Systems Perspectives on Renewable Power


Electricity, the lifeblood of industrial society, powers an increasing variety of human activities. In despite of measures to improve energy efficiency, global demand for electrical power will likely continue to grow in decades to come. While electricity in itself is a clean and convenient energy carrier, its production is laden with environmental, social and political problems. This calls for a radical transformation from fossil and nuclear to renewable sources of electrical power.
 
A transition to renewables, however, is not without problems. Numerous questions demand an answer: if there is enough renewable energy to replace all non-renewables; what environmental impact that may be caused by the production and use of novel types of power plants; how supply and demand of electricity is balanced when large amount of intermittent power is connected to the grid; how the political power of the incumbent industry is balanced by other forces; and what is required from policy makers and investors to build large new systems.
 
There is not one final answer to questions like these. However, studying renewable power from different systems perspectives can help out in killing myths, clarifying controversies, deepening understanding and formulating new and more precise questions. The sixteen chapters of Systems Perspectives on Renewable Power 2014 address different topics related to the profound question whether electricity, and eventually all energy, can and should be supplied from renewable energy sources, and what is required to realise such a future.
 
Systems Perspectives on Renewable Power is an evolving ebook with annual updates. You may also want to read Systems Perspectives on Electromobility and Systems Perspectives on Biorefineries. Also a shorter Swedish version of this book called Perspektiv på förnybar el is available on our Swedish website.

 

 
 
 
 

 

Contents: System Perspectives on Renewable Power

1. Assessing renewable power

Björn Sandén, Environmental Systems Analysis, Chalmers

2. Drivers and barriers for renewable power

Tomas Kåberger, Physical Resource Theory, Chalmers

3. Are renewable energy resources large enough to replace non-renewable energy?

Björn Sandén, Environmental Systems Analysis, Chalmers
Linus Hammar, Environmental Systems Analysis, Chalmers
Fredrik Hedenus, Physical Resource Theory, Chalmers

4. Harnessing energy flows: Technologies for renewable power production

Ola Carlsson, Electric Power Engineering, Chalmers
Linus Hammar, Environmental Systems Analysis, Chalmers
Zack Norwood, Energy Technology, Chalmers
Emil Nyholm, Energy Technology, Chalmers

5. Grid and storage

Jimmy Ehnberg, Electric Power Engineering, Chalmers
Yujing Liu, Electric Power Engineering, Chalmers
Maria Grahn, Physical Resource Theory, Chalmers

6. Assessing environmental impacts of renewable power

Sverker Molander, Environmental Systems Analysis, Chalmers
Rickard Arvidsson, Environmental Systems Analysis, Chalmers

7. Energy balance and climate impact of renewable power: Is there cause for concern?

Björn Sandén, Environmental Systems Analysis, Chalmers
Anders Arvesen, Noweigian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Norway

8. Will ocean energy harm marine ecosystems?

Linus Hammar, Environmental Systems Analysis, Chalmers

9. Challenges of integrating solar and wind into the electricity grid

David Steen, Electric Power Engineering, Chalmers
Joel Goop, Energy Technology, Chalmers
Lisa Göransson, Energy Technology, Chalmers
Shemsedin Nursebo, Electric Power Engineering, Chalmers

10. Can demand response mitigate the impact of intermittent supply?

Emil Nyholm, Energy Technology, Chalmers
David Steen, Electric Power Engineering, Chalmers

11. Intermittent renewables, thermal power and hydropower - complements or competitors?

Lisa Göransson, Energy Technology, Chalmers
Liv Lundberg, Physical Resource Theory, Chalmers

12. Utilising excess power: The case of electrofuels for transport

Maria Grahn, Physical Resource Theory, Chalmers
Maria Taljegård, Physical Resource Theory, Chalmers
Jimmy Ehnberg, Electric Power Engineering, Chalmers
Sten Karlsson, Physical Resource Theory, Chalmers

13. The response of incumbent utilities to the challenge of renewable energy

Volkmar Lauber, University of Salzburg, Austria
Steven Sarasini, Environmental Systems Analysis, Chalmers

14. On the German and EU cost discourse – is large-scale renewable power supply “unaffordable”?

Staffan Jacobsson, Environmental Systems Analysis, Chalmers
Volkmar Lauber, University of Salzburg, Austria

15. Towards a strategy for offshore wind power in Sweden

Staffan Jacobsson, Environmental Systems Analysis, Chalmers
Kersti Karltorp, Environmental Systems Analysis, Chalmers
Fredrik Dolff, Ecoplan AB

16. The need for financial and human resources - the case of offshore wind power

Kersti Karltorp, Environmental Systems Analysis, Chalmers
Staffan Jacobsson, Environmental Systems Analysis, Chalmers
Björn Sandén, Environmental Systems Analysis, Chalmers

Published: Tue 06 May 2014. Modified: Fri 05 Feb 2016