Facilities

Large-Scale Low Turbulence Subsonic Wind Tunnel 

The tunnel is used in both undergraduate and research activities. It is equipped with balances for force measurements on immersed bodies, as well as detailed flow field studies using hot-wire anemometry, optical measurement techniques and advanced pressure measurements. In 2008 Chalmers Aerodynamic Wind Tunnel re-entered the Subsonic Aerodynamic Testing Association (SATA). Presently the tunnel is being used both for basic and applies research. Fundamental research includes transition studies, boundary layer investigations and wake flows. Read more about Chalmers' wind tunnel. 

OGV-LPT test facility 

The facility features a semi-closed low temperature 2:1 scale single stage LPT and TEC with realistic Reynolds number at 465000. A 200 kW centrifugal fan drives the flow, the turbine is regulated by a hydraulic pump and the temperature is controlled by an upstream water-air heat exchanger. The facility was designed for steady state aerodynamic and heat transfer measurement utilizing the wide arsenal of tools available in the lab such as multihole probes, PIV, FLIR etc. Read more about OGV-LPT test facility.
OGV-LPT test facility 
 

Compressor Facility 
























As part of work package 2 inENABLEH2 a compressor rig will be built to evaluate core-flow cooling capabilities in the intermediate compressor duct for cryogenic engine concepts. More information about the facility will be available at a later point of the project. 

Rotating disc fouling test bed 

A rotating disc rig has been designed and constructed to run torque measurement experiments as well as micro-PIV experiments. By using this rig, it is possible to obtain the roughness function of any arbitrary surface roughness in marine applications, namely ships and boats. This is acomplished by measuring the torque of fouled or painted discs (with the roughness under study) in a wide range of Reynolds numbers. The discs are rotated by means of an electrical motor and a torque meter is also assembled in the same shaft connecting the motor and the discs. The Reynolds numbers that can be reached with this compact and easy to assemble facility are even higher that the ones obtained in real vessels, so direct drag comparison is possible. This rig is an alternative for replacing expensive and larger towing tank experimental facilities, which are one of the standard methods for studying the roughness functions of rough surfaces in marine applications.
Rotating disc fouling test bed  





Generator Cooling test bed 

This is a model of a hydro-generator used for experimentally studying the flow and the cooling of electric generators. A fan connected to the inlet provides the required mass flow. The rotor of this model is coupled to an electric motor and the stator contains 4 rows of ventilation channels along the rotation axis and 108 ventilation channels per row, separated by spacers. This rig has been used for PIV measurements in order to understand the flow inside electric generators and provide with better tools to manufacturers for better design of these machines. Heat transfer studies can also be performed with this facility.

Generator Cooling test bed

Gearbox splash test bed 

Gearbox splash test bed  
 This rig is also quite compact, easy to assemble and move. It is used for studying the distribution of the oil and the losses by splashing in a gearbox, which is relevant in the automotive field and some other fields as well. The gearbox in this rig is actually a transparent box containing a pair gear-pinion assembly connected to a shaft, which in turn is connected to an electric motor. Understanding the oil distribution and the losses are important for addressing some issues such as early failures in real components due to lack of lubrication and cooling.

Papers

Linear Fouling Test bed 

With this facility, channel flow experiments with rough surfaces can be performed. The idea behind this facility is also to obtain the roughness function of arbitrary rough surfaces and being able to validate CFD simulations of the same cases, which are normally easier to run using a channel flow set up.

Chalmers’ Linear Cascade Rig (Not Currently Active) 

The subsonic linear cascade rig at Chalmers has been designed as part of a long term research project aimed at studies of both basic and applied problems in the turbomachine area. The rig was constructed in 2004 and has been used to validate numerical methods to compute flow fields (CFD) and to improve on our knowledge of the flow fields around the outlet guide vanes in jet engines. The focus in the research is on improved efficiency in gas turbines which will lead to reduced fuel consumption and reduced exhaust of greenhouse gases. Read more about Linear cascade rig.

Published: Wed 03 Oct 2018. Modified: Thu 28 Mar 2019