says Rikard Landberg.</b></p>​Young Academy of Sweden started in 2011 with the view to gain research-political influence, promote interdisciplinary cooperation and to reach out and raise the position of science in society. Anyone who wishes to apply as a member, must have had their theses defense no more than 10 years ago.<br /><br />– It was nine years since mine, so I thought this was my last chance and applied, says Rikard Landberg.<br /><br />The first selection is based on the scientific view to cull truly talented researchers. Thereafter, aspirants are called for an interview to filter people with the right drive as well as a national, gender and scientific profileration. After a while, the message came that Rikard Landberg had been elected as one of the eight new members in Young Academy of Sweden.<br /><br />– I was very pleased of course, because obviously it is a recognition of my work! But I am also very pleased that food science and nutrition are represented for the first time. I am working hard to raise the status of my subject and to make sure that the research conducted is to be of the highest degree, says Rikard Landberg.<br /><br />The members are assigned for five years and are replaced successively, which means that the academy is constantly renewed while there are always seniors. So far, the academy has been touring with career seminars at universities, pushing the issue of Assistant University Lecturer, visiting schools, having round table discussions with the Swedish Research Council and handing out the &quot;For Women in Science&quot; Prize. They meet on two occasions every six months and the members are included in committees and groups of themes where engaging is important.<br /><br />– I see opportunities to influence particularly by working towards the whole political machinery. For example, discussing strategic and research relevant initiatives with groups of parliament, talking about how to distribute the money and how Sweden should invest, says Rikard Landberg. I think the Young Academy of Sweden has a great influence, including as a consultation body. And of course, it is important not only for me, but also for Chalmers, to be represented in an independent organization of young, committed researchers.<br /><br />Rikard Landberg is looking forward to the cooperation with the other members <br /><br />– I will enjoy the interaction with all those engaged and talented researchers who are so committed! And I also look forward to gaining transparency from other research areas. Another important role for the academy is to come out and talk with younger people, already at an undergraduate level, about what it's like to be a researcher and to show how it can be done so that more people open their eyes for research, instead of them going straight to the industry. That is something I want to contribute to.<br /><br /><strong>How will you celebrate?</strong><br />– I have already celebrated! A glass of champagne when I got the good news and then during the Academy anniversary meeting. I am very glad to have such great prerequisites and the best chance to conduct the research I want.<br /><br /><br />Text: Helena Österling af Wåhlberg<br />Photo: Martina Butorac<br /><br />Philippe Tassin, associate professor of Physics at Chalmers, as also elected to the Academy at the same time. Read more about him <a href="/sv/institutioner/fysik/nyheter/Sidor/En-ljusets-mastare-tar-plats-i-Sveriges-unga-akademi.aspx">here</a>.<br />Mon, 28 May 2018 09:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/tme/news/Pages/research-world-need-more-empathy-and-curiousity.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/tme/news/Pages/research-world-need-more-empathy-and-curiousity.aspxThe research world needs more empathy and curiosity<p><b>She is driven by curiosity, empathy and the will to create change, and believes the action research paradigm is transforming academia. Meet Hilary Bradbury, jubilee professor at Chalmers 2018. – Our work as researchers is not just about understanding. It’s about making things better, she says.</b></p><div>“A shot of adrenalin”. That is how Hilary Bradbury, PhD and professor of organization studies, describes the feeling of being appointed one of four jubilee professors at Chalmers 2018. The Department of Technology Management and Economics (TME) is her host during the year, which she is determined to make the most of. </div> <div> </div> <div>– I am honoured and grateful for this opportunity. I feel very at home at Chalmers and the department. I would like to bring together the action researchers within Chalmers, across disciplines, and help connect them with other action research communities around the world in issues of ICT, healthcare and generally the transformation of education and research. I already find it very useful for me too, to be able to talk to my global colleagues about the focus on research utilization at Chalmers, she says.</div> <div> </div> <div>We meet at her temporary home at Chalmersska huset in Göteborg, a sparsely furnished apartment with creaking wooden floors and a beautiful view of the canal. Hilary is making tea, asking questions about the city and trying to find the cups, while explaining her enthusiasm for the utilization-oriented research at Chalmers.</div> <div> </div> <div>Hilary has been successful in conventional academic terms. Her PhD won an Academy of Management award, her first publication was in the highly esteemed journal, Organization Science, her edited books have been best sellers, she became Full Professor in 2012 at OHSU.  But today she asks how to liberate the rewards and conventions of academia. How to open the doors and windows of the Ivory Tower, so our academic work is more useful to our communities.  She has a vision of academic supporting a more beautiful world, as measured by the sustainable development goals. She is therefore interested in what kinds of knowledge creation processes can make that possible. And how to engage fellow faculty and university administrator in this new way of creating knowledge.</div> <div> </div> <div>Hilary talks vividly and warmly of her latest visit at Chalmers TME: friendliness of colleagues, meeting with the doctoral students and the inspiring research and projects at the department – especially at Centre for Healthcare Improvement.</div> <div> </div> <div>– Centre for Healthcare Improvement has conducted some of the best action research in the world, she says, and mentions the mobile healthcare teams and the new patient models within “Skaraborgsmodellen” and “Kraftens Hus” – a support center for people affected by cancer – as examples.</div> <div> </div> <div>Research which affects people and creates positive change – that is the core of Hilary Bradbury’s passion for her work, and the reason she has chosen action research as her field. In action research, the researcher is directly involved in the problems or processes to be studied - and creates the knowledge in cooperation with the people concerned.</div> <div> </div> <div>– Being an action researcher is wanting to make a difference. All faculty want to make a positive difference. That requires more than understanding. We can use our work to help produce a change in collaboration. But we need to combine conventional research with the desire to help, she says.</div> <div><div> </div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3" style="text-align:center">“Our knowledge needs to be actionable – and liberating. Otherwise, we are either just stuck in the Ivory Tower or we become project managers.”</h3> <div style="text-align:center"><em><strong>Hilary Bradbury</strong></em></div> <div> </div></div> <div>The key, Hilary points out, is creating good relationships for learning together. This is necessary for building trust, sharing ideas and making experiments. She emphasizes the importance of both action and reflection when conducting research, and describes much of the conventional research as “too much inquiry and too little action”.</div> <div> </div> <div>– Our knowledge needs to be actionable – and liberating. Otherwise, we are either just stuck in the Ivory Tower or we become project managers, she says. We need a middle path that brings inquiry and action together with stakeholders.  They may be patients in healthcare or employees in business. Executives who are transforming sustainability standards in their industry.</div> <div> </div> <div>In her reasoning, Hilary Bradbury often returns to two words: empathy and curiosity. When there is a lack of these components a lot of things can go wrong, she argues. She points to many examples of this in the healthcare system, and even in the university system itself.</div> <div> </div> <div>– Healthcare is designed for clinics, not for patients. Universities are not designed for their students or the communities who support them.  What if we put the experience of the end user in the center of learning how to redesign it. Isn’t it a bit crazy and undemocratic that we don´t organize our systems around the users!<br /><br /><img src="/en/departments/tme/news/Documents/Hilary%20Bradbury.jpg" alt="Hilary Bradbury.jpg" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /></div> <div><h3 class="chalmersElement-H3" style="text-align:center"> “Objectivity is not possible, at best it’s partial. So if we pretend we are objective our research is not so strong.”</h3> <div style="text-align:center"><em><strong>Hilary Bradbury</strong></em></div> <div> </div></div> <div>As researchers, we are trained to think and act objectively. This may sound obvious, but if it’s the only thing we care about, it poses a danger today, according to Hilary.</div> <div> </div> <div>– Objectivity is not possible, at best it’s partial. So if we pretend we are objective our research is not so strong. I bring subjectivity into action research, in the sense that I believe we need to be aware of our biases and how they can reflect on our research - otherwise, we are not meeting our co-subjects! To be a good researcher, you need to understand yourself - that’s reflexivity - as well as the other, she says. We do this in dialogue. With curiosity, we understand more. We can test our perceptions. We can have more interesting and more robust insights.</div> <div> </div> <div>For decades, Hilary Bradbury has brought voice to action research, writing books, editing research work and organizing the global community of action research. Over the years, she has encountered a fair amount of scepticism towards the inclusion of subjectivity in the research area but believes that this is beginning to change.</div> <div> </div> <div>– The action research paradigm can appear scary. People want control and certainty, but as an action researcher, I say: uncertainty, curiosity and change are good things! We need to respond to a world of change.</div> <div> </div> <div><strong>Do you believe action research should be used more?</strong></div> <div>–    Yes. Way more! Action research is an evolution in knowledge creation, and I believe it is transforming academia and those who do it. With action research we see results. We also get to bring attention to important things in the world today, and communities like that and in turn see academia as more relevant. But I don´t think everybody can be an action researcher. Still, we certainly need more of it in the research ecosystem. In an ideal world, all students should be trained in more empathy and deep curiosity - about ourselves and others. Let’s have action research be part of all students repertoires.</div> <div> </div> <div><strong>Text &amp; Photo: Ulrika Ernström<br /><br /></strong></div> <div><strong></strong></div> <h4 class="chalmersElement-H4">Hilary Bradbury on…</h4> <div> </div> <div><strong>The </strong><strong>Metoo</strong><strong>-movement</strong></div> <div>“We are seeing all this raw experience and anger. Now we need to do something in response. We can move from rage to curiosity and learn during the process. In this process - which is really learning together - we can have new ways of relating between women and men.  That's new in history!”</div> <div> </div> <div><strong>The Swedish “</strong><strong>fika</strong><strong> -tradition”</strong></div> <div>“I love the Swedish fika! You meet and you talk – It’s simple, effective and creates a special platform that we don’t have in the US. The other day I started talking about a new research project with some colleagues at Chalmers, just because we had a fika together. I often think that Action Research takes normal Swedish culture of dialogue and makes it central to inquiry processes.”</div> <div> </div> <div><strong>Her Irish background and how it has affected her choices</strong></div> <div>“I grew up in Ireland in a Catholic home and learned that you are not supposed to ask about a lot of things. Important things, like women and men and how they relate. It drove me crazy. So, I liberated myself. Maybe that is why I have a drive to help others ask what they need to be full selves too. I have always been action-oriented, I initiate a lot of experiments that I then learn from.  I like to do that with others and together we make things better”.</div> <div> </div> <div> </div> <div> </div>Mon, 28 May 2018 09:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/Students-build-self-driving-race-car.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/Students-build-self-driving-race-car.aspxStudents build self-driving race car<p><b>​As the first and only Swedish team, Chalmers has qualified for the prestigious Formula Student Driverless competition in Germany. With a unique software in their car, the team hopes to wipe the floor with their competitors.</b></p><div>Already available was a whole lab dedicated to the development of self-driving vehicles, a proprietary software platform, and a ready-made electric racing car from last year's Formula Student competition.</div> <div><br />&quot;From there, it was quite a small step, to start a student team to rebuild the car for self-driving and compete in the race class for driverless cars,&quot; says the initiator and supervisor Ola Benderius, assistant professor at the Vehicle Engineering and Autonomous Systems Division.<br /><br /></div> <div>Since last autumn, twelve students from five different master programs have worked to make the car self-driving as part of their master’s thesis.</div> <div><br />&quot;It's extremely fun and educational. It's a brand-new project and we have had a lot of freedom to achieve our goals,&quot; says team manager Emil Rylén, who studies Automotive Engineering.</div> <div> </div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">A dedicated and multifaceted team</h3> <div>The team is divided into three groups, who work with each of the three main elements of self-driving: to perceive and interpret the surroundings, driving planning and control, and mechanical and electronic hardware to execute the control signals. Two of the team members were also in the team that built the car last year.</div> <div><br />&quot;We couldn’t have done it without them. They know and understand how the car works,&quot; says Rylén.</div> <div>He describes the team as a very mixed group, both in terms of nationality, education and skills.</div> <div><br />&quot;Everyone is really dedicated. You definitely do not have to be a racing fan, but rather a technology fan and someone interested in cutting-edge technology.&quot;</div> <div> </div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">Equipment for half a million SEK</h3> <div>To make the car self-driving, they have equipped the car with sensors like GPS, laser radar, dual-lens camera for deep vision, computers, and extra electronics and mechanisms to actuate the brakes, wheel, and accelerator. In total, the equipment cost about half a million SEK, but much of it will be reusable in coming years.</div> <div><br />Financing is already ready for another three years. Interest among the students is very high, as is the industry's interest in recruiting those who participated in the team. Ola Benderius and his two supervisor colleagues – Christian Berger and Björnborg Nguyen – are already gathering next year's team.</div> <div><br />It is also advantageous for the Chalmers lab for self-driving vehicles, <a href="/en/researchinfrastructure/revere/Pages/default.aspx" target="_blank">Revere</a>, to have a team in Formula Student Driverless.</div> <div><br />&quot;We get a chance to showcase Reveres’ abilities and skills, and the team attracts really good students. Hopefully, some of them hope to stay on as PhD students. In addition, the team is developing stuff that we can use in research,&quot; says Benderius.</div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">Tests and competition in sight</h3> <div>In addition to the team being able to use Reveres’ premises, vehicles and skills, they also get time on the test track Astazero. At the moment, they can drive the racing car using a handheld remote control, but there is still a few weeks work before they can go over to self-driving tests.</div> <div><br />&quot;It will be very fun to test and go to the competition. Then we can reap the benefits of all the work we put down during the year,&quot; says Rylén.</div> <div><br />While the other teams qualifying for the competition all chose the same well-established but somewhat obsolete software, the Chalmers team uses Chalmers’ proprietary software platform for driverless vehicles, OpenDLV.</div> <div><br />“It makes us unique. A stable software is really important to succeed in the competition, and with experience from research, we know how to design it,&quot; says Benderius.</div> <h3 class="chalmersElement-H3">About the Formula Student Driverless competition</h3> <div>The competition will take place 6–12 August in Hockenheim, Germany, and includes a number of different challenges: braking, acceleration, skidpad testing and a track drive. The team will also have to present and explain their software and hardware design, as well as a business model. Read more about the competition at <a href="https://www.formulastudent.de/" target="_blank">Formula Student Germany</a>.</div> <div><strong><br />Read more:</strong></div> <div>Chalmers also has student teams that build and compete with driver-controlled electric race cars and sailboats. Read more on the <a href="http://www.chalmersformulastudent.se/" target="_blank">Chalmers Formula Student website</a> and in the article <a href="/en/news/Pages/Organic-boat-building.aspx">Organic boat building in a nutshell</a>.</div> <div><br />Text: Ingela Roos</div> <div>Photo: Johan Bodell</div> Fri, 25 May 2018 17:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/Chalmers-keeps-top-spot-in-internationalisation-index-.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/Chalmers-keeps-top-spot-in-internationalisation-index-.aspxChalmers keeps top spot in internationalisation index<p><b>​Chalmers has held on to its five-star rating from the 2017 internationalisation index, maintaining its top position as one Sweden’s three most international universities.</b></p>​The ranking is awarded by Stint, the Foundation for internationalisation of higher education and research. The foundation developed the index in order to measure levels of internationalisation at Swedish universities. <br /><br />Just as in the 2017 index, Chalmers received five stars out of five, one of just three Swedish universities to achieve the top ranking. KTH and the Stockholm School of Economics were the other two. <br /> <br /><span>” We have worked strategically to recruit well established researchers as postdocs and Assistant Professors internationally, with great results. This strengthens our collaboration with outside international networks. In this respect, we improve our research, innovation and development,” says Stefan Bengtsson, President and CEO of Chalmers. <br /><span style="display:inline-block"><br /></span></span>Chalmers’ ratings in the six different categories – research, students, doctoral students, education, staff and management – are largely unchanged from last year. For example, the internationalisation of research, and the international experience of management remain at the same level, while the proportion of staff with international doctorates has increased slightly. <br /><br />The deliberate strategy to switch early to the Bologna system, with three-year undergraduate programmes in Swedish, and two-year Master’s programmes in English, has been a factor which has created a good international environment. In foundational education, today over 60% of higher education credits at Chalmers are available on courses taught in English. This has meant high mobility at Master’s level, both into Chalmers, and out to the rest of the world.  <br /><br />In postgraduate education, the same international trend is visible. Every other student received their undergraduate education at a foreign university. Additionally, Chalmers has Sweden’s highest proportion of internationally educated doctors – 1 in 5 received their doctorate from a university outside Sweden.  <br /><br /> The close connections Chalmers has with a large number of global industrial companies is also a contributing factor.  <br /><br /> “Exchanges with industry, in the form of ideas and knowledge, are essential to be able to develop as a University. A high grade of internationalisation makes our work stronger. The high rating from Stint proves to us that our long-term, strategic work has been fruitful. But we should not get complacent – the index also shows us what we can do to continue developing internationalisation at Chalmers,” says Stefan Bengtsson.  <br /><br /><strong><br />Text: </strong>Erik Krång and Anita Fors<br />Fri, 25 May 2018 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/ict/news/Pages/ICSE2018.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/ict/news/Pages/ICSE2018.aspxMore than 1700 researchers in Software Engineering gathered in Gothenburg<p><b>​The International Conference on Software Engineering, ICSE, is the largest scientific conference in software engineering. This year the conference is held for the first time in Scandinavia when ICSE opens its gates at the Swedish Exhibition Fair in Gothenburg on 27 May.</b></p><div>​ <br /></div> <div>Ivica Crnkovic, Professor of Software Engineering at Chalmers, is general chair of the organising committee of this year's ICSE. He describes it as an honor to join and organise such a well-known and important conference.<br /><br /><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Areas%20of%20Advance/Information%20and%20Communication%20Technology/People/IvicaCrnkovic_100px.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" />“ICSE is a conference with a strong link to industry and aims to gather all those interested in Software Engineering. We will both have prominent researchers from around the world, who will present new research findings, and also large and small companies from industry. To me it is extremely honorable to have a leading role in this conference, not many people get the chance&quot;, says Ivica Crnkovic.<br /><br /><strong>Double anniversary</strong><br />This year's edition is also special, as two anniversaries will be celebrated. It’s the 40th edition of ICSE, and Software Engineering as a discipline celebrates 50 years. The discipline was introduced at the famous NATO Software Engineering Conference 1968 in Garmisch, Germany. For the anniversary, several high-profile keynote speakers have been booked and one of them is Margaret Hamilton – a legend in Software Engineering who developed the software that governed and controlled the Apollo program’s spacecraft.<br /><br />&quot;It's very exciting that Margaret Hamilton is coming! She was the first in the world to develop the software required for a rocket to navigate and land on the moon, so she's really a pioneer. She was very enthusiastic when we contacted her, and with her experience she will contribute with truly interesting insights and knowledge”, says Ivica Crnkovic.<br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Record breaking number of participants</strong><br />This year, the conference is the largest in its 40-year history. More than 1700 participants from all over the world registered. International researchers are attracted to Sweden, partly thanks to our strong cooperation between industry and academia which makes us a model in many countries.<br /><br />&quot;The ICSE is a unique conference within its field and now that it is held for the first time in Scandinavia, it is a great opportunity for Scandinavian and Swedish industry to showcase and establish contacts. The ICSE can be resembled as the Olympics of our discipline, so it's a very big event!”, says Ivica Crnkovic.<br /><br />The conference was held between 27 May and 2 June and offered 30 workshops, six co-located events, and three days of the main conference with several prominent speakers and more than 500 presentations.<br /><br /><br /><a href="/en/areas-of-advance/ict/news/Pages/Follow-the-Software-Conference-on-live-stream.aspx">Some of the content is available on video &gt;</a><br /><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div>Conference website: <a href="http://www.icse2018.org/">www.icse2018.org</a>.<br /><a href="https://www.icse2018.org/attending/Registration" target="_blank">Register for this year's event in Software Engineering here &gt;</a><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />Software engineering is about developing software systems, or program intensive systems. There are few modern products that do not contain software, and it is software that primarily contributes to product development today – self-driving cars, manufacturing, healthcare, the energy sector are just a few areas where software development plays a central role.<br /><br /><em><strong>The Organisation Committee members welcome you to ICSE 2018:</strong></em><br /></div>Thu, 24 May 2018 17:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Materials-scientists-wins-two-prestigious-fellowships-------.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Materials-scientists-wins-two-prestigious-fellowships-------.aspxMaterials scientist awarded two prestigious fellowships<p><b>​Postdoctoral researcher Nooshin Mortazavi has recently been awarded two prestigious fellowships by the Wenner-Gren Foundations and Wallenberg Foundations. She can now choose between two or three years of postdoctoral training at either Harvard University or at Stanford University in the US – followed by two years at Chalmers University of Technology after her return.</b></p><div><span style="background-color:initial">“</span><span style="background-color:initial"> </span><span style="background-color:initial">I am now trying to understand which position is a good fit for me and my career goals and is located in a place where I enjoy spending time. This is indeed a very tough decision to make,&quot; says Nooshin Mortazavi who currently works at the Division of Materials Microstructure at the Department of Physics at Chalmers.</span></div> <div><br /></div> <div>One choice is a grant from the Wenner-Gren Foundation to carry out research on &quot;High Temperature Thermoelectrics Based on Natural Superlattice Oxides&quot; in John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Science at Harvard University, Boston, USA. The project that Nooshin Mortazavi has proposed to carry out at Harvard comes with an ambitious goal: conversion of large amounts of waste heat to electricity using an intriguing but poorly characterized class of still-developing high-temperature ceramics, known as natural superlattices (NSLs).</div> <div>In this program, she will spend up to three years abroad, followed by two years of research at Chalmers. This fellowship is the Wenner-Gren Foundation’s most exclusive program where only five candidates are chosen in Sweden from different fields of research.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Nooshin Mortazavi has also been selected as one of the Wallenberg’s fellows of a postdoctoral scholarship program at Stanford University, California, USA. This grant supports her to make an impact on the solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) research in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Stanford University. In this program she will spend two years at Stanford, followed by two years of research at Chalmers.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>&quot;I plan to expand my research horizon from metallic materials to ceramics with various applications in emerging renewable energy technologies such as thermoelectric materials and SOFCs. It is a privilege to be in a situation where I can choose, even though it is hard to decide. Apparently, it is not possible to perform two projects in the east and west coast of the US simultaneously…&quot;</div> <div> </div> <h4 class="chalmersElement-H4">For more information: <br /></h4> <div><a href="/sv/personal/Sidor/Nooshin-Mortazavi-Seyedeh.aspx">Nooshin Mortazavi</a>, Postdoctoral researcher, Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, <a href="mailto:nooshin.mortazavi@chalmers.se">nooshin.mortazavi@chalmers.se </a>, +46 73 387 32 26, +46 31 772 67 83 </div> <div><br /></div> <div>Nooshin Mortazavi defended her doctoral thesis at the Department of Physics at Chalmers on 21 December 2017. <a href="/en/departments/physics/calendar/Pages/Thesis-defence-Nooshin-Mortazavi-171221.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Read the abstract here.   </a><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><h5 class="chalmersElement-H5">Read more about the foundations and the fellowships:</h5> <div><a href="https://www.swgc.org/"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />The Wenner-Gren Foundations.</a><br /></div> <div><a href="https://kaw.wallenberg.org/en/calls/wallenberg-foundation-postdoctoral-scholarship-program-stanford-university"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />The Stanford-Wallenberg Fellowship. </a><br /></div></div> <div>​<br /></div>Wed, 23 May 2018 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/Innovation-award-goes-to-implant-innovator.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/Innovation-award-goes-to-implant-innovator.aspxInnovation award goes to implant innovator<p><b>​By developing an innovative surface layer for implants, and bringing it all the way from the laboratory to the market, Per Kjellin has contributed to increased quality of life for tens of thousands of people. Now, he is awarded the 2018 Karin Markides Innovation of the Year Award.</b></p><div>​“It’s an honour! And fun to get attention,” says Per Kjellin, founder, owner and technology manager at Promimic.</div> <div> </div> <div>Almost 15 years ago, he was a PhD student in materials and surface chemistry at Chalmers and, together with his colleague Martin Andersson, developed methods for producing nanoparticles of silver and calcium carbonate. However, at a conference they heard a researcher talk about the mineral hydroxylapatite, that is found naturally in the form of nanoparticles in bone. If it were possible to manufacture such nanoparticles synthetically, there would, according to the researcher, be a large market in medical technology.</div> <div> </div> <div>With the idea of ​​a business opportunity in the back of their minds, they decided to try their production method on hydroxylapatite. They obtained good results, applied for patents, and founded the company Promimic, via the incubator Chalmers Innovation, now part of Chalmers Ventures.</div> <div> </div> <div>Materials that mimic the bone's natural structure are attractive as surface coatings on implants, as they get the implant to integrate both faster and stronger.</div> <div> </div> <div>&quot;And the most attractive thing with our concept is that it is so easy to apply industrially. Dip the implant in a solution, place it in an oven for five minutes – and the surface layer is ready,” explains Per Kjellin.</div> <div> </div> <div>While Martin Andersson stayed at Chalmers for an academic career, Per Kjellin soon started to work entirely for Promimic. With great determination, he has developed the innovation from idea to product, and built Promimic into a biomaterial company with international operations and sales. Since 2016, the surface layer has been on a commercial dental implant that has been used in tens of thousands of people in several countries.</div> <div> </div> <div>“The surface layer causes more bone to form around the implant in the beginning, which is an advantage during the critical integration phase. The greatest benefit is in patients with impaired bone formation,” says Per Kjellin.</div> <div> </div> <div>Today, Promimic has eight employees, half of whom have a PhD degree. The company now has three more patents and several new implant surfaces are under development. The next step is to enter the orthopaedic field. Here, Per Kjellin envisions that, among other things, their surface layers can be useful for fusing two vertebrae after surgical fixation in the spinal column.</div> <h2 class="chalmersElement-H2">About the innovation award</h2> <div>The Karin Markides’ innovation award is awarded to a current or former student of Chalmers who has made a significant contribution to Chalmers’ innovation and utilisation in research and education, and contributed to long-term sustainable development. The prize is awarded in conjunction with Chalmers’ doctoral conferment ceremony, which this year takes place on 2 June.</div> <div> </div> <div>Text: Ingela Roos</div> <div> </div>Tue, 22 May 2018 14:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/see/news/Pages/First-ever-conference-on-Negative-CO2-Emissions.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/see/news/Pages/First-ever-conference-on-Negative-CO2-Emissions.aspxFirst ever conference on Negative CO2 Emissions<p><b>​To save the planet, it is not enough that we simply reduce the amount of carbon dioxide emitted into the atmosphere in future. We need to actually lower the current overall level, by removing the man-made carbon dioxide that we have already produced. The challenges and possibilities of doing this are the focus of the first international ‘Negative CO2 Emissions’ conference, May 22-24 at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.</b></p><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/SEE/Profilbilder/Anders_Lyngfelt170x170.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" />​<span style="background-color:initial">Chalmers Professor Anders Lyngfelt is one of the leaders behind the conference. Since 1998, his work has focused on developing methods for carbon dioxide capture, an endeavour which has seen him become one of the most respected and highly cited academics in his field. </span><div><br /></div> <div>– I'm worried about the climate. If we are to achieve the goals, we need big negative emissions and it is obvious to us that, apart from eliminating carbon dioxide, we need to clean up after us, says Anders Lyngfelt.</div> <div>The conference will feature oral and poster presentations from around 180 international experts in the field, including from USA, UK, Germany, China, Japan, and more. Attendees and speakers will be researchers, politicians and figures from industry. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>Among the keynote speakers will be the so-called ‘father of climate change awareness’, James Hansen. A former director of NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies, now Adjunct Professor at Columbia University, New York, James Hansen will open the conference with his talk ‘Negative CO2 emissions – why, when, and how much?’ </div> <div><br /></div> <div>Also of particular interest will be Tuesday’s session on ‘Bio Energy with Carbon Capture and Storage (BECCS) in Sweden and the rest of the Nordic countries’. BECCS has been suggested as a potentially major technology in the efforts to reduce overall CO2 levels, and the Nordic countries are well placed to make widespread use of this technology. Representatives from Chalmers, KTH, and other Swedish universities, as well as figures from industry and government will discuss the implications and role of BECCS in Swedish climate change policy. </div> <div>Chalmers researchers will also be joined by representatives from the Norwegian Ministry of Petroleum and Energy, the Norwegian environmental organisation Bellona, and the University of Copenhagen, to discuss the potential for BECCS technologies throughout the whole Nordic region. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>This session starts with an invited lecture by State Secretary for Climate Policy Eva Svedling, who will also open the conference together with the president and CEO of Chalmers, Stefan Bengtsson. </div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="http://negativeco2emissions2018.com/">More info and full programme can be found at the conference web site</a>. </div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">​</span><br /></div> Mon, 21 May 2018 08:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/see/news/Pages/Advanced-biofuels-can-be-produced-extremely-efficiently.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/see/news/Pages/Advanced-biofuels-can-be-produced-extremely-efficiently.aspxAdvanced biofuels can be produced extremely efficiently, confirms industrial demonstration<p><b>​A chance to switch to renewable sources for heating, electricity and fuel, while also providing new opportunities for several industries to produce large numbers of renewable products. This is the verdict of researchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, who now, after ten years of energy research into gasification of biomass, see an array of new technological achievements.&quot;The potential is huge! Using only the already existing Swedish energy plants, we could produce renewable fuels equivalent to 10 percent of the world&#39;s aviation fuel, if such a conversion were fully implemented,” says Henrik Thunman, Professor of Energy Technology at Chalmers.​</b></p><h5 class="chalmersElement-H5"><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/SEE/Nyheter/Popreport_cover.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" />Report detailing 200 man-years of research  </h5> <div>​We have summarized the work of the last ten years at Chalmers Power Central and GoBiGas in the report: &quot;GoBiGas demonstration – a vital step for a large-scale transition from fossil fuels to advanced biofuels and electrofuels&quot;. Researchers at the division of Energy Technology at the Department of Space, Earth and Environment at Chalmers have worked together with colleagues at the departments of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Technology Management and Economics, Biology and Biological Engineering, Mechanics and Maritime Sciences​ as well as a wide range of Swedish and international collaborative partners in industry and academia. <a href="http://www.chalmers.se/SiteCollectionDocuments/SEE/News/Popularreport_GoBiGas_results_highres.pdf" style="outline:none 0px"><span style="background-color:initial">Download the report: </span><span style="background-color:initial">GoBiGas demonstration – a vital step for a large-scale transition from fossil fuels  to advanced biofuels and electrofuels. </span></a>(21 Mb). <div><h6 class="chalmersElement-H6">​Pathway to a radical transition</h6></div> <div><div>How to implement a switch from fossil-fuels to renewables is a tricky issue for many industries. For heavy industries, such as oil refineries, or the paper and pulp industry, it is especially urgent to start moving, because investment cycles are so long. At the same time, it is important to get the investment right because you may be forced to replace boilers or facilities in advance, which means major financial costs. Thanks to long-term strategic efforts, researchers at Sweden´s Chalmers University of Technology have now paved the way for radical changes, which could be applied to new installations, as well as be implemented at thousands of existing plants around the globe.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>The solution presented involves widespread gasification of biomass. This technology itself is not new. Roughly explained, what is happening is that at high temperatures, biomass is converted into a gas. This gas can then be refined into end-products which are currently manufactured from oil and natural gas. The Chalmers researchers have shown that one possible end-product is biogas that can replace natural gas in existing gas networks.</div> <h6 class="chalmersElement-H6">The problems with tar are solved​</h6> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/SEE/Nyheter/tar-problem-before-and-after.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" />Previously, the development of gasification technology has been hampered by major problems with tar being released from the biomass, which interferes with the process in several ways. Now, the researchers from Chalmers’ division of Energy Technology have shown that they can improve the quality of the biogas through chemical processes, and the tar can also be managed in completely new ways, see images to the right. This, in combination with a parallel development of heat-exchange materials, provides completely new possibilities for converting district heating boilers to biomass gasifiers. <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1D2sWiGkcFg">Watch an animation with more details about how the problems with tar has been solved​</a>. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>&quot;What makes this technology so attractive to several industries is that it will be possible to modify existing boilers, which can then supplement heat and power production with the production of fossil-free fuels and chemicals.&quot;, says Martin Seemann, Associate Professor in Energy Technology at Chalmers.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>“We rebuilt our own research boiler in this way in 2007, and now we have more than 200 man-years of research to back us up,” says Professor Henrik Thunman. “Combined with industrial-scale lessons learned at the GoBiGas (Gothenburg Biomass Gasification) demonstration project, launched in 2014, it is now possible for us to say that the technology is ready for the world.” </div> <h6 class="chalmersElement-H6">Many applications</h6> <div>The plants which could be converted to gasification are power and district heating plants, paper and pulp mills, sawmills, oil refineries and petrochemical plants.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>“The technical solutions developed by the Chalmers researchers are therefore relevant across several industrial fields”, says Klara Helstad, Head of the Sustainable Industry Unit at the Swedish Energy Agency. “Chalmers´ competence and research infrastructure have played and crucial role for the demonstration of advanced biofuels within the GoBiGas-project.”</div> <div><br /></div> <div>The Swedish Energy Agency has funded energy research and infrastructure at Chalmers for many years. </div> <div>How much of this technological potential can be realised depends on the economic conditions of the coming years, and how that will affect the willingness of the industrial and energy sectors to convert. The availability of biomass is also a crucial factor. Biomass is a renewable resource, but only provided we do not deplete the conditions for its biological production. There is therefore a limit for total biomass output.</div></div> <div><br /></div> <div>Text: Christian Löwhagen, Johanna Wilde. </div> <div>Translation: Joshua Worth.</div> <div>Tar illustration: BOID. </div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="http://goteborgenergi.streamingbolaget.se/video/156153/link"><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/SEE/Nyheter/Process-video.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" />Watch a film detailing the process in the GoBiGas Plant</a>. </div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="http://www.mynewsdesk.com/uk/chalmers/pressreleases/advanced-biofuels-can-be-produced-extremely-efficiently-confirms-industrial-demonstration-2511833">Read more in the international press release. ​</a></div> <div>​<br /></div></div>Mon, 21 May 2018 07:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/ims/news/Pages/Big-Data-improves-analysis-of-materials.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/ims/news/Pages/Big-Data-improves-analysis-of-materials.aspxBig Data improves materials analysis<p><b>​By examining the structure of a metal or ceramic material at the atomic level, it is easier to understand and influence the properties of different materials. But what should you look for and where? In a new project, Professor Uta Klement combines analyses of Big Data with her expertise area of material characterization. Instead of looking for a needle in a haystack, the data is analysed to find the deviations which needs to be investigated in detail.</b></p>​<span style="background-color:initial"><a href="/en/staff/Pages/uta-klement.aspx" target="_blank">Professor Uta Klement</a> leads a research group called <a href="/en/departments/ims/research/mm/ytmikro/Pages/default.aspx" target="_blank">Surface and Microstructure Engineering</a>. She examines the properties of metals and different ceramic materials. These include nano materials, different types of coating, advanced steel or superalloys. By understanding the structure and construction of the materials, it is possible to achieve more sustainable production processes and products. Manufacturers can use less material and also use the material more efficiently and longer.</span><div><br /></div> <div><strong>One example is</strong> new thermal barrier coatings that allow for higher combustion temperatures in gas turbines such as in airplane engines, which would improve efficiency and result in lower emissions.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/IMS/Profilbilder/Uta%20Klement_170x220.png" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="Uta Klement" style="margin:5px" />In a new project, which deals with improving the grindability of recycled steel, Uta Klement collaborates with a group of researchers and combines analyses of big data with material characterization. This is the first time they try this method. She tells us what benefits it brings.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>– Our material analyses are often based on an assumption, not on a theory. However, in industry a lot of data is collected in material processing. By analysing these data we can get hints on what to look for in the microstructure. Our material science knowledge helps to interpret the data, and then we can perform accurate investigations instead of looking for the &quot;needle in the haystack&quot;.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Knowing what you are looking for</strong> is particularly important in research that zooms in on a small piece of material using electron microscopy and other complementary techniques. Taking advantage of data can be a breakthrough and become a generic approach, says Uta Klement.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>– New and improved characterization technology and the ability to interpret the results enable us to increase our knowledge and produce new and better products with better features and better utilization of the resources. Indirectly this is important to all of us.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>FACTS</strong></div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">Uta Klement is a professor of materials science with a focus on electron microscopy. She is Head of <a href="/en/departments/ims/research/mm/Pages/default.aspx" target="_blank">Division of Materials and Manufacture</a> at Chalmers <a href="/en/departments/ims/Pages/default.aspx" target="_blank">Department of Industrial and Materials Science</a>, and also heads the research group <a href="/en/departments/ims/research/mm/ytmikro/Pages/default.aspx" target="_blank">Surface and Microstructure Engineering</a>. She is also in the board of <a href="http://www.chalmersventures.com/" target="_blank">Chalmers Ventures</a>.</span><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div>Read more about the project &quot;<a href="https://research.chalmers.se/en/project/?id=7859">Grindability of recycled steel: automotive crankshafts</a>&quot; in Chalmers research database [<em>in Swedish</em>]. The project is led by <a href="/en/Staff/Pages/Peter-Krajnik.aspx" target="_blank">P​eter Krajnik</a>, professor of manufacturing technology and also includes <a href="/en/staff/Pages/Philipp-Hoier-.aspx" target="_blank">Philipp Hoier</a> and <a href="/en/staff/Pages/amir-malakizadi.aspx" target="_blank">Amir Malakizadi</a>.</div> <div><br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><em>Text and photo: Nina Silow</em></div> <div><br /></div> Fri, 18 May 2018 17:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/bio/news/Pages/Gothenburg-award-to-Ann-Sofie-Sandberg.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/bio/news/Pages/Gothenburg-award-to-Ann-Sofie-Sandberg.aspxGothenburg award to professor of food science<p><b>​The City of Gothenburg’s award of merit is given to people who have made significant efforts for the city. This year, the award goes to Professor Ann-Sofie Sandberg, who has devoted her time to building the area of food science at Chalmers.</b></p><p><img class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/Bio/Food/Ann-SofieSandberg_17_250.jpg" width="167" height="250" alt="" style="height:220px;width:149px;margin:5px" />​”It feels great! Other awards have focused on research. This one shows that my work have been of importance for the society. Additionally, it’s a good thing to draw attention to Chalmers and to our area”, says Ann-Sofie Sandberg.<br /><br />She received the news by letter to her home address, and it was somewhat surprising. But the award is of course well deserved. Ann-Sofie Sandberg has for many years spent time and effort building food science as a strong area at Chalmers, while contributing to the development of the food area in the city as well as the region. She has also seen a national development, leading to Sweden getting a food strategy and strengthening the subject’s status.<br /><br />“Gothenburg has become a strong node nationally for nutrition and food science, and it’s largely due to Chalmers’ initiatives&quot;, she says, and explains why the area is so important:<br />“Food is means of life. A sustainable society requires a sustainable human being and sustainable food production, and we face major challenges today. The food produced must also contribute to better health and well-being. Globally, obesity and malnutrition are as important health issues as undernutrition.”<br /><br />Today, Ann-Sofie Sandberg’s baby, the Division of Food and Nutrition Science, belongs to the Department of Biology and Biological Engineering and has expanded rapidly over the last few years. She herself has recently left the driver seat to a new head of division, Rikard Landberg.<br /><br />“Now we will work for increased visibility, nationally and internationally, and further raise our status&quot;, says Ann-Sofie Sandberg.<br /><br />This year's prize winners also includes Chalmers’ Physics Professor Per-Olof Nilsson and an additional ten people with different professions such as governor, composer, director and organizer. The motivations will be given at the award ceremony on June 4, where the awardees will also receive a badge and a Poseidon statue.<br /><br />Read a longer portrait of Ann-Sofie Sandberg <a href="/sv/institutioner/bio/nyheter/Sidor/Utan-hållbar-människa-inget-hållbart-samhälle.aspx">here </a>(in Swedish only). <br /><br />More about Physics Professor Per-Olof Nilsson <a href="/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Chalmers-Professor-awarded-by-the-City-of-Gothenburg.aspx">here</a>. <br /><br />Text: Mia Malmstedt<br />Photo: Johan Bodell<br /></p>Wed, 16 May 2018 10:00:00 +0200