Biomedical engineering, MSc

120 credits (2 years)

With a growing need for improvement in the quality of life, and global average life expectancy rapidly rising, there is an increasing demand for efficient healthcare systems. Combining the design and problem-solving skills of engineering with medical and biological science​, biomedical engineering improves healthcare delivery and medical practice by closing the gap between engineering and medicine. Together with advancements within IT, data science, and artificial intelligence, a new world of possibilities in how healthcare can be improved and delivered is evolving.

Biomedical engineering master's​ programme at Chalmers

This master's programme is an internationally competitive education that aims to educate engineers who can work at the technological front and use modern biomedical technologies to meet a growing need in healthcare sectors and biomedical engineering industry, but also in other industries that have elements of biomedical engineering technology. The education provides a broad biomedical technology foundation with a focus on medical imaging, medical products and entrepreneurship and digital health. 

A big emphasis in this programme is on artificial intelligence (AI), which is becoming an essential tool in healthcare and is one of the main drivers for new medical products and services. The quickly emerging technologies for processing large-scale data and machine learning are making automated decision-making in healthcare a reality.

The programme broadly connects science and technology with medicine and healthcare science. It is distinctive in that the education is based on cross-disciplinary collaboration between Chalmers, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, and Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Gothenburg. It provides a high clinical relevance through lectures and projects where students get the opportunity to interact with medical doctors and other healthcare professionals.

Besides technical and medical aspects, the programme will give you a great understanding of regulatory and ethical issues as well as health economics around biomedical engineering technology development.



Topics covered

The subjects of data science and AI, electronics, mechatronics and control, and signal processing are fundamental areas in the Biomedical engineering master’s programme. The courses included in the programme plan handle topics such as image analysis and computer vision, rehabilitation robotics, AI-based clinical decision support, and digital health. 

Master's programme structure

The master's programme runs for a duration of two years, leading to a Master of Science (MSc) degree. During each year, you can earn 60 credits (ECTS) and in total, you must accumulate 120 credits in order to complete the programme. Credits are earned by completing courses  (each course is usually 7.5 credits) and a master thesis project. 

The programme consists of compulsory courses, compulsory elective courses, and elective courses. The compulsory courses provide a general interdisciplinary base of qualified biomedical engineering skills. These general skills are then extended in the application-oriented specializations through compulsory elective courses and elective courses.


Compulsory courses 

The following four compulsory courses form a foundation in the Biomedical engineering master’s programme and each course is  7.5 credits. 

  • Applied signal processing
  • Deep machine learning
  • Health economics
  • Modeling and simulation in Biomedical engineering

In the second year, you must complete a master's thesis in order to graduate. The thesis may be worth 30 credits or 60 credits depending on your choice. 

  • Master’s thesis​

Compulsory elective courses

The compulsory elective courses will give you in-depth knowledge within a specific specialization area. At least two compulsory elective courses need to be selected out of the following: 

  • Computer vision
  • Image analysis
  • Functional imaging
  • Rehabilitation engineering 
  • Development of medical devices
  • Databases
  • Digital health: core technologies and systems
  • Sensor fusion and nonlinear filtering 
  • Machine learning in healthcare
  • Advanced topics in biomedical engineering
  • Science, innovation, and entrepreneurship

Elective courses (selected)

You will be able to choose from a wide range of elective courses based on your interests, including the following: 
  • Active safety 
  • Applied mechatronics design
  • Biological and biotechnical physics 
  • Biological materials 
  • Cell and tissue interactions with biomaterials 
  • Computational electromagnetics 
  • Human-computer interaction 
  • Humanoid robotics 
  • Image processing 
  • Impact biomechanics 
  • Materials in medicine 
  • Modelling and control of mechatronic systems
  • Model predictive control 
  • Spectroscopy 
  • Strategic management of technological innovation 
  • Vehicle and traffic safety 
  • Tissue engineering

Specialization tracks

Depending on how you select and combine your courses, you can pursue a specialization of your interest and tailor your education toward a certain application area. To guide you through the selection of courses, the master's programme offers three suggested specialization tracks within Imaging, Medical Devices, and Digital Health.

Profile track: Imaging

The importance of imaging systems and image analysis has grown rapidly in the biomedical engineering field, as well as in many other applications. This track focuses on an in-depth study of imaging data and how interesting and important clinical information can be extracted from medical images with different image analysis tools and AI. 

The following courses are recommended for this track:

  • Functional imaging
  • Image analysis
  • Computer vision
  • Machine learning in healthcare
  • Advanced topics in biomedical engineering
  • Science, innovation, and entrepreneurship
  • Image processing
  • Spectroscopy
  • Biological and biotechnical physics 

Profile track: Medical devices

This track is for those who are especially interested in the design and development of medical devices. You will learn the principles and functions of important medical devices. You will acquire knowledge in all the steps and fulfillment of requirements - from the point when a new method or idea is formed to a finished product that is approved for use on patients. 

The following courses are recommended for this track:

  • Functional imaging
  • Rehabilitation engineering
  • Development of medical devices
  • Machine learning in healthcare
  • Advanced topics in biomedical engineering
  • Science, innovation, and entrepreneurship
  • Applied mechatronics design 
  • Humanoid robotics 
  • Modelling and control of mechatronic systems

Profile track: Digital health

This track focuses on how modern communication and information technology in conjunction with mathematical tools and AI can be used to improve care inside and outside hospitals, e.g., from surveillance in the home environment to care of acutely affected patients suffering from stroke, sepsis, or trauma. 

The following courses are recommended for this track:
  • Databases
  • Digital health: core technologies and systems
  • Sensor fusion and nonlinear filtering
  • Machine learning in healthcare
  • Advanced topics in biomedical engineering
  • Science, innovation, and entrepreneurship
  • Model-based development of cyber-physical systems
  • Vehicle and traffic safety
  • Active safety​

Master's thesis

In the second year, you must complete a master's thesis in order to graduate. There are two possibilities: 
1) A 30 ECTS credit thesis, which can be conducted within a company or within one of our research divisions. 
2) Alternatively, a 60 ECTS credit thesis can be pursued in one of our research divisions, and is intended for students interested in research and development-oriented jobs in industry or in a research lab, or potentially interested in pursuing a Ph.D. degree afterward. 
30 ECTS credit master’s thesis projects will also be available at international universities or companies.

Career

The career possibilities for biomedical engineers are both bright and broad. Biomedical engineering is a globally growing future industry and the demand for biomedical engineers will only continually increase. 

As a Master of Science (MSc) in biomedical engineering, you can work as a leading specialist and developer and be involved in developing new medical products and services in business or the public sector. You can also work as a product owner, meeting end users to discuss their requirements and wishes for products and systems. You can work as a consultant, where you, for example, help others with the testing and verification of medical products and services including software. You can work as a medical technical engineer in healthcare with risk assessment, deviation management, and training based on medical technology regulations. Skilled AI engineers are in high demand everywhere. With good knowledge and skills in machine learning, you will have a wide range of career opportunities.

The programme also qualifies you for postgraduate studies. If you are interested in a future in research and development, you have the possibility of completing an extended master’s thesis project of 60 ECTS credits within the programme.

Research within Biomedical engineering

Chalmers has a history of long-lasting collaboration between national and international hospitals and the biomedical engineering industry, making Chalmers a perfect choice if you want to pursue this rapidly evolving field of interdisciplinary science. Through close collaboration with the Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Gothenburg and the Sahlgrenska Academy of Gothenburg University, Chalmers offers an exciting research environment. 

The department of Electrical Engineering hosts researchers who are internationally recognized within their respective fields. For example, Chalmers is world-leading in developing bone-anchored hearing aids and has highly prominent research in e.g. neural signal control of prosthetics, microwave-based medical diagnostics and treatment, and decision support for medical emergencies.​

Department of Electrical Engineering​

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Sustainable development 

The programme is highly interlinked with the achievement of the UN Sustainable Development goals (SDGs). The table below provides an overview of the sustainable development goals and the associated targets within the programme.

SDGS for Biomedical Engineering msc at Chalmers



Goal 3: Good Health and Well-being
In this programme, students and teachers are actively engaged in research activities on improving prehospital acute care for traffic injuries (target 3.6) as well as continuous in-home health assessment for early warning and intervention of health risks (target 3.D). The profile track “Digital Health” is designed to support future healthcare practice by using modern information and communication technologies, with the aim to achieve universal health coverage (target 3.8)..

Goal 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure
Under the profile track “Digital Health”, you will learn how to integrate health sensors/embedded systems into infrastructures, creating smart houses. You will also analyse possibilities and identify threats/challenges of cyber-physical systems to the public society.

Goal 12: Responsible Consumption and Production
The programme includes courses where you will learn about the chemical changes of food during different stages, the tissue/human body reaction to different biomaterial, and the inter-relationships between climate change, environment, food security, and sustainability. These courses promote their ability and awareness for responsible management of different types of chemicals and medical waste in practice, not only for themselves but also in helping and instructing others.

Student interview

I love that we get to work with actual doctors”​
Nathaly, Ecuador, Biomedical engineering

Why did you choose this programme?
– Since I started my bachelor, I was certain that I wanted to relate electronics with medicine. Those are my passions and I think it can be really interesting and helpful to develop something within this area. Later, I also enrolled in medicine-related courses and this enhanced my desire to go further into this field. After seeing how many ongoing projects Chalmers has available in this area, I knew this was the right place for me.

What have you been working on?
– In the first study period we developed our own electrocardiograph, so we build our circuit from scratch and then went to the lab to see my cardiac waves, how cool is that? Of course, we had every possible measure at the lab to avoid the spread of COVID-19 at these times. The assignments they give us are challenging and related to our field, so it is always exciting to work on them. Now I am doing a research project on cochlear implants, which is really exciting because it is something that can help people, with a certain type of deafness, to hear!

What do you like the most about your programme?
– I love being involved with actual medical doctors in this programme. It is exciting to learn about the human body and be able to ask them questions directly. The other thing I enjoy is the diversity we have in this major. There are so many tracks available and we have the possibility to work not only within our background but also to learn from others when we are part of a team. This has given me a wide view of different fields so I can choose the track that fits my interests.

What do you want to do in the future?
– There are a lot of opportunities in developing research in the biomedical field in Sweden. I would love to be part of a brain-related research team, and I have found some places and entities that are currently working in that area. I am also considering going back to my country Ecuador, once I’ve gained the experience, to share what I have learned and help in the development of the field and systems there.

​​Student Blogs

Page manager Published: Mon 05 Dec 2022.