News: Energihttp://www.chalmers.se/sv/nyheterNews related to Chalmers University of TechnologyFri, 03 Aug 2018 12:32:33 +0200http://www.chalmers.se/sv/nyheterhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/energy/news/Pages/New-article-about-challenges-in-bio-based-production-of-hydrocarbons-in-Nature.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/energy/news/Pages/New-article-about-challenges-in-bio-based-production-of-hydrocarbons-in-Nature.aspxNew article about challenges in bio-based production of hydrocarbons in Nature<p><b>​​Congratulations to our colleagues Eduard Kerkhoven, Yongjin Zhou and Jens Nielsens, at the Division of Systems and Synthetic Biology.Together, they have written an article discussing and summarizing the barriers that needs to be overcome to make hydrocarbons produced from biomass a real alternative to fossil fuels.</b></p><div>The main challenges are to lower development costs of microbial cell factories and to make the conversion of the biomass feedstock more efficient. In their article they also discuss how to develop new tools for cell factory development.</div> <div>The article, “Barriers and opportunities in bio-based production of hydrocarbons, is published in Nature Energy, July 30.<br /><br /></div> <div><a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41560-018-0197-x"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Read the Abstract in Nature Energy</a></div> <div><br /></div> <div>By: Ann-Christine Nordin</div>Fri, 03 Aug 2018 08:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/energy/news/Pages/Mission-innovation-champions-programme.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/energy/news/Pages/Mission-innovation-champions-programme.aspxMission Innovation Champions programme<p><b>​Does your research add something important on the road toward clean energies? Does it help to accelerate the clean energy revolution? If so, you can apply to enter the Mission Innovation Champions programme, in which the choosen projects will be recognized internationally.</b></p><p>​​This is how the Mission Innovations describes the Champions programme: </p> <p><br />&quot;Mission Innovation Champions is a new recognition programme to celebrate and support innovative individuals who are accelerating the clean energy revolution. This programme will recognize exceptional researchers and innovators who are developing novel ways of making energy cleaner, cheaper, and more reliable and using it more efficiently. The programme will call worldwide attention to the most promising ideas from across the globe. The programme will seek to facilitate engagement among the awardees and Mission Innovation governments, research institutes, affiliated organizations, and private sector investors.&quot;<br /><br />Who can register? Individual persons, (teams are not eligible to apply) nskilda forskare).<br />Last day to register: <strong>10 September 2018</strong><br /><br /><em>NB! You can also nominate someone else, it does not have to concern your own work.  </em><br /><br />Read more about the Mission Innovation here:<br /><a href="http://www.mission-innovation.net/" target="_blank">www.mission-innovation.net</a><br />and about the Champions programme and how to register yourself (or someone else) here:<a href="https://www.michampions.net/#home" target="_blank"> www.michampions.net/#home</a></p>Wed, 01 Aug 2018 13:50:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/e2/news/Pages/Unique-energy-system-is-being-tested-at-Chalmers.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/e2/news/Pages/Unique-energy-system-is-being-tested-at-Chalmers.aspxUnique energy system is being tested at Chalmers<p><b>​This week, for the first time, a unique local marketplace for electricity, heat and cooling is being tested at Chalmers University of Technology, campus Johanneberg. The EU funded initiative is a collaboration between nine local partners and is being held to find new ways towards a fossil-free energy supply system at international level.​</b></p>​The Fossil-free Energy Districts (FED) project has been running for a year and a half, and now the digital, IoT-based marketplace is ready to be connected to campus buildings and tested in a sharp spot. The idea is that buildings that both consume and in some cases produce energy should communicate with each other to avoid energy consumption peaks that are both expensive and bad for the environment.<br /><br />– FED's marketplace is unique in several ways, partly because it connects both electricity, heat and cooling, and partly because it allows smaller players, such as a property owner who has installed solar panels on the roof, to participate in energy trading. At the same time, the system is connected to the larger external network, in our case Göteborg Energi, which provides cover when needed, says Claes Sommansson, FED Project Manager at Johanneberg Science Park.<br /><br />The FED system handles large amounts of data, both from property owners own systems and information such as weather and electricity pricing, and is updated hour by hour. But it is not the property owners themselves who have to process the information. This work is done by smart digital agents who make decisions to optimize energy efficiency in the area. The AI agents are programmed by Ericsson and based on machine learning, which means that they will get better at their job over time.<br /><br /><div>– The biggest advantage of FED is that it's a flexible system and that's something we'll need in the future when the share of energy from renewable sources, like solar and wind, grows. The uneven supply of these sources causes price fluctuations to grow, but the agents in the FED system can for example predict a cold spell and decide to start heating a house before it happens. In this way, you can buy energy at a lower price, before demand increases, but you also avoid burning fossil fuels like gas and oil, says Ericsson's Joakim Pontén, who has been in charge of the IT solution within FED.</div> <div><br />Researchers at Chalmers have done simulations and analysis to build the models that will make the energy system and the marketplace work. <a href="/en/departments/e2/news/Pages/Chalmers-is-becoming-a-unique-marketplace-for-energy.aspx">Read more about the work of the researchers.</a><br /></div> <br />The two property owners at Chalmers, Akademiska Hus and Chalmersfastigheter, are obvious partners in the project, and together they are making significant investments that will be rolled out in the autumn, including several new solar cells and a large battery for storing solar power. The entire FED system is expected to be operational at the end of the year, and the tests being carried out now are an important milestone.<br /><br />– A major challenge has been to connect the property owners' systems with Ericsson and Göteborg Energi's systems. The test week we are now completing is confirmation that our property systems linked to the parent FED marketplace are working well, says Per Löveryd, Innovation Coordinator at Akademiska Hus. <div><img class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" alt="Joakim Pontén and Per Löveryd" src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/E2/Nyheter/Chalmers%20blir%20unik%20handelsplats%20för%20energi/FED-Per-Löveryd-Joakim-Ponten_500px.jpg" style="margin:5px" /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><div><br /></div> <div>Joakim Pontén, Ericsson and Per Löveryd, Akademiska Hus. <br /></div> <div><br /></div> <div><strong>Facts about the project</strong></div> <div>The Fossil-free Energy Districts project, FED, is an innovative effort by the City of Gothenburg to decrease the use of energy and the dependence on fossil fuel in a built environment. A unique local marketplace for electricity, district heating and cooling is being developed together with nine strong partners. The City of Gothenburg, Johanneberg Sciene Park, Göteborg Energi, Business Region Göteborg, Ericsson, RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Akademiska Hus, Chalmersfastigheter and Chalmers University of Technology are all contributing with their expertise and knowledge to make FED attractive for other European cities as well. Johanneberg Science Park has the coordinating role on behalf of the city. During 2017−2019 the FED testbed will be situated on Chalmers Campus Johanneberg. FED is co-financed by the European Regional and Development Fund through the Urban Innovative Actions Initiative, an initiative of the European Commission for cities to test new solutions for urban challenges.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>Read more:<br /><a href="https://www.johannebergsciencepark.com/en/projects/fed-fossil-free-energy-districts" target="_blank">About FED on the Johanneberg Science Park website</a><br /><a href="http://www.uia-initiative.eu/en/uia-cities/gothenburgiencepark.com/fed" target="_blank">About FED in Urban Innovative Actions</a><br /><br /></div></div>Wed, 27 Jun 2018 13:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/see/news/Pages/IEW-2018.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/see/news/Pages/IEW-2018.aspxThe latest and greatest in energy systems modeling<p><b>​Chalmers is hosting the 37th Edition of IEW – the International Energy Workshop – on June 19-21. The IEW is one of the leading conferences for the international energy modeling research community. - I’ve been attending IEW for more than 15 years. The reason that it attracts me to attend every year is that it’s a community conference that brings the leading figures and young researchers together presenting very high-quality research in energy system modeling, says Sonia Yeh, professor of Transport and Energy Systems and head of the organizing committee for IEW 2018. ​</b></p><div><span style="background-color:initial">​</span><span style="background-color:initial">Energy systems modeling is a growing field of research and an increasingly important tool for addressing the complexity of planning and policy making relating to energy. There are many moving parts that interact in an energy system, and many constraints – concerning economy and environment – to take into consideration when choosing a route forward. </span></div> <div><br /></div> <img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/SEE/Profilbilder/Sonia_Yeh_170.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:150px;height:150px" /><div>– We try to take a systems perspective and look at the interactions and dynamics within an energy system. In recent years we have focused on how to best incorporate energy from renewable sources or increase the use of electric vehicles in current or future systems. How does supply and demand interact with each other? How will different policy solutions impact the system? It’s really important to look at how different components influence each other, so you don’t focus on one problem and miss other aspects, says Sonia Yeh professor at the division of Physical Resource Theory at Chalmers' department of Space, Earth and Environment. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>An energy system has typically social, technical and economic aspects, and the research is usually focused on long term models, from 10 up to a 100 years.  </div> <div><span style="background-color:initial"> </span></div> <div>– Most people have the misconception that energy models can predict the future. But that is not the case. The future is impossible to predict given all the knowable and unknowable uncertainty. The science (or art) of energy modeling is about simplifying really complicated realities into problems that are manageable and solvable and to extract useful insights for policymakers and for the society. It is not about making projections or forecasts.</div> <div><br /></div> <h6 class="chalmersElement-H6">Three days - three subject areas​</h6> <div>At this year’s conference 116 research papers will be presented, and six keynote speakers will provide high level overviews and summarize the latest research frontiers in three subject areas – climate policy, renewable energy technologies and consumer behaviour. (<a href="https://iew2018.org/program/">Read the full program for IEW 2018 here​</a>). </div> <div><br /></div> <div>– All keynote speakers will be really interesting, but I am especially looking forward to the first day, with keynotes Reyer Gerlagh from Tilburg School of Economics and Management and Thomas Sterner from the School of business, economics and law at the University of Gothenburg. They will be speaking on lessons learned from historical and more recent international climate and energy policy making. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>Two of the departments at the Department of Space, Earth and Environment – Physical Resource Theory and Energy Technology whose research complement each other when it comes to the field of energy systems modeling – are working together organizing the conference. Not only the faculty and senior researchers devoted their time organizing, reviewed over 250 high-quality submitted abstracts and planned the program, 10 PhD students will volunteer at the conference. The conference receives sponsorships from many international organizations and Chalmers Energy Area of Advance. </div> <div><br /></div> <h6 class="chalmersElement-H6">Gender balanced conference​ </h6> <div>– One of the goals for this year is to bring the gender balance and diversity to this traditionally male-dominated field. This year the conference program has a perfect gender balance of 50-50 in keynote speakers, program committee, session chairs and volunteers. Gender balance and diversity are not the ends by themselves, but the means to an end where everyone’s work and contributions are being appreciated and recognized equally, says Sonia. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>IEW will also connect back to another high-level conference held at Chalmers last month – <a href="/en/departments/see/news/Pages/First-ever-conference-on-Negative-CO2-Emissions.aspx">the International Negative CO2 Emissions conference</a> – via a side event. </div> <div><br /></div> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/EoM/Profilbilder/Mariliis_Lehtveer170x220.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:150px;height:194px" />– Hosting two eminent conferences in one year has significantly raised the profile of Chalmers in the international stage”, says Mariliis Lehtveer, organiser of the negative emissions side event, conference coordinator and also a postdoctoral researcher at the Division of Energy Technology.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>– The contributions from our faculty, senior researchers, and PhD students, are the best tool we have to put Chalmers on the map, says Sonia Yeh.   </div> <div><br /></div> <a href="https://iew2018.org/"><div>Visit the web site for the International Energy Wiorkshop, IEW 2018 for more information and a full program. </div></a><div><br /></div> <i>Text and photos: Christian Löwhagen</i>Thu, 07 Jun 2018 00:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/see/news/Pages/First-ever-conference-on-Negative-CO2-Emissions.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/see/news/Pages/First-ever-conference-on-Negative-CO2-Emissions.aspxFirst ever conference on Negative CO2 Emissions<p><b>​To save the planet, it is not enough that we simply reduce the amount of carbon dioxide emitted into the atmosphere in future. We need to actually lower the current overall level, by removing the man-made carbon dioxide that we have already produced. The challenges and possibilities of doing this are the focus of the first international ‘Negative CO2 Emissions’ conference, May 22-24 at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.</b></p><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/SEE/Profilbilder/Anders_Lyngfelt170x170.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" />​<span style="background-color:initial">Chalmers Professor Anders Lyngfelt is one of the leaders behind the conference. Since 1998, his work has focused on developing methods for carbon dioxide capture, an endeavour which has seen him become one of the most respected and highly cited academics in his field. </span><div><br /></div> <div>– I'm worried about the climate. If we are to achieve the goals, we need big negative emissions and it is obvious to us that, apart from eliminating carbon dioxide, we need to clean up after us, says Anders Lyngfelt.</div> <div>The conference will feature oral and poster presentations from around 180 international experts in the field, including from USA, UK, Germany, China, Japan, and more. Attendees and speakers will be researchers, politicians and figures from industry. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>Among the keynote speakers will be the so-called ‘father of climate change awareness’, James Hansen. A former director of NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies, now Adjunct Professor at Columbia University, New York, James Hansen will open the conference with his talk ‘Negative CO2 emissions – why, when, and how much?’ </div> <div><br /></div> <div>Also of particular interest will be Tuesday’s session on ‘Bio Energy with Carbon Capture and Storage (BECCS) in Sweden and the rest of the Nordic countries’. BECCS has been suggested as a potentially major technology in the efforts to reduce overall CO2 levels, and the Nordic countries are well placed to make widespread use of this technology. Representatives from Chalmers, KTH, and other Swedish universities, as well as figures from industry and government will discuss the implications and role of BECCS in Swedish climate change policy. </div> <div>Chalmers researchers will also be joined by representatives from the Norwegian Ministry of Petroleum and Energy, the Norwegian environmental organisation Bellona, and the University of Copenhagen, to discuss the potential for BECCS technologies throughout the whole Nordic region. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>This session starts with an invited lecture by State Secretary for Climate Policy Eva Svedling, who will also open the conference together with the president and CEO of Chalmers, Stefan Bengtsson. </div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="http://negativeco2emissions2018.com/">More info and full programme can be found at the conference web site</a>. </div> <div><span style="background-color:initial">​</span><br /></div> Mon, 21 May 2018 08:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/see/news/Pages/Advanced-biofuels-can-be-produced-extremely-efficiently.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/see/news/Pages/Advanced-biofuels-can-be-produced-extremely-efficiently.aspxAdvanced biofuels can be produced extremely efficiently, confirms industrial demonstration<p><b>​A chance to switch to renewable sources for heating, electricity and fuel, while also providing new opportunities for several industries to produce large numbers of renewable products. This is the verdict of researchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, who now, after ten years of energy research into gasification of biomass, see an array of new technological achievements.&quot;The potential is huge! Using only the already existing Swedish energy plants, we could produce renewable fuels equivalent to 10 percent of the world&#39;s aviation fuel, if such a conversion were fully implemented,” says Henrik Thunman, Professor of Energy Technology at Chalmers.​</b></p><h5 class="chalmersElement-H5"><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/SEE/Nyheter/Popreport_cover.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" />Report detailing 200 man-years of research  </h5> <div>​We have summarized the work of the last ten years at Chalmers Power Central and GoBiGas in the report: &quot;GoBiGas demonstration – a vital step for a large-scale transition from fossil fuels to advanced biofuels and electrofuels&quot;. Researchers at the division of Energy Technology at the Department of Space, Earth and Environment at Chalmers have worked together with colleagues at the departments of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Technology Management and Economics, Biology and Biological Engineering, Mechanics and Maritime Sciences​ as well as a wide range of Swedish and international collaborative partners in industry and academia. <a href="http://www.chalmers.se/SiteCollectionDocuments/SEE/News/Popularreport_GoBiGas_results_highres.pdf" style="outline:none 0px"><span style="background-color:initial">Download the report: </span><span style="background-color:initial">GoBiGas demonstration – a vital step for a large-scale transition from fossil fuels  to advanced biofuels and electrofuels. </span></a>(21 Mb). <div><h6 class="chalmersElement-H6">​Pathway to a radical transition</h6></div> <div><div>How to implement a switch from fossil-fuels to renewables is a tricky issue for many industries. For heavy industries, such as oil refineries, or the paper and pulp industry, it is especially urgent to start moving, because investment cycles are so long. At the same time, it is important to get the investment right because you may be forced to replace boilers or facilities in advance, which means major financial costs. Thanks to long-term strategic efforts, researchers at Sweden´s Chalmers University of Technology have now paved the way for radical changes, which could be applied to new installations, as well as be implemented at thousands of existing plants around the globe.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>The solution presented involves widespread gasification of biomass. This technology itself is not new. Roughly explained, what is happening is that at high temperatures, biomass is converted into a gas. This gas can then be refined into end-products which are currently manufactured from oil and natural gas. The Chalmers researchers have shown that one possible end-product is biogas that can replace natural gas in existing gas networks.</div> <h6 class="chalmersElement-H6">The problems with tar are solved​</h6> <div><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/SEE/Nyheter/tar-problem-before-and-after.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" />Previously, the development of gasification technology has been hampered by major problems with tar being released from the biomass, which interferes with the process in several ways. Now, the researchers from Chalmers’ division of Energy Technology have shown that they can improve the quality of the biogas through chemical processes, and the tar can also be managed in completely new ways, see images to the right. This, in combination with a parallel development of heat-exchange materials, provides completely new possibilities for converting district heating boilers to biomass gasifiers. <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1D2sWiGkcFg">Watch an animation with more details about how the problems with tar has been solved​</a>. </div> <div><br /></div> <div>&quot;What makes this technology so attractive to several industries is that it will be possible to modify existing boilers, which can then supplement heat and power production with the production of fossil-free fuels and chemicals.&quot;, says Martin Seemann, Associate Professor in Energy Technology at Chalmers.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>“We rebuilt our own research boiler in this way in 2007, and now we have more than 200 man-years of research to back us up,” says Professor Henrik Thunman. “Combined with industrial-scale lessons learned at the GoBiGas (Gothenburg Biomass Gasification) demonstration project, launched in 2014, it is now possible for us to say that the technology is ready for the world.” </div> <h6 class="chalmersElement-H6">Many applications</h6> <div>The plants which could be converted to gasification are power and district heating plants, paper and pulp mills, sawmills, oil refineries and petrochemical plants.</div> <div><br /></div> <div>“The technical solutions developed by the Chalmers researchers are therefore relevant across several industrial fields”, says Klara Helstad, Head of the Sustainable Industry Unit at the Swedish Energy Agency. “Chalmers´ competence and research infrastructure have played and crucial role for the demonstration of advanced biofuels within the GoBiGas-project.”</div> <div><br /></div> <div>The Swedish Energy Agency has funded energy research and infrastructure at Chalmers for many years. </div> <div>How much of this technological potential can be realised depends on the economic conditions of the coming years, and how that will affect the willingness of the industrial and energy sectors to convert. The availability of biomass is also a crucial factor. Biomass is a renewable resource, but only provided we do not deplete the conditions for its biological production. There is therefore a limit for total biomass output.</div></div> <div><br /></div> <div>Text: Christian Löwhagen, Johanna Wilde. </div> <div>Translation: Joshua Worth.</div> <div>Tar illustration: BOID. </div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="http://goteborgenergi.streamingbolaget.se/video/156153/link"><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/SEE/Nyheter/Process-video.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" />Watch a film detailing the process in the GoBiGas Plant</a>. </div> <div><br /></div> <div><a href="http://www.mynewsdesk.com/uk/chalmers/pressreleases/advanced-biofuels-can-be-produced-extremely-efficiently-confirms-industrial-demonstration-2511833">Read more in the international press release. ​</a></div> <div>​<br /></div></div>Mon, 21 May 2018 07:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/e2/news/Pages/Prototype-for-wireless-charging-of-buses.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/e2/news/Pages/Prototype-for-wireless-charging-of-buses.aspxPrototype for wireless charging of buses<p><b>Is it possible to charge electric buses through open air, without physically connecting any electrical equipment to the vehicle? A prototype for wireless charging of city buses is constructed by researchers at Chalmers. The first round of tests is promising.</b></p><div>​<img class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="Yujing Liu" src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/E2/Nyheter/Prototypen%20som%20laddar%20bussen%20trådlöst/Yujing_Liu_300x388px.jpg" style="margin:5px;width:200px;height:259px" />In the laboratory at the division of Electric Power Engineering several prototypes for charging electrical vehicles are under construction and testing. <br /><br />In this project, the researchers focus primarily on charging of electric buses operated in cities as they traffic pre-determined routes with specified stops that offer good charging possibilities. Frequent charging allows for substantial reductions in battery size, which lowers the weight and cost of the bus. Alternatively, frequent charging can be used to reduce the depth of discharge, which prolongs the lifetime of the batteries.<br /><br />“The first round of tests on our 50 kW module has been completed in our laboratory and the results are promising so far”, says Yujing Liu, Professor at the department of Electrical Engineering. “The results show a transfer efficiency, from DC to DC, of about 95 percent at the desired power level, across an airgap of 20 centimetres, which is really good.” <br /><br /><strong>Charging the bus from the ground</strong><br />The wireless charging, or inductive power transfer (IPT) as the researchers call it, allows for contactless transfer of power across an air gap that extends from a charging unit in the ground, located at the bus stop, to a similar unit integrated in the vehicle frame of the electric bus. <br /><br />The charging unit in the ground contains a coil which creates a magnetic field. In turn, this magnetic field induces a voltage in a similar coil embedded in the unit placed beneath the vehicle and this induced voltage yields a current that charges the batteries in the electric bus. <br /><br /><span><img class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="Thomas Rylander" src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/E2/Nyheter/Prototypen%20som%20laddar%20bussen%20trådlöst/Thomas_Rylander_300x388px.jpg" style="margin:5px;width:200px;height:259px" /><span style="display:inline-block"></span></span>“Essentially, this part of the system is a conventional transformer but, as opposed to a typical transformer, the primary and secondary coils are separated by a relatively large air gap. The gap yields a rather low magnetic coupling and this is compensated for by adding capacitors to the coils such that we get resonance circuits on both the primary and secondary side”, says Thomas Rylander, Professor at the department of Electrical Engineering.<br /><br />To charge the batteries in a bus would require about 200 kW, which will be made possible by connecting charging modules in parallel. <br /><br />The possibility to charge city buses at bus stops, so called opportunity charging, may reduce the size of the battery in the bus, perhaps by as much as 70 percent. About 30 seconds charging at every other bus stop will be enough to keep the batteries at a sufficient charging level – just about the time it takes for passengers to get on or off the bus.<br /><br />Thus, this charging method is different from the one used for the well-known <a href="https://www.electricitygoteborg.se/en" target="_blank">Electricity bus trafficking route 55 in Gothenburg</a>. Bus 55 is charged at the end stops using physical connectors on the roof.<br /><br /><strong>Higher efficiency and reduced battery size</strong><br />“The two major challenges that may limit the applications of inductive power transfer in electrical vehicles are the transfer efficiency and the size of the equipment”, says Yujing Liu. “However, the progress in fast-switching power electronics and high-frequency electromagnetic materials has led to new opportunities. We want to explore the benefits of using these kinds of new technology and high-quality materials for reducing losses and the size of the equipment.”<br /><br />Using high electric frequency, it is possible to reduce the magnetic energy and leakage field, which is important for applications in public places like city buses.<br /><br /><span><img class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/E2/Nyheter/Prototypen%20som%20laddar%20bussen%20trådlöst/powerelectronics_transformer_750px.jpg" alt="" style="margin:5px" /><span style="display:inline-block"></span></span><br /><br /><span><em>The pictures show the first prototype of power electronics (to the left) and the primary side transformer (to the right) used for inductive power transfer. Illustrations: Felix Mannerhagen<span style="display:inline-block"></span></em></span><br /><br />“This experimental prototype for inductive power transfer is to be considered state-of-the-art today. It will serve as a platform for several future research projects”, says Thomas Rylander. “The work is interdisciplinary, both experimental and theoretical. The seed project funding from the department of Electrical Engineering has initiated an entirely new and very exciting collaboration for us.”<br /><br /><strong>Facts about the project</strong><br />Objective: To develop a prototype for wireless charging of electric vehicles, considered state-of-the-art, which can serve as a platform for future research projects in the field<br />Long-term purpose: To contribute to sustainable, competitive and efficient traffic solutions<br />Participants: Thomas Rylander, Yujing Liu, Tomas McKelvey, Torbjörn Thiringer, Felix Mannerhagen, Daniel Pehrman, Johan Winges</div> <div>This seed project is based on the thesis &quot;Multi-Objective Optimization of Inductive Power Transfer Systems for EV Charging” by Roman Bosshard, 2015.​<br /><br /><em>Text: Yvonne Jonsson</em><br /><em><span><span><span style="display:inline-block"></span></span></span>Photo: Oscar Mattsson</em><br /><br /><strong>For more information, contact</strong><br /><span><a href="/en/Staff/Pages/yujing-liu.aspx">Yujing Liu</a>, Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering, Chalmers<br /><a href="mailto:%20yujing.liu@chalmers.se">yujing.liu@chalmers.se</a><a href="mailto:%20yujing.liu@chalmers.se"><span style="display:inline-block"></span></a></span><br /><br /><a href="/en/Staff/Pages/thomas-rylander.aspx">Thomas Rylander</a>, Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering, Chalmers<br /><a href="mailto:%20rylander@chalmers.se">rylander@chalmers.se</a><br /><br /></div>Wed, 16 May 2018 08:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/Areas-of-Advance-Award-for-research-into-future-energy-services.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/Areas-of-Advance-Award-for-research-into-future-energy-services.aspxAreas of Advance Award for research into future energy services<p><b>​Sustainability, digitalisation and service innovation in the energy sector are the ingredients of the collaborative project which is receiving the 2018 Areas of Advance Award. Chalmers researchers Árni Halldórsson, Holger Wallbaum, Ida Gremyr and Sofia Börjesson are receiving the award for their multidisciplinary collaboration.</b></p>​ <br />Digitalisation is contributing to far-reaching changes in almost all sectors of society, which means that we can do things in different ways and do completely new things. At the same time, we must address the question – how?<br /><br />Researchers from the departments of Technology Management and Economics, and Architecture and Civil Engineering are collaborating on the project “Energy Services: Processes for Innovation, Provision, and Use of Customer Feedback”. <br /><br />“The energy sector faces a challenge as on the one hand it needs to obtain a good return on its sales of renewable energy and from its capabilities and technology, while on the other also contributing to the customer’s energy efficiency. We are therefore looking at new ways of designing services which provide added value for customers, promoting the transition to sustainable energy consumption and guaranteeing steadyrevenue streams”, says project manager Halldórsson.<br /><br /><strong>Customers become key players</strong><br />Customers and end-users can become key players in the energy company’s ecosystem and contribute to continued energy efficiency. <br /><br />“New digital technology allows us to measure performance, using sensors for example, gather data and analyse phenomena more extensively than in the past. This gives us the opportunity to design new innovative services,” says Gremyr.<br /><br />Researchers working on the project have started assessing processes and needs throughout the chain from energy supplier, property owner/manager to customer, to learn key lessons which will form the basis of future energy services.<br /><br />“The idea is that the design of the services can contribute to a more sustainable society by influencing customer behaviour, for example. It is also interesting to analyse the conditions required for new types of services to become established,” Wallbaum says.<br /><br /><strong>A collaborative research approach</strong><br />The project is a pilot study which was made possible through seed funding provided by the Energy Area of Advance and the work is being undertaken in close collaboration with Göteborg Energi. <br /><br />“Here we have a great opportunity to get involved with Göteborg Energi and understand their perspective, the same goes for the customer and end-user side, and from there we try to conceptualise the service development. We don’t yet know where this will take us, there is no final template so we are navigating from our different perspectives,” Börjesson says.<br /><br />“What is clear is that this is a key issue. Everyone knows this work has to be done but just what is needed is complex. It affects different areas of expertise, systems, people, business models and technologies,” Gremyr says.<br /><br /><strong>Research spotlighted in professional education</strong><br />Future services will of course also create complexity for purchasing and procurement, something which Halldórsson has lectured on through Chalmers Professional Education. In other respects it can be seen that the service development area has not yet made much of an impact in the education provided at Chalmers.<br /><br />“There are many new subject areas which have emerged and which do not yet form part of Chalmers’ courses. But there are already educational components where these can be included, such as in degree projects, or quite simply by shining the spotlight on our research in our teaching,” says Börjesson.<br /><br /><strong>Applications in all industries</strong><br />The researchers are already aware of opportunities for continued collaboration after they have completed their pilot study. <br />“The project we are conducting on sustainability and digitalisation can be applied to other contexts. This then opens many doors – in a number of different industries,” Halldórsson says.<br /><br />They all agree that the Areas of Advance have an important role to play in promoting multidisciplinary collaboration at Chalmers. This in turn lays the foundations for an exchange of expertise and renewal.<br />“New contacts can also reduce the thresholds for collaboration in our infrastructures, where you might not always realise that you are in demand,” says Wallbaum.<br /><br />“And seed funding from the Area of Advance gives the slight nudge which makes collaboration happen,” Börjesson says.<br /><br /><br /><strong>Award winners </strong><br /><a href="/en/staff/Pages/sofia-borjesson.aspx" target="_blank">Sofia Börjesson</a>, Professor, Technology Management and Economics. She conducts research into the organisation and management of innovation in established organisations and into the prerequisites for innovation. <br /><br /><a href="/en/staff/Pages/ida-gremyr.aspx" target="_blank">Ida Gremyr</a>, Professor, Technology Management and Economics. She conducts research into quality management and service development, service innovation and processes for increased customer interaction.<br /><br /><a href="/sv/personal/Sidor/arni-halldorsson.aspx" target="_blank">Árni Halldórsson</a>, Professor, Technology Management and Economics. He conducts research into service supply chains, customer-supplier relationships and energy efficiency.<br /><br /><a href="/en/staff/Pages/holger-wallbaum.aspx">Holger Wallbaum</a>, Professor, Architecture and Civil Engineering. He conducts research on sustainability strategies for building stocks, energy-efficient renovation and smart infrastructures.<br /><br /><br /><br /><strong>The Areas of Advance Award</strong><br />Through the Areas of Advance Award, the leadership at Chalmers wants to reward people who have made significant contributions to interdisciplinary collaborations and who, in the spirit of the Areas of Advance, integrate research, education and utilisation. The award will be bestowed during the doctoral degree ceremony on 2 June 2018.<br /> <br /><em>Text: Malin Ulfvarson</em><br /><em>Photo: Johan Bodell</em>Wed, 09 May 2018 16:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/energy/news/Pages/Uncharged-dialog-on-choises-of-fuel.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/energy/news/Pages/Uncharged-dialog-on-choises-of-fuel.aspxElectricity &amp; Biofuels – do we need both?&quot; delivered a wide and varied knowledge and dialogue<p><b>​Areas of Advance Energy and Transports&#39; lunch seminar with RISE delivered well-informed presentations, a heated discussion on fuel preferences but also an noticeable consensus on the need for several future fuel alternatives.</b></p><p>​On Thursday the 26th of April 2018 presenters and panel members from Chalmers och RISE teamed up for a lunch seminar on different future alternative fuel choices. Presenters were Maria Grahn, Chalmers Area of Advance Energy, and Patrik Klintbom from RISE, and the panel members were Frances Sprei and Jonas Sjöblom from Chalmers together with Karin Pettersson and Markus Norström from RISE. </p> <br /> <p><span lang="SV"></span>Several different alternatives for future choices of fuels were presented and discussed, and a slight discern for certain fuels was noticed between presenters, panel members and the audicence. The lunch seminar gathered a substantial group of participants and the level of their interest became very apparent after the <span lang="SV">presentations and panel debate, when it was time for questions. </span>Differences in preferences became obvious and the debate sometimes even got slightly heated. But on the matter of if one or more choices of fuels would be the route for the future, the debate revealed a quite pronouced concensus. The conclusion that choosing one single fuel alternative in the future will probably show itself very difficult and problematic, appeard quite unanimous, and the seminar instead expressed the probable need for two or more different fuel options.<br /></p> <p>  </p> <p><img class="chalmersPosition-FloatLeft" src="/SiteCollectionImages/Areas%20of%20Advance/Energy/lunchseminarier/IMG_0221_Lunchsem-180426_medSamtycke_SOE0001_350x305px.jpg" alt="" style="margin:5px" /></p> <p><em>From left to right: Markus Norström, RISE, Jonas Sjöblom, Maria Grahn och Frances Sprei, Chalmers, Johanna Mossberg och Patrik Klintbom, RISE, Selma Brynolf, Chalmers samt Karin Pettersson, RISE.</em></p> <h6 class="chalmersElement-H6"><em> </em></h6><p><br /></p> <p><br /></p> <p><br /></p> <p><br /></p> <br /><p><br /></p> <p><br /></p> <p><a href="/en/areas-of-advance/energy/events/Pages/Electricity-and-Biofuels_Do-we-need-both.aspx">Agenda »<br /></a></p> <p>Presentation materials:<em><br /></em></p> <p><em>Maria Grahn:</em> <a href="/SiteCollectionDocuments/SO%20Energi/Maria-Grahn_Pres_The-role-of-biofuels-electrofuels-and--180426.pdf">The role of biofuels, electrofuels and electricity in the transformation of the transport sector. »</a></p> <p><em>Patrik Klintbom: </em><a href="/SiteCollectionDocuments/SO%20Energi/Patrik-Klintbom_Pres_Electricity-and-biofuels-synergies-and-competition_180426.pdf">Electricity and biofuels – synergies and competition. »</a></p>Fri, 04 May 2018 14:00:00 +0200https://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/energy/news/Pages/Valbesokt-lunchseminarium.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/energy/news/Pages/Valbesokt-lunchseminarium.aspxWell-attended lunch seminar on FFI-projects<p><b>​When Areas of Advance Transport and Energy invited to a lunch seminar on successful, industry relevant research projects, focus on FFI, it became apparent that the subject is interesting - even when the amount of available seats was doubled the seminar was fully booked within short.</b></p>Areas of Advance Transport and Energy last week welcomed Peter Kasche, from the Swedish Energy Agency, and Lars Davidson, from the department of Mechanic and Maritime sciences, to a lunch seminar on the subject successful, industry relevant research projects, focus on FFI. (FFI: strategic vehicle research and innovation).   <br /><br />Peter Kasche gave a presentation on the Ministry of Energy's view on FFI-projects, what to consider when applying and what makes an FFI-project successful. Lars Davidson shared his experience on former and present FFI-projects. <span><span style="display:inline-block"></span></span><br /><br /><span>The event was very well attended. Despite having doubled the amount of seats available, the seminar was fully booked within days after the release of the event. During the seminar both presentations were very well received and the lunch seminar was wrapped up with a number of dedicated and interested questions and discussions. As it appears, the subject of FFI-projects is very intriguing. </span><br />Mon, 19 Mar 2018 14:00:00 +0100https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/e2/news/Pages/Mats-Leijon-comes-full-circle-by-joining-Chalmers.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/e2/news/Pages/Mats-Leijon-comes-full-circle-by-joining-Chalmers.aspxA profile in renewables returns<p><b>​After 35 productive years as a researcher, inventor and entrepreneur, Mats Leijon has returned to Chalmers, where he once started his career, now as a Professor in Electrical Engineering.</b></p>​“This is a new and exciting step for me”, Mats Leijon says. “I see myself as a resource for younger researchers, with the purpose to contribute with my knowledge where I can make the most of it.”<br /><br />His career started with studies in electrical engineering at Chalmers in the 1980s. After having defended his doctoral thesis in high voltage engineering in 1987 he started working at ABB in Västerås. During his 13 years at the company he had several positions and worked as head of research, developing technology for measurements of diagnostics and monitoring of insulation systems and electrical power devices. In addition, he has invented and developed products in power generation. Most known is perhaps the Powerformer, a high voltage generator for connection to the grid without any intermediate transformer.<br /><br /><strong>Developing renewables</strong><br />Since 2000, Mats Leijon is a Professor in electrical science at Uppsala University. He has got about 1500 patents and has published more than 300 scientific articles. Developing renewable energy sources by using waves, wind and tidal currents have become his specialty. In parallel he has started the company Seabased, which plans, builds and installs complete, grid-connected wave parks at sea. Research and demonstration facilities are located outside Lysekil.<br /><br />He is now phasing out part of his many commitments to be able to take on the assignment at Chalmers.<br /><br />&quot;I look forward to combining theory and practice to a larger extent than I have been able to do previously in academia&quot;, says Mats Leijon. “Here at the division of Electrical Power Engineering, there are good laboratory activities.”<br /><br />In his opinion, setting high goals is crucial to success.<br /><br />“First of all, I'm going to familiarise myself with the research activities here, and then apply for funding to do exciting research, but it is still too early to say in what areas this will be.”<br /><br /><strong><img class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/E2/Profilbilder%20Elkraftteknik/Mats-Leijon_300x300px.jpg" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:250px;height:250px" />Important to do one´s homework</strong><br />“As a researcher, it is important not to limit your mind. One prerequisite is that you have done your homework and have a solid and stable knowledge base founded in basic theory”, Mats emphasises. “That gives you qualifications to take responsibility for development in society.”<br /><br />&quot;In order to implement your ideas, as an engineer, you can´t ignore what is possible to put into practice and what is commercially viable”, he states. “It is important to understand how your own research fits into the big picture.”<br /><br />He sees the conformity within academia as a problem.<br /><br />”People of the same type tend to choose the same type of solutions. The question is then if the right solutions really are highlighted? At Uppsala University, women account for about 40 percent in the field of electrical engineering. Perhaps I have some lessons learnt, that I could bring here”, Mats Leijon concludes.<br /><br />Text: Yvonne Jonsson<br /><br /><strong>Contact: </strong><a href="/en/Staff/Pages/Mats-Leijon.aspx">Mats Leijon</a>, Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering, Chalmers Fri, 16 Feb 2018 08:30:00 +0100https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/e2/news/Pages/International-award-in-mechanical-pulping-to-Anders-Karlstrom.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/e2/news/Pages/International-award-in-mechanical-pulping-to-Anders-Karlstrom.aspxRewarded for new paradigm in pulping technology<p><b>​The Arne Asplund Mechanical Pulping Award 2018 has been granted to Professor Anders Karlström, Head of the department Electrical Engineering at Chalmers.</b></p>​The award is given out every two years by Arne Asplund Mechanical Pulping Award Foundation to promote the development of new technology for the manufacture of high-yield pulp. It is awarded in recognition of outstanding achievement in research and development of mechanical pulping technology.<br /><br /><span>“To receive this award is a great honor for me”, Anders Karlström says. “I have been working with this for many years and it feels fantastic to get a confirmation that the struggle really has been worthwhile.”<span style="display:inline-block"></span></span><br /><br />The justification for the award reads as follows: “Based on his deep understanding of the fundamentals of refining in mechanical and chemimechanical pulping, Anders Karlström has initiated a paradigm shift regarding the theory of refining by introducing the entropy model. This new approach offers tools to understand the interplay in the refining zone with regards to refiner operation, plate patterns and the produced pulp quality. These new findings are already in use in several production lines offering a set of possible ways to optimise quality and specific energy input.”<br /><br />The award consists of a gold medal and an honorarium of SEK 25,000. The prize ceremony will take place at the International Mechanical Pulping Conference, IMPC, in Trondheim on 29 May. <br /><br />Regarded as the &quot;Nobel Prize&quot; in the field of mechanical pulping, the Arne Asplund Mechanical Pulping Award was established in 1985 to commemorate the Swedish engineer Arne Asplund’s contribution to the pulp and paper industry worldwide. He was the inventor of the thermomechanical pulping technique, known as the defibrator-method, also called the Asplund-method, for pulping wooden chips.<br /><br /><a href="http://www.valmet.com/media/news/press-releases/2018/the-arne-asplund-mechanical-pulping-award-2018-granted-to-anders-karlstrom/" target="_blank"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Read the press release</a><br /><br /><strong>Contact:</strong> <a href="/sv/personal/Sidor/anders-karlstrom.aspx">Anders Karlström</a>, Professor and Head of the Department Electrical Engineering, Chalmers<br />Thu, 15 Feb 2018 13:00:00 +0100https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Patrik-Johansson-in-charge-of-European-battery-research-network-.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/physics/news/Pages/Patrik-Johansson-in-charge-of-European-battery-research-network-.aspxIn charge of the largest battery research network in Europe<p><b>​​Patrik Johansson, Professor at the Department of Physics at Chalmers, has been elected new co-director of a large European battery research network – Alistore European Research Institute (Alistore-ERI).</b></p><img src="/SiteCollectionImages/Institutioner/F/Blandade%20dimensioner%20inne%20i%20artikel/Patrik_Johansson200x270.jpg" class="chalmersPosition-FloatRight" alt="" style="margin:5px" />The network is the largest academic-industrial collaboration on batteries in Europe and aims to tackle battery challenges and move towards sustainable energy solutions. The network has about 25 partners, with academic entities such as Cambridge, Oxford and Collège de France, and Bosch, Saft,  BASF and Renault on the industry side.<p></p> “Due to the current electromobility (r)evolution and the need to efficiently store renewable energy, Alistore-ERI is more important than ever before. As researchers, we create projects and share ideas within the network and get important feedback from other academics and the industrial partners,” says Patrik Johansson, who takes part in several national and international projects to develop the next generation of batteries.<p></p> Patrik Johansson will mainly be responsible for strategies for expansion of the network, to increase the internal and external interactions, as well as taking part in defining the research strategy. <p></p> “My role will be to build an even stronger network for future challenges – an inspiring task with many openings for Swedish industry as well,” says Patrik Johansson. <p></p> He will officially start his new assignment on 1st of January and will share the direction with Prof. Christian Masquelier from France and Dr. Robert Dominko from Slovenia. <p></p> Text: Mia Halleröd Palmgren, <a href="mailto:mia.hallerodpalmgren@chalmers.se">mia.hallerodpalmgren@chalmers.se</a><br /><br /><a href="http://www.alistore.eu/"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/icgen.gif" alt="" />Read more about Alistore-European Research Institute (Alistore-ERI).</a><br /><a href="/en/Staff/Pages/Patrik-Johansson0603-6580.aspx"><img class="ms-asset-icon ms-rtePosition-4" src="/_layouts/images/ichtm.gif" alt="" />Read more about Patrik Johansson and his research at Chalmers University of Technology.</a><br />Thu, 14 Dec 2017 00:00:00 +0100https://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/Top-scientists-in-sustainable-energy-gathers-at-Chalmers.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/news/Pages/Top-scientists-in-sustainable-energy-gathers-at-Chalmers.aspxTop scientists in sustainable energy gathers at Chalmers<p><b>​On 6-8 December, the Sustainable Energy Symposium is held at Chalmers, in collaboration with the Molecular Frontiers. The seminar brings together world-leading researchers from several science disciplines to present the latest advances within the field.</b></p>​ <br />The conference gathers distinguished researchers, industry representatives, decision makers and an engaged public for presentations and discussions on future energy solutions. Development of sustainable technologies for solar energy, batteries and energy storage is needed to make the necessary switch from fossil fuels to renewable energy sources. During the conference, the latest advances in the field will be highlighted, and the content will be made available to the public. Through live broadcast at <a href="http://www.youtube.com/molecluestv" target="_blank">Molecular Frontiers YouTube Channel</a>  you will be able to follow the conference even if you are not in place. <br /><br /><br /><strong>150 high school students participate</strong><br />Sustainable Energy Symposium is a unique event in several ways – about half of the conference participants are high school students. This is possible thanks to the Molecular Frontiers Foundation which offers a scholarship for students from all over the country to come. The Molecular Frontiers emphasize in particular the importance of being curious and asking good questions. Approximately 150 students from all over the country are given the opportunity to listen to and ask questions to world-leading researchers.<br /><br /><br />Among the speakers are noted:<br /><br /><strong>Steven Chu, Nobel Prize winner in Physics 1997 and Obama's Energy Ministers 2009-2013.</strong><br />Steven Chu was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1997 for his work on laser cooling of atoms. Since then, his research has increasingly been about solving the challenges of climate change and sustainable energy supply. In 2009, Barack Obama appointed him the United States Secretary of Energy, and became the first scientist in an American government. After his time as Energy Secretary, he returned to research but remains a prominent debater focusing on renewable energy and nuclear power. He emphasizes the importance of reducing fossil fuel use to address global warming and climate change. He has put forward a number of innovative and sometimes controversial proposals for action.<br /><br /><strong>Paul Alivisatos, University of California at Berkeley</strong><br />Paul Alivisatos is a pioneer in nanotechnology, focusing on inorganic nanocrystals. By controlling the size and surface of the nanocrystals, his research team can tailor their properties and produce materials for a variety of applications, including solar cells and materials to reduce carbon dioxide into hydrocarbons. He has developed quantum dots, small semiconductors that are isolated from the environment and are extremely effective in absorbing and transmitting light. These are already used in the most energy efficient and high quality television screens in market today.<br /><br /><strong>Daniel Nocera, Harvard University</strong><br />Two inventions of Daniel Nocera may be of great importance in the future. The artificial leaf, mentioned in Time magazine’s list of Inventions of the Year 2011, mimics the photosynthesis, and splits water into hydrogen and oxygen by using sunlight. A further development of the concept is the bionic leaf, which takes carbon dioxide from the air and combines it with hydrogen from the artificial leaf to produce biomass and liquid fuel. In this way, a cycle is achieved that is much more efficient than photosynthesis in nature, which can contribute to a green and cheap production of fuel and food.<br /><br /><br /><strong>Program</strong><br /><a href="/en/conference/sustainableenergy/Documents/Program_Sustainable_Energy.pdf" target="_blank">Here you will find the entire program for the conference &gt;</a><br /><br /><br />Plenary lectures 7-8 December:<br />• <strong>Steven Chu</strong> – <em>Climate Change and innovative paths to a sustainable future</em><br />Nobel laureate in Physics 1997, former United States Secretary of Energy. Stanford University, United States<br />• <strong>Dame Julia King</strong> – <em>Electric vehicles in a sustainable energy system</em><br />The Baroness Brown of Cambridge DBE <br />• <strong>Sir Richard Friend</strong> – <em>How can molecules function as semiconductors?</em><br />University of Cambridge, United Kingdom<br />• <strong>Daniel G. Nocera</strong> – <em>Fuels and Food from Sunlight, Air and Water</em><br />Harvard University, United States<br />• <strong>Paul Alivisatos</strong> – <em>Quantum Dot Light Emitters: from displays to enabling a new generation of energy conversion systems</em><br />University of California, Berkeley, United States<br />• <strong>Josef Michl</strong> – <em>Singlet Fission for Solar Cells</em><br />University of Colorado Boulder, United States and Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Czech Republic <br />• <strong>Katherine Richardson</strong> – <em>How do we transition an entire country’s energy system to renewables?</em><br />University of Copenhagen, Denmark<br />• <strong>Harry Atwater</strong> – <em>Fuelling Human Progress with Sunlight</em><br />California Institute of Technology, United States<br />• <strong>Susanne Siebentritt</strong> – <em>Thin film solar cells – achievements and challenges</em><br />University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg<br />•<strong> Jean-Marie Tarascon</strong> – <em>Materials science for electrochemical storage: Achievements and new directions</em><br />Collège de France, FranceMon, 04 Dec 2017 11:00:00 +0100https://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/energy/news/Pages/New-coordinator-for-Sustainable-Vehicle-Technologies.aspxhttps://www.chalmers.se/en/areas-of-advance/energy/news/Pages/New-coordinator-for-Sustainable-Vehicle-Technologies.aspxSelma Brynolf: Coordinator for Sustainable Vehicle Technologies<p><b>​She does research on tomorrow’s fuels and believes that we need to change our view on transportation. Selma Brynolf is coordinator for the profile Sustainable Vehicle Technologies within Chalmers Areas of Advance Transport and Energy.</b></p>​“It's an exciting assignment and I look forward to learning more about the research on transport and sustainable vehicles that is conducted at Chalmers and University of Gothenburg.”<br /><br />As post-doc at the department of Space, Earth and Environment at Chalmers, Selma Brynolf has evaluated the environmental impact of marine fuels from a lifecycle perspective and worked with modeling of energy systems. Since October 2017, she will also coordinate Sustainable Vehicle Technologies, a profile shared between the Areas of Advance Transport and Energy. She will work together with Anders Nordelöf, who continues his assignment as vice coordinator.<br /><br />“I currently work with two main questions”, says Selma Brynolf. “Evaluation of possible future fuels and propulsion technologies for shipping, as well as the role that fuels produced from carbon dioxide and water using electricity could have in the transport sector.<br /><br />Maria Grahn, previous coordinator of Sustainable Vehicle Technologies, is now director of Chalmers Energy Area of Advance.<br /><br />“I am pleased and proud to announce a new, strong leadership for Sustainable Vehicle Technologies. Handing over to Selma Brynolf and Anders Nordelöf feels very good, I am certain that the work will be continued in the best possible way.”<br /><br />Selma points out that an important and challenging part of her research is to find sustainable solutions for all modes of transport. She believes that electrification is a possibility for many parts of the transport sector, not just for cars, and that it is very exciting to follow the development.<br /><br />“But there are many more areas that need to be developed. I also believe that we need to think again and change our view of transport in general and the benefit they give us. I hope to contribute to a slightly more sustainable transport sector.”<br /><br />Text: Julia Jansson och Emilia Lundgren<br />Fri, 03 Nov 2017 10:05:00 +0100